Skip header and navigation

Refine By

23 records – page 1 of 3.

Adaptation and evaluation of the National Cancer Institute's Diet History Questionnaire and nutrient database for Canadian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165732
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jan;10(1):88-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Ilona Csizmadi
Lisa Kahle
Ruth Ullman
Ursula Dawe
Thea Palmer Zimmerman
Christine M Friedenreich
Heather Bryant
Amy F Subar
Author Affiliation
Division of Population Health and Information, Alberta Cancer Board, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N 4N2. ilona.csizmadi@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jan;10(1):88-96
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Databases, Factual
Female
Food - classification
Food analysis
Food Habits
Food Supply
Food, Fortified
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals - analysis
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires - standards
Sensitivity and specificity
United States
Vitamins - analysis
Abstract
Despite assumed similarities in Canadian and US dietary habits, some differences in food availability and nutrient fortification exist. Food-frequency questionnaires designed for the USA may therefore not provide the most accurate estimates of dietary intake in Canadian populations. Hence, we undertook to evaluate and modify the National Cancer Institute's Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) and nutrient database.
Of the foods queried on the DHQ, those most likely to differ in nutrient composition were identified. Where possible these foods were matched to comparable foods in the Canadian Nutrient File. Nutrient values were examined and modified to reflect the Canadian content of minerals (calcium, iron, zinc) and vitamins (A, C, D, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, B6, folate and B12). DHQs completed by 13 181 Alberta Cohort Study participants aged 35-69 years were analysed to estimate nutrient intakes using the original US and modified versions of the DHQ databases. Misclassification of intake for meeting the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) was determined following analysis with the US nutrient database.
Twenty-five per cent of 2411 foods deemed most likely to differ in nutrient profile were subsequently modified for folate, 11% for vitamin D, 10% for calcium and riboflavin, and between 7 and 10% for the remaining nutrients of interest. Misclassification with respect to meeting the DRI varied but was highest for folate (7%) and vitamin A (7%) among men, and for vitamin D (7%) among women over 50 years of age.
Errors in nutrient intake estimates owing to differences in food fortification between the USA and Canada can be reduced in Canadian populations by using nutrient databases that reflect Canadian fortification practices.
PubMed ID
17212847 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between sleeping habits and food consumption patterns among 10-11-year-old children in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149232
Source
Br J Nutr. 2009 Nov;102(10):1531-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Lisa Westerlund
Carola Ray
Eva Roos
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Research Center, Paasikivenkatu 4, 00250 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2009 Nov;102(10):1531-7
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Fatigue
Female
Finland
Food - classification
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Sleep - physiology
Abstract
The increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity among children is of special concern. Inverse associations between sleep length and overweight have been found in children. Short sleeping hours result in hormonal changes, which increase perceived hunger and appetite. This could affect food intake, and consequently lead to overweight. The aim is to find out whether there is an association between adequate sleep and food consumption among 10-11-year-old school children in Finland. One thousand two hundred and sixty-five children (response rate 79 %), aged 9-11, from thirty-one schools filled in a questionnaire about their health behaviour. Inadequate sleep was measured as short sleeping hours during school nights and weekend nights, difficulties in waking up in the morning and tiredness during the day. Food consumption patterns were measured by two consumption indices, energy-rich foods and nutrient-dense foods, based on a short FFQ (sixteen items). Inadequate sleep is associated with food consumption patterns. Boys with shorter sleep duration during school nights, and who were felt tired during the day, were more likely to consume energy-rich foods. Girls with shorter sleep duration during school nights consumed more likely energy-rich foods and less likely nutrient-dense foods. Adjusting for physical activity and screen time weakened the explored associations. The associations with energy-rich foods were stronger for boys than for girls. Sleeping habits are associated with food consumption patterns. Shorter sleep duration during school nights in school children is associated with higher consumption of energy-rich foods.
PubMed ID
19664303 View in PubMed
Less detail

