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[8 out of 10 midwives informed about folic acid. Most of them considered their knowledge about folic acid not sufficient]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30331
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Apr 7;101(15-16):1380-2, 1385-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-7-2004
Author
Anette Lundqvist
Anna Lena Wennberg
Gunvor Lövgren
Herbert Sandström
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för omvårdnad, Umeå universitet. anette.lundqvist@nurs.umu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Apr 7;101(15-16):1380-2, 1385-6
Date
Apr-7-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Nursing, Continuing
English Abstract
Female
Folic Acid Deficiency - complications - prevention & control
Guidelines
Health education
Humans
Maternal health services
Maternal Welfare
Neural Tube Defects - etiology - prevention & control
Nurse Midwives - education
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Deficiency of folic acid increases the risk for neural tube defects among newborn children and megaloblastic anaemia in the mother. The aim of this study was to make a survey of how midwives working in maternity health care, family planning guidance, and specialist prenatal care in a Swedish county inform women of childbearing age about folic acid. The questionnaire study showed that 79% of the midwives informed the women about folic acid. Usually, the women received information first when they asked for it and midwifes were less prone to inform young women about folic acid. 87% of the midwives felt that they did not know enough about folic acid. CONCLUSIONS: Midwives play an important role in information about the need of folic acid intake for women in childbearing age. Changes in local routines, guidelines and further education of midwifes would subsequently provide information about the importance of folic acid to women in childbearing age.
PubMed ID
15146665 View in PubMed
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Abstention from filtered coffee reduces the concentrations of plasma homocysteine and serum cholesterol--a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53873
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2001 Sep;74(3):302-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
B. Christensen
A. Mosdol
L. Retterstol
S. Landaas
D S Thelle
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. christensen@ioks.uio.no
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2001 Sep;74(3):302-7
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cholesterol - blood
Coffee - adverse effects - metabolism
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Filtration
Folic Acid - blood - metabolism
Homocysteine - blood - drug effects - metabolism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - etiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Elevated concentrations of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) and serum total cholesterol are risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD). Previous studies showed that the consumption of very high doses of unfiltered coffee increases tHcy and total cholesterol. OBJECTIVE: A prospective intervention study was performed to assess the effects of coffee consumption on the concentrations of tHcy and total cholesterol by using doses and brewing methods common in southeastern Norway. DESIGN: The study was an unblinded, controlled trial with 191 healthy, nonsmoking, coffee-drinking volunteers aged 24-69 y randomly assigned to 3 groups who were asked to consume for 6 consecutive weeks no coffee, 1-3 cups (approximately 175-525 mL)/d, or > or =4 cups (approximately 700 mL)/d prepared in the manner to which they were accustomed. Blood samples were drawn when the subjects were randomly assigned and at 3 and 6 wk of the trial. Dietary data were collected by questionnaire. RESULTS: Ninety-seven percent of the participants reported being regular consumers of caffeinated filtered coffee. Abstention from coffee for 6 wk was associated with a decrease in the tHcy concentration of 1.08 micromol/L and a decrease in the total cholesterol concentration of 0.28 mmol/L in participants who had been drinking on average 4 cups of filtered coffee daily for the past year. Adjustments for several possible confounders did not alter the results. CONCLUSION: Abstention from filtered coffee in doses that are commonly consumed was associated with lower concentrations of tHcy and total cholesterol.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 May;75(5):948-9; author reply 949-5011976172
PubMed ID
11522552 View in PubMed
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Achieving a public health recommendation for preventing neural tube defects with folic acid.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200166
Source
Am J Public Health. 1999 Nov;89(11):1637-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
M M Werler
C. Louik
A A Mitchell
Author Affiliation
Slone Epidemiology Unit, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Mass., USA. mwerler@slone.bu.edu
Source
Am J Public Health. 1999 Nov;89(11):1637-40
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Boston - epidemiology
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Food, Fortified
Guidelines as Topic
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hematinics - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Neural Tube Defects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Ontario - epidemiology
Philadelphia - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Preconception Care - methods
Public Health
United States
Abstract
This study examined 3 approaches to achieving the public health recommendation that all women of child-bearing age ingest 0.40 mg of folic acid per day to reduce the occurrence of neural tube defects (NTDs).
A total of 1136 mothers of infants with major malformations from the Boston and Philadelphia areas, whose pregnancies began from 1993 to 1995, were interviewed within 6 months of delivery about vitamin supplementation, dietary intakes, and other factors.
Seventy-one percent of the 1136 women in the study did not take folic acid--containing supplements daily before conception, but the proportion decreased over the years of the study. Women not taking supplements consumed an average of 0.25 mg of naturally occurring folates daily. On the basis of dietary intakes reported by women not taking folic acid supplements, a simulation of cereal grain fortification with folic acid at the level required by the US Food and Drug Administration showed that an average of only 0.13 mg of folic acid would be ingested daily.
With consumption of folic acid only through dietary intake, sizeable portions of the childbearing population would receive less than the level of folic acid recommended for preventing NTDs. Even with food fortification, women of childbearing age should be advised to take folic acid--containing supplements on a daily basis.
