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Near misses: paradoxical realities in everyday clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153317
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2008 Dec;14(6):486-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Lianne Jeffs
Dyanne D Affonso
Kathleen Macmillan
Author Affiliation
Keenan Research Centre of, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. jeffsl@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2008 Dec;14(6):486-94
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Focus Groups
Humans
Medical Errors
Ontario
Abstract
This qualitative study was conducted to define and describe what constitutes and contributes to near miss occurrences in the health-care system and what is needed to ensure safer processes of care. Nine health-care organizations (13 sites total) including six academic health sciences centres (acute care, mental health and geriatric) and three community hospitals participated in this study. The final sample consisted of 37 focus groups (86 in the nursing staff only; 62 in the pharmacy staff only; and 99 in the mixed nursing and pharmacy focus groups respectively) and 120 interviews involving 144 health-care consumers. Data were collected using focus groups (health-care professionals) and key informant interviews (health-care consumers). A multi-level content analyses schema (transcription, coding, categorizing, internal consistency, thematic analysis and community validation) was used. Six themes emerged from the multi-level content analyses that combined focus group (health-care professionals) and key informant interview (health-care consumers) data. These themes are discussed under the three original research questions with supporting data derived from codes and categories. Study findings implicate changes for the health-care landscape relative to system, health policy, professional development and quality improvement.
PubMed ID
19126078 View in PubMed
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An adolescent focus group project on sexually transmitted disease, HIV/AIDS, and unplanned pregnancy

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102684
Source
Pages 101-102 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
AN ADOLESCENT FOCUS GROUP PROJECT ON SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE, HIV/AIDS, AND UNPLANNED PREGNANCY J. Leston Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium Background: The disparity in sexually transmitted disease (STD) rates between Alaska Native and non-Native populations, particularly among
  1 document  
Author
Leston, J
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium
Source
Pages 101-102 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
adolescents
AIDS
Focus Groups
HIV
Pregnancy
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 2. Infectious Diseases and Sexual Health.
Documents
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Interviewing the moderator: an ancillary method to focus groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180412
Source
Qual Health Res. 2004 May;14(5):714-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Janine Morgall Traulsen
Anna Birna Almarsdóttir
Ingunn Björnsdóttir
Author Affiliation
Danish University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2004 May;14(5):714-25
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Focus Groups
Group Processes
Humans
Iceland
Research Design
Abstract
There has been an upsurge of academic interest in using focus groups (FGs) as a main or stand-alone qualitative method. In this article, the authors introduce a recently developed ancillary method to FGs called interviewing the moderator. The method is employed immediately after an FG and consists of a one-on-one interview with the FG moderator by another member of the research team. The authors argue, with reference to a specific study, that interviewing the moderator adds a new and valuable dimension to group interviews used in research. They describe how this method came about and provide a concrete example of its use in a recently completed research project. They discuss several advantages of the interview, among them that it provides information about group interaction and participant behavior, and furnishes additional data on what is discussed when the tape recorder is turned off.
PubMed ID
15107173 View in PubMed
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The meaning of autonomy in nursing practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150209
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2010 Aug;19(15-16):2226-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Randi Skår
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Studies, Sogn and Fjordane University College, Norway and Department of Education, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. randi.skar@hisf.no
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2010 Aug;19(15-16):2226-34
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Norway
Nursing
Professional Autonomy
Abstract
To illuminate the meaning of nurses' experiences of autonomy in work situations.
Professional autonomy means having the authority to make decisions and the freedom to act in accordance with one's professional knowledge base. An understanding of autonomy is needed to clarify and develop the nursing profession in rapidly changing health care environments and internationally there is a concern about how the core elements of nursing are taken care of when focusing on expansion and extension of specialist nursing roles.
Qualitative study.
This paper reports part of a project aimed at exploring the education and work qualifications required by the nursing profession. Eleven Norwegian nurses, each with 2-3 years of work experience since graduation, participated in both in-depth interviews and focus group interviews in 2006. A qualitative hermeneutic approach, inspired by Gadamer's philosophy, guided the research process and the analysis and interpretation of the transcribed interview-texts.
The nurses' descriptions of their experiences of autonomy in work situations emerged as four themes: 'to have a holistic view', 'to know the patient', 'to know that you know' and 'to dare'. To be knowledgeable and confident was found to be the coherent meaning of autonomy in nursing practice.
Authority of total patient care, the power to make decisions in a relationship with the patient and next of kin and the freedom to make clinical judgements, choices and actions seem to be connected to the meaning of autonomy in nursing practice.