Children's preference for large portions: prevalence, determinants, and consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162714
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Jul;107(7):1183-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Cynthia K Colapinto
Angela Fitzgerald
L Janette Taper
Paul J Veugelers
Author Affiliation
Health Promotion Division, Sudbury & District Health Unit, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Jul;107(7):1183-90
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Child
Child Nutrition Sciences - education
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Diet - standards
Eating - physiology - psychology
Energy intake
Feeding Behavior - physiology - psychology
Female
Food - classification
Food Preferences
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Mass Media
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Overweight
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Schools
Size Perception
Vegetables
Abstract
Proliferation of large portions of snack and fast foods parallels dramatic increases in childhood obesity. This study investigates the prevalence, determinants, and consequences of large portions in children's diets.
As part of the 2003 Children's Lifestyle and School-performance Study, we surveyed 4,966 children in Nova Scotia regarding their usual portion sizes of french fries, meats, vegetables, and potato chips using three-dimensional graduated food models. We measured heights and weights and assessed dietary intake with the Harvard Youth Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire. Diet quality was summarized using the Diet Quality Index International (DQI-I). Parents were surveyed on food habits and socioeconomic background.
We used multilevel regression methods to examine determinants of children's large portion size choice and to evaluate the effect of this selection on energy intake, diet quality, and overweight.
Children reported preference for portions of french fries, meats, and potato chips that are larger and vegetable portions that are smaller than what is recommended. Children from socioeconomically disadvantaged families or who frequently eat while watching television and in fast-food restaurants preferred larger portions of french fries and potato chips. Consequences of consuming large portions of these foods included poor diet quality and increased energy intake. Consuming large portions of vegetables was associated with lower energy intake and better diet quality.
Successful marketing of large portions of french fries and potato chips may be at the expense of diet quality and appropriate energy intake. Policy regulations and nutrition education emphasizing appropriate portion sizes provide opportunities to prevent overweight and improve future health.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Jul;107(7):1107-1017604739
PubMed ID
17604749 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of international food guide pictorial representations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61684
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2002 Apr;102(4):483-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002

The DAFNE databank as a simple tool for nutrition policy. DAta Food NEtworking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61693
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Oct;4(5B):1187-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
A. Trichopoulou
Author Affiliation
Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Medical School, University of Athens, Greece. antonia@nut.uoa.gr
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Oct;4(5B):1187-98
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Educational Status
Europe
Food - classification - statistics & numerical data
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Geography
Health Behavior
Humans
Nutrition Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Nutrition Surveys
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To identify, quantify and depict variation of food habits in Europe, using data from the DAFNE (DAta Food NEtworking) databank. SETTING: Household budget survey data of 12 European countries, namely Belgium, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain and the United Kingdom, around 1990. RESULTS: Data from the DAFNE databank are presented in simple pictorial presentations, which reveal considerable disparities in food habits. Furthermore, there appears to be nutritional variation within countries by socio-demographic groups, defined by their residence and educational level. The distribution patterns of food availability provide insights into the determinants of food preferences, as conditioned by current forces. CONCLUSION: The factors influencing consumer choice are many and varied. Thus, in order to promote healthy eating, it is essential to identify the food habits of the target population. In this context, information derived from household budget surveys, used in the development of the DAFNE databank, could be very important.
PubMed ID
11924946 View in PubMed
Less detail

