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1992 records – page 1 of 200.

The 'ability' paradigm in vocational rehabilitation: challenges in an Ontario injured worker retraining program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131610
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2012 Mar;22(1):105-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
E. MacEachen
A. Kosny
S. Ferrier
K. Lippel
C. Neilson
R L Franche
D. Pugliese
Author Affiliation
Institute for Work & Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. emaceachen@iwh.on.ca
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2012 Mar;22(1):105-17
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Employment
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Ontario
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Rehabilitation, Vocational - economics - methods
Workers' Compensation - organization & administration
Abstract
In recent years, a focus on workers' ability, rather than impairment, has guided disability management services. However, a challenge with the notion of 'ability' is identification of the border between ability and inability. This article considers this gray zone of disability management in the case of a workers' compensation vocational retraining program for injured workers in Ontario.
In-depth interviews and focus groups were conducted with a purposive sample of 71 participants who were directly involved with the vocational retraining process. Workers in the program had on average incurred injury 3 years earlier. Procedural and legal documents were also analyzed. Principles of grounded theory and discourse analysis guided the data gathering and analysis.
A program focus on worker abilities did not allow for consideration of unresolved medical problems. Concepts such as maximum medical rehabilitation distracted attention from workers' ongoing chronic and unstable health situations, and incentive levers to employers directed some of the least capable workers into the program. As well, communication pathways for discussing health problems were limited by rules and provider reluctance to reveal problems. Therefore, workers completing the program were deemed 'employable', while ongoing and problematic health conditions preventing employment remained relatively uncharted and invisible.
This study reinforces how the shift in disability management paradigm to a focus on ability and return to work requires consideration of environmental conditions, including policies and programs and implementation. A focus on the environment in which worker ability can be enacted might be as important as a focus on improving individual worker characteristics.
PubMed ID
21894535 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal community-centered injury surveillance: a community-based participatory process evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129138
Source
Prev Sci. 2012 Apr;13(2):107-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Mariana Brussoni
Lise L Olsen
Pamela Joshi
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, BC Injury Research & Prevention Unit, L408 - 4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC V6H 3V4, Canada. mbrussoni@cw.bc.ca
Source
Prev Sci. 2012 Apr;13(2):107-17
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Ethnic Groups
Focus Groups
Humans
Leadership
Population Surveillance
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
While injuries are a leading health concern for Aboriginal populations, injury rates and types vary substantially across bands. The uniqueness of Aboriginal communities highlights the importance of collecting community-level injury surveillance data to assist with identifying local injury patterns, setting priorities for action and evaluating programs. Secwepemc First Nations communities in British Columbia, Canada, implemented the Injury Surveillance Project using the Aboriginal Community-Centered Injury Surveillance System. This paper presents findings from a community-based participatory process evaluation of the Injury Surveillance Project. Qualitative data collection methods were informed by OCAP (Ownership, Control, Access, and Possession) principles and included focus groups, interviews and document review. Results focused on lessons learned through the planning, implementation and management of the Injury Surveillance Project identifying lessons related to: project leadership and staff, training, project funding, initial project outcomes, and community readiness. Key findings included the central importance of a community-based and paced approach guided by OCAP principles, the key role of leadership and project champions, and the strongly collaborative relationships between the project communities. Findings may assist with successful implementation of community-based health surveillance in other settings and with other health issues and illustrate another path to self-determination for Aboriginal communities. The evaluation methods represent an example of a collaborative community-driven approach guided by OCAP principles necessary for work with Aboriginal communities.
Notes
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Cites: J Agric Saf Health. 2009 Jan;15(1):19-3519266882
PubMed ID
22138890 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal health workers experience multilevel barriers to quitting smoking: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124122
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anna P Dawson
Margaret Cargo
Harold Stewart
Alwin Chong
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
University of South Australia, Sansom Institute for Health Research, Social Epidemiology and Evaluation Research Group, GPO Box 2471, IPC: CEA-01, Adelaide, South Australia, 5001, Australia.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:27
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Competency
Delivery of Health Care - ethnology - methods
Female
Focus Groups
Health Manpower - statistics & numerical data
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Smoking Cessation - ethnology - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Long-term measures to reduce tobacco consumption in Australia have had differential effects in the population. The prevalence of smoking in Aboriginal peoples is currently more than double that of the non-Aboriginal population. Aboriginal Health Workers are responsible for providing primary health care to Aboriginal clients including smoking cessation programs. However, Aboriginal Health Workers are frequently smokers themselves, and their smoking undermines the smoking cessation services they deliver to Aboriginal clients. An understanding of the barriers to quitting smoking experienced by Aboriginal Health Workers is needed to design culturally relevant smoking cessation programs. Once smoking is reduced in Aboriginal Health Workers, they may then be able to support Aboriginal clients to quit smoking.