To gain autonomous practice, nurses must be competent and have the courage to take charge in situations where they are responsible. This study shows the challenges in handling this autonomous practice.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Nurs. 2010 Sep;19(17-18):2662-320941847
PubMed ID
19538554 View in PubMed
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The good, bad, and ugly of online recruitment of parents for health-related focus groups: lessons learned.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106154
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2013;15(11):e250
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Susan Quach
Jennifer A Pereira
Margaret L Russell
Anne E Wormsbecker
Hilary Ramsay
Lois Crowe
Sherman D Quan
Jeff Kwong
Author Affiliation
Public Health Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2013;15(11):e250
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Focus Groups
Humans
Internet
Ontario
Parents
Patient Selection
Questionnaires
Abstract
We describe our experiences with identifying and recruiting Ontario parents through the Internet, primarily, as well as other modes, for participation in focus groups about adding the influenza vaccine to school-based immunization programs.
Our objectives were to assess participation rates with and without incentives and software restrictions. We also plan to examine study response patterns of unique and multiple submissions and assess efficiency of each online advertising mode.
We used social media, deal forum websites, online classified ads, conventional mass media, and email lists to invite parents of school-aged children from Ontario, Canada to complete an online questionnaire to determine eligibility for focus groups. We compared responses and paradata when an incentive was provided and there were no software restrictions to the questionnaire (Period 1) to a period when only a single submission per Internet protocol (IP) address (ie, software restrictions invoked) was permitted and no incentive was provided (Period 2). We also compared the median time to complete a questionnaire, response patterns, and percentage of missing data between questionnaires classified as multiple submissions from the same Internet protocol (IP) address or email versus unique submissions. Efficiency was calculated as the total number of hours study personnel devoted to an advertising mode divided by the resultant number of unique eligible completed questionnaires .
Of 1346 submitted questionnaires, 223 (16.6%) were incomplete and 34 (2.52%) did not meet the initial eligibility criteria. Of the remaining 1089 questionnaires, 246 (22.6%) were not from Ontario based on IP address and postal code, and 469 (43.1%) were submitted from the same IP address or email address (multiple submissions). In Period 2 vs Period 1, a larger proportion of questionnaires were submitted from Ontario (92.8%, 141/152 vs 75.1%, 702/937, P
Notes
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2012;14(1):e2822360969
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2013;15(2):e3123403043
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2008;10(5):e5019073542
Cites: Annu Rev Psychol. 2004;55:803-3214744235
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2004 Sep 29;6(3):e3415471760
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2010 Jul;12(7):768-7520530194
Cites: Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2006 Spring;36(3):295-30916362240
Cites: AIDS Behav. 2008 Nov;12(6):964-7318240015
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2002 Nov;63(6):755-6112529076
Cites: Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2009 Jan;15(1):96-10419209984
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2005;7(1):e615829478
PubMed ID
24231040 View in PubMed
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The dialectic tension between 'being' and 'not being' a good nurse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165919
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2006 Nov;13(6):622-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Lisbeth Fagerström
Author Affiliation
Swedish Polytechnic, Seriegatan 2, 65 320 Vasa, Finland. lisbeth.fagerstrom@syh.fi
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2006 Nov;13(6):622-32
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Empathy
Ethical Analysis
Ethics, Nursing
Finland
Focus Groups
Humans
Workload
Abstract
The aim of this hermeneutic study was to gain a broader understanding of nurses' workload and what characterizes a nurse's experience in terms of the various levels of intensity of nursing care. Twenty-nine nurses participated in seven focus groups. The interpretation process took place in six different phases and the three laws of dialectics were used as interpretation rules. An optimal nursing care intensity level can be understood as a situation characterized by the balance between the intensity of care needed by patients and the external and internal factors of the current nursing care situation. The nurses' work situation can be understood as a dialectic struggle between 'being' and 'not being' a good nurse; this can be said to be the underlying root metaphor. Nursing care can be understood as consisting of 'complex and meaningful caring situations'. Dialectics can be used as a fruitful method of revealing the complexity of clinical reality.
PubMed ID
17193803 View in PubMed
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Determinants of tobacco-related health literacy: A qualitative study with early adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283994
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2016 Oct;62:71-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Heidi Parisod
Anna Axelin
Jouni Smed
Sanna Salanterä
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2016 Oct;62:71-80
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Finland
Focus Groups
Health Literacy
Humans
Male
Abstract
Today's adolescents are used to a constant information flow, but many face difficulties in processing health-related information due to low health literacy. There is still need for deeper understanding on the determinants of health literacy in relation to adolescents to guide the development of health literacy instruments and interventions.
The purpose of this study was to explore, from the perspective of early adolescents, the determinants of health literacy in the context of tobacco-related health communication.