Determinants of diet quality among Quebecers aged 55-74.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181432
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2004;8(2):83-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
B. Shatenstein
S. Nadon
G. Ferland
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche, Institut universitaire de geriatrie de Montreal, 4565 Queen Mary, Montreal, QC, Canada H3W 1W5. bryna.shatenstein@umontreal.ca
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2004;8(2):83-91
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Diet - standards
Diet Surveys
Eating
Female
Food - classification
Food Habits
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Nutritional Requirements
Quebec
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
Sociodemographic, lifestyle and dietary characteristics were studied to gain insights into determinants of total diet quality and diversity in a weighted sample of 460 participants aged 55-74 (53% female) from the 1990 Enqu te qu b coise sur la nutrition (EQN) dataset.
Dietary data consisted of an interviewer-administered 24-hour recall and food frequency questionnaire, and a self-administered questionnaire on dietary behaviours, attitudes and perceptions. 24-hour recall data were coded into food groups as described in Canada's Food Guide for Healthy Eating. Diet quality was scored using the categorical Dietary Diversity Score (DDS, range 0-4) and continuous Dietary Adequacy Score (DAS, range 0-18). A second nonconsecutive recall (10% of subjects) permitted correction of food group portions for intraindividual variability and subsequent calculation and validation of usual DDS and DAS. Relationships were examined between the scores and independent variables. Forward leastwise logistic regession (DDS) and stepwise multiple regression (DAS) analyses were conducted with independent variables showing significant bivariate relationships.
Among men, breakfast consumption and eating commercially-prepared meals were positively associated with usual DDS, but poor social support and supplement use negatively predicted this score. Eating fewer than 3 meals daily, smoking, and dietary supplement use were negative predictors of usual DAS (r2=0.155). Among women, eating commercial foods was a negative predictor of usual DDS, as was preferring overweight to depriving themselves of favourite foods. Reporting that health concerns influenced food choices and disagreeing with the statement that effort is needed to have a nice body were positive determinants of usual DAS in women. On the other hand, eating fewer than 3 meals daily negatively predicted this dietary index (r2 = 0.162).
Gender differences in predictors of diet quality suggest the need to target nutrition health promotion to the needs of older men and women to encourage optimal eating habits.
PubMed ID
14978603 View in PubMed
Less detail

Determinants of variation in food cost and availability in two socioeconomically contrasting neighbourhoods of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170215
Source
Health Place. 2007 Mar;13(1):273-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Jim Latham
Tina Moffat
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, McMaster University, CNH 524, Hamilton, Ont, Canada.
Source
Health Place. 2007 Mar;13(1):273-87
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Costs and Cost Analysis
Diet - classification - economics
Food - classification - economics
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status - physiology
Ontario
Poverty Areas
Residence Characteristics - classification
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
This study addresses links between economic and nutritional variation in an urban North American setting. We employed a mixed-methods approach including mapping, semi-structured interviews, and food outlet surveys to investigate the public health impact of variation in the cost and availability of food between two socioeconomically distinct neighbourhoods of the City of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Food cost in supermarkets was not found to be higher in the low-income neighbourhood, though it was much higher in the variety stores that predominate in the low-income neighbourhood. Moreover, there was a very low availability of produce in the variety stores. Reduced fresh produce availability and lower incomes have the potential to negatively influence public health in the less-affluent study area by increasing the difficulty of acquiring healthy foods.
PubMed ID
16542866 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary benzo(a)pyrene intake during pregnancy and birth weight: associations modified by vitamin C intakes in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107027
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:217-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Talita Duarte-Salles
Michelle A Mendez
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Margaretha Haugen
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: duartesallest@fellows.iarc.fr.
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:217-23
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ascorbic Acid - pharmacology
Benzo(a)pyrene - administration & dosage - analysis - toxicity
Birth Weight - drug effects
Child
Cohort Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fetal Development - drug effects
Food - classification
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Heredodegenerative Disorders, Nervous System - chemically induced
Humans
Infant
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Microphthalmos - chemically induced
Multivariate Analysis
Mutagenicity Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Parity
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Abstract
Maternal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) during pregnancy has been associated with reduced fetal growth. However, the role of diet, the main source of PAH exposure among non-smokers, remains uncertain.
To assess associations between maternal exposure to dietary intake of the genotoxic PAH benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] during pregnancy and birth weight, exploring potential effect modification by dietary intakes of vitamins C, E and A, hypothesized to influence PAH metabolism.
This study included 50,651 women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Dietary B(a)P and nutrient intakes were estimated based on total consumption obtained from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and estimated based on food composition data. Data on infant birth weight were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN). Multivariate regression was used to assess associations between dietary B(a)P and birth weight, evaluating potential interactions with candidate nutrients.
The multivariate-adjusted coefficient (95%CI) for birth weight associated with maternal energy-adjusted B(a)P intake was -20.5g (-31.1, -10.0) in women in the third compared with the first tertile of B(a)P intake. Results were similar after excluding smokers. Significant interactions were found between elevated intakes of vitamin C (>85mg/day) and dietary B(a)P during pregnancy for birth weight (P
PubMed ID
24071023 View in PubMed
Less detail

