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Association between inhibited binding of folic acid to folate receptor alpha in maternal serum and folate-related birth defects in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134465
Source
Hum Reprod. 2011 Aug;26(8):2232-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
A L Boyles
J L Ballard
E B Gorman
D R McConnaughey
R M Cabrera
A J Wilcox
R T Lie
R H Finnell
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Branch, NIEHS/NIH, Durham, NC 27709, USA. boylesa@niehs.nih.gov
Source
Hum Reprod. 2011 Aug;26(8):2232-8
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Autoantibodies - analysis
Case-Control Studies
Cleft Lip - etiology
Cleft Palate - etiology
Female
Folate Receptor 1 - blood - immunology
Folic Acid - metabolism
Folic Acid Deficiency - complications
Humans
Neural Tube Defects - etiology
Norway
Pregnancy
Abstract
Folic acid intake during pregnancy can reduce the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) and perhaps also oral facial clefts. Maternal autoantibodies to folate receptors can impair folic acid binding. We explored the relationship of these birth defects to inhibition of folic acid binding to folate receptor a (FRa), as well as possible effects of parental demographics or prenatal exposures.
We conducted a nested case-control study within the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. The study included mothers of children with an NTD (n = 11), cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P, n= 72), or cleft palate only (CPO, n= 27), and randomly selected mothers of controls (n = 221). The inhibition of folic acid binding to FRa was measured in maternal plasma collected around 17 weeks of gestation. On the basis of prior literature, the maternal age, gravidity, education, smoking, periconception folic acid supplement use and milk consumption were considered as potential confounding factors.
There was an increased risk of NTDs with increased binding inhibition [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-1.8]. There was no increased risk of oral facial clefts from inhibited folic acid binding to FRa (CL/P aOR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.6-1.0; CPO aOR = 1.1, 95% CI 0.8-1.4). No association was seen between smoking, folate supplementation or other cofactors and inhibition of folic acid binding to FRa.
Inhibition of folic acid binding to FRa in maternal plasma collected during pregnancy was associated with increased risk of NTDs but not oral facial clefts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21576080 View in PubMed
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Commentaries -- Nutrition and metabolism

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94108
Source
Pages 154-164 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Canmentaries 155 normal. Iron deficiency was common. Eskimos showed almost universally low serlilil folate values, and Indians somewhat less freque ntly. Intak es of vitamin D and calcium were low in most diets , but serum calcium levels were normal and rickets was not observe d. Dietary deficits of
  1 document  
Source
Pages 154-164 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Aleuts
Diabetes mellitus
Direct photon absorptiometry
Disadaptive changes
Eskimos
Folate
Glucose tolerance
Indians
Iodine deficiency
Iron deficiency
Lactic Acid
Metabolic disease
Nganasans
Novosibirsk
Obesity
Phospholipids
Pribilof Islands
Pyruvic Acid
Rickets
Serum protein
Tlingits
Vitamin A
Notes
"Nutritional status of Indians and Eskimos as revealed by Nutrition Canada" (A.L. Forbes)
"Metabolic disease in arctic populations" (Edward M. Scott)
"Glucose tolerance among Aleuts on the Pribilof Islands" (S.E. Dippe, P.H. Bennett, D.W. Dippe, T. Humphry, J. Burks, and M. Miller)
"Biochemical mechanisms of human adaptation to the extreme factors of the north" (L. Panin)
"Bone mineral content of north Alaskan Eskimos" (Richard B. Mazess and Warren Mather)
"Bone mineral content in Canadian Eskimos" (Richard B. Mazess and Warren E. Mather)
Documents
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Congenital heart defects in Canadian Inuit: Is more folic acid making a difference?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84158
Source
Pages 163-166 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49(2 Suppl):163-166
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
of septal heart defects in the Eastern Arctic. Methods: Inuit mothers of children from communities on Baffin Island with and without heart defects were invited to participate in a case control study evaluating nutrient intake, pregnancy exposures, RBC folate, serum cobalamin, homocysteine, and
  1 document  
Author
Arbour, L.
Rupps, R.
MacDonald, S.
Forth, M.
Yang, J.