Notes
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PubMed ID
10553381 View in PubMed
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Adequacy of niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 intakes from foods among Newfoundland and Labrador adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113239
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):63-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jennifer Colbourne
Natasha Baker
Peter Wang
Lin Liu
Christina Tucker
Barbara Roebothan
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):63-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cereals
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Food, Fortified
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Niacin - administration & dosage - blood
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Recommended dietary allowances
Risk factors
Vitamin B 12 - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Adequacy of intake for niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 from food was estimated in an adult population in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). Also considered was whether study findings support current Canadian food fortification policies.
Four hundred randomly selected adult NL residents were surveyed by telephone. Secondary analysis was performed on two 24-hour food recalls for each participant. Mean daily intakes of niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 were estimated from foods only and compared by sex/age subgroup. Adequacy of intakes was estimated. Contributions of folate by ready-to-eat cereal and bread products were also estimated.
Intakes of all three nutrients were higher in men. In comparison with recommendations, daily niacin intakes were as follows: excessive for 21.9% of all participants (and for 56.8% of men aged 28 to 54), within the recommended range for 73.6%, and less than adequate for 4.5%. In comparison with recommendations, daily folate intakes were as follows: within the recommended range for 18.1% of participants and less than adequate for 81.9%. In comparison with recommendations, daily vitamin B12 intakes were less than adequate for 36.3% of participants.
More than 20% of those surveyed were consuming, from food alone, niacin at levels above the maximum recommended. Food fortification policies pertaining to niacin should be revisited. In addition, despite fortification, NL adults may be consuming inadequate amounts of folate from foods.
PubMed ID
23750977 View in PubMed
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Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes among Adolescents in Northwest Russia: A Population Registry-Based Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296661
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 02 03; 15(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
02-03-2018
Author
Anna A Usynina
Vitaly Postoev
Jon Øyvind Odland
Andrej M Grjibovski
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø 9037, Norway. perinat@mail.ru.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 02 03; 15(2):
Date
02-03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Apgar score
Body Weight
Delivery, Obstetric
Dietary Supplements
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - statistics & numerical data
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Registries
Reproductive Tract Infections - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to assess whether adolescents have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) compared to adult women. We used data on 43,327 births from the population-based Arkhangelsk County Birth Registry, Northwest Russia, for 2012-2014. The perinatal outcomes included stillbirth, preterm birth (
PubMed ID
29401677 View in PubMed
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Annual trends in use of periconceptional folic acid and birth prevalence of major congenital malformations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108772
Source
Curr Drug Saf. 2013 Jul;8(3):153-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Audrey-Ann Richard-Tremblay
Odile Sheehy
Anick Bérard
Author Affiliation
University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Curr Drug Saf. 2013 Jul;8(3):153-61
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology - physiopathology
Databases, Factual
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Abnormalities - epidemiology
Nervous System Malformations - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Registries
Treatment Outcome
Vitamin B Complex - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent evidence suggests that periconceptional folic acid use could not only prevent neural tube defects but also other malformations. The objectives of this study were to assess trends in dispensed high dose periconceptional folic acid (5 mg) and birth prevalence of major congenital malformations.
The Quebec Pregnancy Registry, an administrative database with information on periconceptional prescribed medication and diagnostic codes was used to conduct this study. All pregnant women insured by the Quebec public drug plan between January 1(st) 1998 and December 31(st) 2008 were included. The exposure was defined as the use of high dose periconceptional folic acid 30 days before, and during the first 70 days of pregnancy. The outcome measured was the birth prevalence of major congenital malformations among live births.
We identified 152,392 pregnancies and babies. The annual prevalence of high dose periconceptional folic acid use increased from 0.17% to 0.80% (p
PubMed ID
23845112 View in PubMed
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An Ontario-wide study of vitamin B12, serum folate, and red cell folate levels in relation to plasma homocysteine: is a preventable public health issue on the rise?.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197028
Source
Clin Biochem. 2000 Jul;33(5):337-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
J G Ray
D E Cole
S C Boss
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Clin Biochem. 2000 Jul;33(5):337-43
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Biological Markers
Creatinine - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements - statistics & numerical data
Erythrocyte Indices
Erythrocytes - chemistry
Female
Folic Acid Deficiency - blood - metabolism
Hemoglobins
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Vitamin B 12 - blood
Vitamin B 12 Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
Plasma homocysteine has been reported to be useful in the evaluation of patients with suspected vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. In November 1998, Canada began its mandatory fortification of all flour, and some corn and rice products, with folic acid. We evaluated the status of folate and vitamin B12 in Ontario since this fortification program began, and also studied the role of plasma homocysteine in the assessment of vitamin B12 deficiency since that time.