We undertook a fundamental qualitative description study underpinned by social ecological theory. The research was participatory, and academic researchers worked in partnership with personnel from the local Aboriginal health council. The barriers Aboriginal Health Workers experience in relation to quitting smoking were explored in 34 semi-structured interviews (with 23 Aboriginal Health Workers and 11 other health staff) and 3 focus groups (n = 17 participants) with key informants. Content analysis was performed on transcribed text and interview notes.
Aboriginal Health Workers spoke of burdensome stress and grief which made them unable to prioritise quitting smoking. They lacked knowledge about quitting and access to culturally relevant quitting resources. Interpersonal obstacles included a social pressure to smoke, social exclusion when quitting, and few role models. In many workplaces, smoking was part of organisational culture and there were challenges to implementation of Smokefree policy. Respondents identified inadequate funding of tobacco programs and a lack of Smokefree public spaces as policy level barriers. The normalisation of smoking in Aboriginal society was an overarching challenge to quitting.
Aboriginal Health Workers experience multilevel barriers to quitting smoking that include personal, social, cultural and environmental factors. Multidimensional smoking cessation programs are needed that reduce the stress and burden for Aboriginal Health Workers; provide access to culturally relevant quitting resources; and address the prevailing normalisation of smoking in the family, workplace and community.
Notes
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Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2008;29:325-5018173388
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Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Dec;67(11):1708-1618938006
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Apr;38(2):470-719047078
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 2010 Feb;33(1):77-8420014004
Cites: J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2010;6:2620831827
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2011 Feb;35(1):47-5321299700
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:10222533609
PubMed ID
22621767 View in PubMed
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"A call for a clear assignment" - A focus group study of the ambulance service in Sweden, as experienced by present and former employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292617
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2018 01; 36:1-6
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2018
Author
Helena Rosén
Johan Persson
Andreas Rantala
Lina Behm
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, SE 221 00 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: helena.rosen@med.lu.se.
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2018 01; 36:1-6
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances - manpower
Attitude of Health Personnel
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Emergency Medical Technicians - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Workplace - psychology - standards
Abstract
The aim was to explore the ambulance service as experienced by present and former employees.
Over the last decade, the number of ambulance assignments has increased annually by about 10%, and as many as 50% of all ambulance assignments are considered non-urgent. This raises questions about which assignments the Ambulance Service (AS) is supposed to deal with.
Data were collected from three focus group interviews with a total of 18 present and former employees of the Swedish AS. An inductive qualitative analysis method developed by Krueger was chosen.
Five themes emerged in the analysis: "Poor guidance for practice", "An unclear assignment", "Being a gate keeper", "From saving lives to self-care" and "Working in no man's land", which together constitute the AS.
Present and former employees of the AS in Sweden describe their mission as unclear and recognize the lack of consensus and a clearly developed mission statement. Furthermore, expectations and training mainly focus on emergency response, which is contrary to the reality of the ambulance clinicians' everyday work.
PubMed ID
28712766 View in PubMed
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[Accelerated versus conventional hospital stay in total hip and knee arthroplasty II: organizational and clinical differences].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168857
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 29;168(22):2144-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-29-2006
Author
Henrik Husted
Hans Christian Hansen
Gitte Holm
Charlotte Bach-Dal
Kirsten Rud
Kristoffer Lande Andersen
Henrik Kehlet
Author Affiliation
H:S Hvidovre Hospital, Ortopaedkirurgisk Afdeling, Hvidovre. henrikhusted@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 29;168(22):2144-8
Date
May-29-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - nursing - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - nursing - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Early Ambulation - statistics & numerical data
Focus Groups
Hospital Departments - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Length of Stay
Orthopedics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns
Registries
Abstract
The goal of this study was to evaluate hospital stays for patients operated on with primary total hip- and knee-arthroplasty (THA and TKA) in order to identify important logistical and clinical areas for the duration of the hospital stay.