Nowdluk, M.
Osborne, G.
Author Affiliation
Dept of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia.
Source
Pages 163-166 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49(2 Suppl):163-166
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Folate
Inuit
Septal heart defects
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Grain fortification of flour with folic acid has successfully reduced neural tube defects (NTDs) by approximately one half of the pre-fortification rate. The knowledge that the use of multivitamins with folic acid has also been shown to reduce some birth defects has prompted interest in determining whether folic acid may also play a role in the prevention of non-neural tube defects. Although NTDs are not more frequent in the Inuit of the Eastern Arctic, septal heart defects, were documented pre-fortification (1989-1994) to be increased 4 fold. OBJECTIVES: To determine if current efforts of fortification are sufficient and to explore other genetic/ environmental determinants of the increased rate of septal heart defects in the Eastern Arctic. METHODS: Inuit mothers of children from communities on Baffin Island with and without heart defects were invited to participate in a case control study evaluating nutrient intake, pregnancy exposures, RBC folate, serum cobalamin, homocysteine, and functional polymorphisms for genes important in folate metabolism and uptake. RESULTS: 41 children with isolated heart defects and their mothers with 36 community matched Inuit controls have entered the study to date. RESULTS: There were no differences in RBC folate (953 Vs 922 nmol/L p = .49), serum cobalamin, and homocysteine, between mothers of cases and controls. The combined average RBC folate for the women ages 18-45 was 947 +/- 32 nmol/L. There was no difference between any documented alcohol (H"30%) and cigarette (H"82%) use in pregnancy. No Inuit women were taking vitamins at conception or at the time of this study. The results of the genetic studies will be reported elsewhere. CONCLUSIONS: RBC folate (post-fortification) in our sample of women of childbearing years is reassuring. However, it is possible that pre-fortification levels combined with genetic predisposition may have previously influenced the high rate of heart defects. Follow-up study is underway to determine if rates of heart defects have decreased since fortification was commenced. Since folate alone may not be sufficient to reduce non-neural tube defects, culturally appropriate public health efforts need to be initiated to encourage multivitamin use periconceptionally.
PubMed ID
17929627 View in PubMed
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Heme carrier protein 1 (HCP1) genetic variants in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study participants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152913
Source
Blood Cells Mol Dis. 2009 Mar-Apr;42(2):150-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
XinJing Wang
Catherine Leiendecker-Foster
Ronald T Acton
James C Barton
Christine E McLaren
Gordon D McLaren
Victor R Gordeuk
John H Eckfeldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. wangx6@mail.nih.gov
Source
Blood Cells Mol Dis. 2009 Mar-Apr;42(2):150-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Cohort Studies
Continental Population Groups - genetics
DNA Mutational Analysis
Ethnic Groups - genetics
Exons - genetics
Hemochromatosis - blood - ethnology - genetics
Heterozygote
Histocompatibility Antigens Class I - genetics
Humans
Introns - genetics
Iron - blood
Iron Overload - blood - ethnology - genetics
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics - physiology
Mutation, Missense
Nucleic Acid Denaturation
Point Mutation
Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter
Sampling Studies
Transferrin - analysis
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Heme carrier protein 1 (HCP1) has been identified as a possible heme carrier by in vitro analysis. To determine the association of mutations within the HCP1 gene with iron phenotypes, we examined the entire coding region of the HCP1 gene in 788 US and Canadian participants selected from the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. We sequenced the exon and flanking intronic regions if variants were detected. We tested 298 non-C282Y homozygotes from four racial/ethnic backgrounds (White, Black, Asian, and Hispanic) selected because they had high serum ferritin (SF) and transferrin saturations (TS). As controls, we chose 300 other random participants of the same racial/ethnic backgrounds from the same geographic locations. From the 333 HEIRS Study C282Y homozygotes, we selected 75 based on high SF and TS, 75 based on low SF and TS; and 75 were selected randomly as controls. Thirty-five of the randomly selected C282Y homozygotes were also included in the high and the low SF and TS groups due to numerical limitations. We identified eight different HCP1 genetic variants; each occurred in a heterozygous state. Except one, each was found in a single HEIRS Study participant. Thus, HCP1 variants are infrequent in the populations that we tested. Five HEIRS Study participants had non-synonymous, coding region HCP1 variants. Each of these five had TS above the 84th gender- and ethnic/racial group-specific percentile (TS percentiles: 84.7, 91.3, 97.9, 99.5, and 99.9).