A retrospective cross-sectional study design was performed using a community database of all Ontario samples analyzed by MDS Laboratories, a major provider of diagnostic laboratory services in Canada. All consecutive single-patient fasting samples for plasma homocysteine collected between January 1 and September 30, 1999 were included, as well as corresponding red cell folate and serum B12 concentrations. Data for serum folate were included when available. Descriptive statistics included the arithmetic and geometric means for each measure, as well as the lower and upper centile values. After excluding cases with a concomitant serum creatinine > 120 micromol/L or red cell folate 15 micromol/L did not discriminate between cobalamin concentrations below versus above 120 pmol/L (positive and negative predictive values 7.4% and 97.2%, respectively), nor did it discriminate "indeterminate" B12 levels between 120 and 150 pmol/L (positive and negative predictive values 6.3% and 94.0%, respectively).
In a large select group of Ontarians, serum and red cell folate concentrations appear to be higher than expected, possibly due to a recent national folate fortification programme; cobalamin levels are no higher than expected. Given our inability to detect mild B12 deficiency using such indicators as plasma homocysteine, and considering the substantial growth in the elderly segment of the Canadian population, occult cobalamin deficiency could become a common disorder. Accordingly, we recommend either consideration of the addition of vitamin B12 to the current folate fortification programme, and/or the development of better methods for the detection of cobalamin deficiency.
PubMed ID
11018684 View in PubMed
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Are dietary vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids and folate associated with treatment results in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis? Data from a Swedish population-based prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290863
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 06 10; 7(6):e016154
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
06-10-2017
Author
Cecilia Lourdudoss
Alicja Wolk
Lena Nise
Lars Alfredsson
Ronald van Vollenhoven
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 06 10; 7(6):e016154
Date
06-10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Dietary Supplements
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Abstract
Dietary intake of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids (FA) may be associated with superior response to antirheumatic treatments. In addition, dietary folate intake may be associated with worse response to methotrexate (MTX). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dietary vitamin D, omega-3 FA, folate and treatment results of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
This prospective study was based on data from the Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA) study, and included 727 patients with early RA from 10 hospitals in Sweden. Data on dietary vitamin D, omega-3 FA and folate intake based on food frequency questionnaires were linked with data on European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response after 3?months of DMARD treatment. Associations between vitamin D, omega-3 FA, folate and EULAR response were analysed with logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders.
The majority of patients (89.9%) were initially treated with MTX monotherapy and more than half (56.9%) with glucocorticoids. Vitamin D and omega-3 FA were associated with good EULAR response (OR 1.80 (95% CI 1.14 to 2.83) and OR 1.60 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.53), respectively). Folate was not significantly associated with EULAR response (OR 1.20 (95% CI 0.75 to 1.91)). Similar results were seen in a subgroup of patients who were initially treated with MTX monotherapy at baseline.
Higher intake of dietary vitamin D and omega-3 FA during the year preceding DMARD initiation may be associated with better treatment results in patients with early RA. Dietary folate intake was not associated with worse or better response to treatment, especially to MTX. Our results suggest that some nutrients may be associated with enhanced treatment results of DMARDs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28601838 View in PubMed
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The association between atopy and factors influencing folate metabolism: is low folate status causally related to the development of atopy?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81891
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;35(4):954-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Husemoen Lise Lotte N
Toft Ulla
Fenger Mogens
Jørgensen Torben
Johansen Niels
Linneberg Allan
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen County Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup, Denmark. lloh@glostruphosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;35(4):954-61
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - metabolism
Genotype
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - etiology - metabolism
Male
Methionine - administration & dosage
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2) - genetics
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Polymorphism, Genetic
Questionnaires
Riboflavin - administration & dosage
Risk Assessment - methods
Vitamin B 12 - administration & dosage
Vitamin B 6 - administration & dosage
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Deficiency of folate has been associated with several disorders characterized by enhanced activation of the cellular immune system (non-allergic th1 type immune response). Whether folate status is also associated with atopic disease (allergic th2 type immune response) is unknown. We aimed at examining the association between atopy and markers of impaired folate metabolism, i.e. MTHFR(C677T) genotype, plasma total homocysteine, and dietary intakes of methionine, folates, and vitamins B12, B6, and B2. METHODS: Cross-sectional population-based study of 1,671 male and female residents of Copenhagen County, Denmark, aged 30-60 years participating in a health examination during 1999-2001. Atopy was defined as positive levels of specific IgE against a panel of inhalant allergens. MTHFR(C677T) genotype was determined by PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses. Total homocysteine was measured by fluorescent polarization immunoassay. Dietary vitamin intakes were estimated from a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: The prevalence of atopy was associated with MTHFR(C677T) genotype. TT individuals had a significantly higher risk of atopy compared with CC/CT individuals [odds ratio 1.76, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.19-2.60]. Additionally, gene-diet interaction effects were identified. Dietary markers were negatively associated with risk of atopy in persons with the TT genotype. Total homocysteine was not related to atopy (odds ratio per 5 mumol/l = 1.12, 95% CI 0.98-1.29). CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that an impaired folate metabolism may be causally related to the development of atopy.
PubMed ID
16766537 View in PubMed
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392 records – page 1 of 40.