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Low intake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Sweden: results based on market basket data and a barbecue study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265211
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2014 Dec;74:107-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Lilianne Abramsson-Zetterberg
Per Ola Darnerud
Sören Wretling
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2014 Dec;74:107-11
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benz(a)Anthracenes - administration & dosage - analysis
Benzo(a)pyrene - administration & dosage - analysis
Chrysenes - administration & dosage - analysis
Cooking
Dairy Products - analysis
Eating
Fluorenes - administration & dosage - analysis
Food analysis
Humans
Meat - analysis
Meat Products - analysis
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - administration & dosage - analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a market basket study made at the National Food Agency in Sweden, in which the most common consumed foodstuffs are sampled, the content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) and PAH4 (B(a)P, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, and benz(a)anthracene) were analysed. To this data, results on B(a)P and PAH4 levels originating from a home-barbecue-study on sausages and loin of pork were added. The calculated total mean intake of B(a)P and PAH4 was 50?ng/person and day 276?ng/person and day, respectively. Sugar and sweets, cereal products, meat, and dairy products contributed most to the total intake. In case of PAH concentrations below LOD, 0.03??g/kg, ? LOD was used in the intake calculations. The highest mean level of B(a)P and PAH4 were found in the barbecued products, but since the estimated consumption in Sweden is low, the contribution to the total food intake is almost negligible, about 2%. The calculated B(a)P levels in food has decreased during the last 10 years and indicates a low cancer risk for the Swedish population.
PubMed ID
25261863 View in PubMed
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