The dimensions of 'traditional food' in reflexive modernity: Norway as a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108393
Source
J Sci Food Agric. 2013 Nov;93(14):3455-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Virginie Amilien
Atle Wehn Hegnes
Author Affiliation
SIFO-The National Institute for Consumer Research, P.B. 4682 Nydalen, N-0405, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Sci Food Agric. 2013 Nov;93(14):3455-63
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Cooking
Culture
Data Collection - methods
Diet - trends
Food - classification
Food Industry - trends
Humans
Norway
Perception
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This article aims to better understand the definition(s) of 'traditional' food. The authors discuss and exemplify how this rhetorical concept is used in the specialist literature and in Norwegian public debate. The authors ultimately propose a set of central dimensions of traditional food and their relevance across various discourses.
After examining the use of the concept 'tradition' in scientific publications, the authors note that it is based on two main axes: time and know-how. These are interwoven in a 'meaning' dimension in the connection between time and culture, but also in a 'place' dimension that is systematically materialised in food. In order to better describe and understand the dynamic that emerges from the interplay of innovation and tradition, the article goes through the broadest use of 'traditional food' in public discourses, in national and regional newspapers, and in consumers' attitudes. There, the concept of 'traditional food' is used for both preserving historic values and renewing sense of identity.
The article can be regarded as an empirical example which elaborates the understanding of tradition in reflexive modernity. It concludes that the concept of traditional food is neither fixed nor finite but is a fluid and energetic concept which, based on the tensions between four central axes, can adapt to the discourses of preservation, moderation and innovation.
PubMed ID
23893890 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food advertising during children's television in Canada and the UK.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150707
Source
Arch Dis Child. 2009 Sep;94(9):658-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
J. Adams
K. Hennessy-Priest
S. Ingimarsdóttir
J. Sheeshka
T. Ostbye
M. White
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health and Society, William Leech Building, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK. j.m.adams@ncl.ac.uk
Source
Arch Dis Child. 2009 Sep;94(9):658-62
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Child
Diet
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Food - classification
Great Britain
Humans
Legislation, Food
Nutritive Value
Suggestion
Television
Abstract
Television advertisements for less healthy foods are thought to contribute to overweight and obesity in children. In the UK, new regulations on television food advertising to children came into effect in April 2007. These prohibit advertisements for "less healthy" foods during or around programmes "of particular appeal to" (OPAT) children. In Canada, self-regulated codes of practice on television food advertising to children were recently strengthened.
To document the nutritional content of food advertised and number of advertisements OPAT children broadcast in the UK and central Canada before the introduction of the new UK regulations.
All food advertisements broadcast on four popular channels in Canada and the three terrestrial commercial channels in the UK during 1 week in 2006 were identified and linked to relevant nutritional data. Food advertisements OPAT children and for "less healthy" products were identified using the criteria in the UK regulations.
2315 food related advertisements broadcast in Canada and 1365 broadcast in the UK were included. 52-61% were for "less healthy" products; 5-11% were OPAT children. Around 5% of food advertisements would have been prohibited under the new UK regulations. There were few differences in the nutritional content of food described in advertisements that were and were not OPAT children.
There was little evidence that food described in advertisements OPAT children were any less healthy than those that were not. Few food advertisements are likely to be prohibited by the new UK regulations.
PubMed ID
19477912 View in PubMed
Less detail

23 records – page 1 of 3.