According to the National Register on Patients, the three departments with the shortest and the three departments with the longest postoperative hospital stay at the end of 2003 were chosen for evaluation. This took place from late 2004 to mid 2005, and all written material and 25 journals from each department were evaluated, and interviews with the heads of the departments as well as the staff were conducted. The logistical set-up and the clinical treatment/pathway were examined in an attempt to identify logistical and clinical factors acting as improvements or barriers for quick rehabilitation and subsequent discharge.
Departments with short hospital stay were characterised by both logistical (homogenous entities, regular staff, high continuity, using more time on and up-to-date information including expectations of a short stay, functional discharge criteria) and clinical features (multi-modal pain treatment, early mobilization and discharge when criteria were met) facilitating quick rehabilitation and discharge.
Implementation of logistical and clinical features, as shown in this study in all departments, are expected to increase rehabilitation and reduce the length of hospital stay.
PubMed ID
16768951 View in PubMed
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The acceptability and feasibility of an intercultural birth center in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114720
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13:94
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Kathryn Tucker
Hector Ochoa
Rosario Garcia
Kirsty Sievwright
Amy Chambliss
Margaret C Baker
Author Affiliation
Department of International Health, NHS, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057, USA.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13:94
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Birthing Centers - utilization
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Home Childbirth
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Mexico
Midwifery - education - standards
Patient Preference - ethnology
Pregnancy
Abstract
An intercultural birthing house was established in the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico, as an intervention to reduce maternal mortality among indigenous women. This birth center, known locally as the Casa Materna, is a place where women can come to give birth with their traditional birth attendant. However, three months after opening, no woman had used the birthing house.
This study reports on the knowledge, attitudes and practices related to childbirth and use of the Casa Materna from the perspective of the health workers, traditional birth attendants and the program's target population. Structured interviews, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with participants from each of these groups. Data was searched for emerging themes and coded.
Findings show that the potential success of this program is jeopardized by lack of transport and a strong cultural preference for home births. The paper highlights the importance of community participation in planning and implementing such an intervention and of establishing trust and mutual respect among key actors. Recommendations are provided for moving forward the maternal health agenda of indigenous women in Chiapas.
Notes
Cites: J Sex Res. 2002 Feb;39(1):58-6212476258
Cites: Midwifery. 2004 Sep;20(3):217-2515337277
Cites: Salud Publica Mex. 2004 Sep-Oct;46(5):388-9815521523
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2005 Aug;61(4):785-9515950091
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 3;367(9525):1859-6916753489
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Sep 30;368(9542):1189-20017011946
Cites: J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2007;3:3117803820
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Mar;66(5):1057-6918187246
Cites: Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2008 Aug;24(2):75-8419062598
Cites: Midwifery. 2009 Aug;25(4):411-2118053623
Cites: Health Policy Plan. 2011 Nov;26(6):496-50721278371
PubMed ID
23587122 View in PubMed
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The acceptability of a depression screening tool in an urban, Aboriginal community-controlled health service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162060
Source
Aust N Z J Public Health. 2007 Jun;31(3):259-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Danielle M Esler
Fay Johnston
David Thomas
Author Affiliation
Danila Dilba Health Service, Northern Territory General Practice Education and Flinders University, South Australia. danielleelser@hotmail.com
Source
Aust N Z J Public Health. 2007 Jun;31(3):259-63
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services
Depression - diagnosis
Focus Groups
Humans
Oceanic ancestry group - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Urban Population
Abstract
To assess the acceptability and face validity of a psychological assessment instrument, the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9), as a depression screening tool for use with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.
Four focus groups were held in an urban, Aboriginal community-controlled health service. Participants' attitudes to screening for depression and the specific components of PHQ-9 were explored.
Process-oriented and PHQ-9-specific themes were raised. They included the role of family in the screening process, the need for a trusting relationship between the tool administrator and patient, the risk of confounding by social disadvantage or physical co-morbidities, the absence of a question assessing the presence of anger as a symptom of depression, and the importance of culturally appropriate language within the tool.
Modification of the screening process and wording of the PHQ-9 in response to these concerns should render it acceptable for use with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients in this setting.