Notes
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PubMed ID
19176287 View in PubMed
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Source
Nunavut. Department of Health and Social Services. Nutrition Fact Sheet Series.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2005, revised 2013
encouraged, as long as the source is acknowledged. Animal and Plant Fact Sheets Beluga Narwhal Seal Walrus Caribou Muskox Polar Bear Rabbit (Arctic Hare) Ducks and Geese Ptarmigan Clams, Mussels and Shrimp Fish Berries Plant Greens Seaweed Nutrient Fact Sheets Fat Protein Calcium Folate Iron Potassium
  1 document  
Source
Nunavut. Department of Health and Social Services. Nutrition Fact Sheet Series.
Date
2005, revised 2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3398603
Keywords
Inuit
Traditional diet
Traditional knowledge
Vitamin D
Vitamin C
Vitamin A
Iron
Folate
Calcium
Potassium
Protein
Fat
Documents

NutritionFactsheetsEnglish11-13-13-low-res_0.pdf

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The role of folate receptor alpha in cancer development, progression and treatment: cause, consequence or innocent bystander?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170913
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Jul 15;119(2):243-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2006
Author
Linda E Kelemen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. L.Kelemen@post.harvard.edu
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Jul 15;119(2):243-50
Date
Jul-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Carrier Proteins - metabolism
Cytosol - metabolism
DNA, Neoplasm - metabolism
Dietary Supplements
Disease Progression
Folate Receptor 1
Folate Receptors, GPI-Anchored
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood - metabolism
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Homocysteine - metabolism
Humans
Mutation
Neoplasms - drug therapy - genetics - metabolism - pathology
Prognosis
Receptors, Cell Surface - metabolism
Transcription Factors - metabolism
Tumor Cells, Cultured
United States
Abstract
Folate receptor alpha (FRalpha) is a membrane-bound protein with high affinity for binding and transporting physiologic levels of folate into cells. Folate is a basic component of cell metabolism and DNA synthesis and repair, and rapidly dividing cancer cells have an increased requirement for folate to maintain DNA synthesis, an observation supported by the widespread use of antifolates in cancer chemotherapy. FRalpha levels are high in specific malignant tumors of epithelial origin compared to normal cells, and are positively associated with tumor stage and grade, raising questions of its role in tumor etiology and progression. It has been suggested that FRalpha might confer a growth advantage to the tumor by modulating folate uptake from serum or by generating regulatory signals. Indeed, cell culture studies show that expression of the FRalpha gene, FOLR1, is regulated by extracellular folate depletion, increased homocysteine accumulation, steroid hormone concentrations, interaction with specific transcription factors and cytosolic proteins, and possibly genetic mutations. Whether FRalpha in tumors decreases in vivo among individuals who are folate sufficient, or whether the tumor's machinery sustains FRalpha levels to meet the increased folate demands of the tumor, has not been studied. Consequently, the significance of carrying a FRalpha-positive tumor in the era of folic acid fortification and widespread vitamin supplement use in countries such as Canada and the United States is unknown. Epidemiologic and clinical studies using human tumor specimens are lacking and increasingly needed to understand the role of environmental and genetic influences on FOLR1 expression in tumor etiology and progression. This review summarizes the literature on the complex nature of FOLR1 gene regulation and expression, and suggests future research directions.
PubMed ID
16453285 View in PubMed
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A study of the nutritional status of an Inuit population in the Canadian High Arctic. Part 1. Biochemical evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2575
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 78:229-235.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
Verdier, P.C.
Eaton, R.D.
Cooper, B.
Author Affiliation
Health and Welfare Canada
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 78:229-235.
Date
1987
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Arctic Bay
Diet, general
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
Hemoglobin
Cholesterol
Iron
Folate
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1230.
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7 records – page 1 of 1.