A qualitative descriptive study.
Two schools located in the south of Finland. One school represented a typical Finnish public school with students following general curriculum and the other represented a Finnish public school with students with special educational needs.
Purposively selected sample of 10-13-year-old early adolescents (n=39) from the two schools to obtain a varied group of early adolescents representing different kinds of literacy levels.
We conducted 10 focus groups with early adolescents and analyzed the data using the theoretical thematic analysis method. We used a combination of the determinants presented in three adolescent-specific health literacy models as the theoretical framework of deductive analysis. The remaining data extracts were coded inductively. We sorted the codes under sub-themes that represented different determinants of health literacy. These were further divided between three themes: "personal", "external", and "mediating" determinants. Finally, we named the themes with an expression that embodied the early adolescents' views and experiences.
Early adolescents' descriptions revealed that the list of determinants presented in the three adolescent-specific health literacy models is not comprehensive enough. Early adolescents brought up how their motives, self-efficacy, and role expectations determine their health literacy in addition to the other personal determinants presented in the previous models. Their descriptions also suggest that external determinants include interpersonal relations with authorities, idols and random people, and the socio-cultural atmosphere as new factors. New mediating determinants that have a separate influence on health literacy were recognized based on early adolescents' descriptions as well.
Our findings give a new, adolescent-oriented insight on the determinants of adolescents' health literacy. Based on the findings, there are additional personal, external, and mediating determinants that are not included in the current adolescent-specific health literacy models. These newly found determinants require attention and further exploration. The acquired knowledge can be used for strengthening existing adolescent-specific health literacy models, and as a basis of health literacy instrument and intervention development.
PubMed ID
27459318 View in PubMed
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"Let's get real" myth & meaning in nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191866
Source
Can J Nurs Leadersh. 2001 Nov-Dec;14(4):5-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Ferguson-Paré
G J Mitchell
Author Affiliation
University Health Network, Toronto, ON. mary.ferguson-pare@uhn.on.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Leadersh. 2001 Nov-Dec;14(4):5-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Focus Groups
Humans
Leadership
Mythology
Nursing Process
Nursing Theory
PubMed ID
11803944 View in PubMed
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Focus on occupational therapists' paradigms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190026
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1999;13(3):165-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
A. Björklund
Author Affiliation
University College of Health Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden. Anita.Bjorklund@hhj.hj.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1999;13(3):165-70
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Focus Groups
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Occupational Therapy - manpower
Sweden
Abstract
The primary aim of this study was to identify and characterize the perceptions of seven experienced occupational therapists' about their profession, in particular with respect to a 'world view' and a 'field of action view'. The secondary aim was to determine whether there were similarities among the respondents' personal paradigms that could constitute a potential, local ideology for the group. The study has an explorative design based on Törnebohm's theory of paradigms. Qualitative data were collected on three occasions during the autumn of 1996, using audio- and video-taped, thematic discussions, involving focus groups. The data were analysed qualitatively within the two paradigm components, 'world view' and 'field of action view'. The results show several unifying factors, and dissimilarities were limited to specifications within these unifying factors, with respect to the respondents' notions. The unifying factors could be described as a potential, local ideology for the group.
PubMed ID
12033121 View in PubMed
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Support and intervention groups for adolescents with cancer in two Ontario communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167845
Source
Cancer. 2006 Oct 1;107(7 Suppl):1680-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2006
Author
Maru Barrera
Sheila Damore-Petingola
Carly Fleming
Judy Mayer
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. maru.barrera@sickkids.ca
Source
Cancer. 2006 Oct 1;107(7 Suppl):1680-5
Date
Oct-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Focus Groups
Humans
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Ontario
Social Support
Abstract
Adolescents who are treated for cancer must learn to negotiate challenging developmental tasks in the context of their treatment and adverse effects. Adverse affects of disease and treatment may prevent some of these adolescents from achieving full psychosocial development. Two programs developed independently to address the psychosocial and unique contextual needs of adolescents and young adults from different geographic regions in Ontario, Central urban and Northeastern rural, are described. The program in the urban area consists of eight 2-h sessions that combined structured creative activities and informal discussions of issues generated by adolescents; it includes a pre- post- intervention evaluation with standardized questionnaires. The Northeastern rural program consists of a monthly support open group that encourages sharing personal experiences and an annual expressive art retreat; both components include informal evaluation. Formal evaluation of these programs is in progress. Informal feedback from participants and parents suggest positive effects. These distinct and unique programs continue to evolve, as they address the unique psychosocial needs of adolescents and young adults in urban and rural areas.
PubMed ID
16921483 View in PubMed
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1963 records – page 1 of 197.