These results may apply to the use of other psychological screening tools in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. This is particularly relevant given the policy emphasis on screening in Indigenous health.
PubMed ID
17679245 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of a wearable hand hygiene device with monitoring capabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155144
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2008 Nov;70(3):216-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
V M Boscart
K S McGilton
A. Levchenko
G. Hufton
P. Holliday
G R Fernie
Author Affiliation
Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. boscart.veronique@torontorehab.on.ca
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2008 Nov;70(3):216-22
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Electronics
Female
Focus Groups
Gels - administration & dosage
Hand Disinfection
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Infection Control - instrumentation - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Reminder Systems - instrumentation
Abstract
Transmisssion of infection within healthcare institutions is a significant threat to patients and staff. One of the most effective means of prevention is good hand hygiene. A research team at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Ontario, Canada, developed a wearable hand disinfection system with monitoring capabilities to enhance hand wash frequency. We present the findingsof the first phase of a larger study addressing the hypothesis that an electronic hand hygiene system with monitoring and reminding propertieswill increase hand hygiene compliance. This first phase focused on the acceptability and usability of the wearable electronic hand wash device ina clinical environment. The feedback from healthcare staff to the first prototype has provided evidence for the research team to continue with the development of this technology.
Notes
Erratum In: J Hosp Infect. 2009 Apr;71(4):389
PubMed ID
18799234 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of extrusion cooked cereal/legume weaning food supplements to Ghanaian mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195584
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2001 Jan;52(1):83-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
Y. Mensa-Wilmot
R D Phillips
S. Sefa-Dedeh
Author Affiliation
Center for Food Safety and Quality Enhancement-Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, Agricultural Experiment Station, Griffin, GA 30223-1797, USA.
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2001 Jan;52(1):83-90
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cereals
Chi-Square Distribution
Consumer Satisfaction
Dietary Supplements
Fabaceae
Female
Focus Groups
Food Handling
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Mothers
Plants, Medicinal
Software
Weaning
Abstract
Six cereal/legume mixtures were developed with the aid of computer-assisted optimization software from cereal and legume staples indigenous to the West African sub-region. The mixtures had 45-50% maize, 35-40% decorticated cowpeas and either blanched peanuts or decorticated soybeans as a source of lipid and complementary amino acids. Three processing schemes involving roasting, amylase digestion and extrusion cooking were employed. The proportion of ingredients in each cereal/legume blend was based on meeting the nutrient requirement of the 0.5-0.9-year-old infant and cost considerations. Nutrient composition of the blends (proximate, amino acid, mineral and vitamin composition) indicated that these formulations were adequate nutritionally as weaning supplements (Mensa-Wilmot et al, 2000a,2000b). These formulations were evaluated by mothers of weanling children based on their preferences with respect to color, flavor, texture and willingness to purchase the product assessed. A total of 133 one-on-one interviews and 23 group discussions were conducted (involving 6-12 respondents) with selected Ghanaian women. The mothers found the convenience of a weaning food made from local staples that could be processed on village/market scale very attractive.
PubMed ID
11225182 View in PubMed
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Accessing health services while living with HIV: intersections of stigma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147943
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2009 Sep;41(3):168-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Judy Mill
Nancy Edwards
Randy Jackson
Wendy Austin
Lynne MacLean
Frances Reintjes
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2009 Sep;41(3):168-85
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Focus Groups
HIV Infections - psychology - therapy
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Stereotyping
Abstract
AIDS stigma has serious consequences. This study explored those practices within health-care organizations that persons with HIV perceive as stigmatizing. It used an exploratory, descriptive design using a participatory action research approach. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with 16 Aboriginal and 17 non-Aboriginal persons living with HIV as well as with 27 health-care providers. The AIDS stigma perceived by many participants often intersected with other forms of stigma, related to behaviour, culture, gender, sexual orientation, or social class. In addition, policies at the organizational level contributed to AIDS stigma and at times intersected with stigma at the individual level. Participants' experiences of stigma and discrimination were shaped by the organizational policies (universal precautions, models of care) and design (physical layout) under which care was provided. Several paradoxes associated with secrecy, health-care settings, and the layering of stigma emerged in the reported experiences.
PubMed ID
19831060 View in PubMed
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1992 records – page 1 of 200.