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Assessment of Nutritional Adequacy of Packaged Gluten-free Food Products.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271315
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2014 Dec;75(4):186-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Tasha Kulai
Mohsin Rashid
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2014 Dec;75(4):186-90
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - adverse effects - analysis - economics
British Columbia
Costs and Cost Analysis
Diet, Gluten-Free - adverse effects - economics
Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects - economics
Edible Grain - adverse effects - chemistry - economics
Fast Foods - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Flour - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Food Labeling
Frozen Foods - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Humans
Meat Products - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
Nutritive Value
Serving Size
Abstract
There is concern about the nutritional quality of processed gluten-free (GF) products. The aim was to investigate the nutrient composition and cost of processed GF products compared with similar regular products.
Product size, price, caloric value, and macro- and micronutrient composition were compared between foods labeled "Gluten-free" and comparable regular products in 5 grocery stores in 3 Canadian cities. Data were calculated per 100 g of product.
A total of 131 products were studied (71 GF, 60 regular). Overall, calories were comparable between GF and regular foods. However, fat content of GF breads was higher (mean 7.7 vs. 3.6 g, P = 0.003), whereas protein was lower (mean 5.0 vs. 8.0 g, P = 0.001). Mean carbohydrate content of GF pasta was higher (78 vs. 74 g, P = 0.001), whereas protein (7.5 vs. 13.3 g, P
PubMed ID
26067071 View in PubMed
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Gluten contamination of naturally gluten-free flours and starches used by Canadians with celiac disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256559
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2013;30(12):2017-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Terence B Koerner
Chantal Cleroux
Christine Poirier
Isabelle Cantin
Sébastien La Vieille
Stephen Hayward
Sheila Dubois
Author Affiliation
a Bureau of Chemical Safety, Food Directorate, Health Canada , Ottawa , ON , Canada.
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2013;30(12):2017-21
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Celiac Disease - diet therapy
Cereals - adverse effects - chemistry - economics
Diet Surveys
Diet, Gluten-Free - adverse effects
Dietary Fiber - analysis
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Fagopyrum - adverse effects - chemistry - economics
Flour - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Food Contamination
Food Handling
Food Labeling
Glutens - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Internet
Nuts - adverse effects - chemistry - economics
Panicum - adverse effects - chemistry - economics
Seeds - adverse effects - chemistry
Soy Foods - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Starch - adverse effects - chemistry - economics
Abstract
A large national investigation into the extent of gluten cross-contamination of naturally gluten-free ingredients (flours and starches) sold in Canada was performed. Samples (n = 640) were purchased from eight Canadian cities and via the internet during the period 2010-2012 and analysed for gluten contamination. The results showed that 61 of the 640 (9.5%) samples were contaminated above the Codex-recommended maximum level for gluten-free products (20 mg kg?¹) with a range of 5-7995 mg kg?¹. For the ingredients that were labelled gluten-free the contamination range (5-141 mg kg?¹) and number of samples were lower (3 of 268). This picture was consistent over time, with approximately the same percentage of samples above 20 mg kg?¹ in both the initial set and the subsequent lot. Looking at the total mean (composite) contamination for specific ingredients the largest and most consistent contaminations come from higher fibre ingredients such as soy (902 mg kg?¹), millet (272 mg kg?¹) and buckwheat (153 mg kg?¹). Of the naturally gluten-free flours and starches tested that do not contain a gluten-free label, the higher fibre ingredients would constitute the greatest probability of being contaminated with gluten above 20 mg kg?¹.
PubMed ID
24124879 View in PubMed
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