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59 records – page 1 of 6.

Accounting for the contribution of vitamin B to Canada's WWII effort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138851
Source
J Hist Sociol. 2010;23(4):517-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Robyn Braun
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta.
Source
J Hist Sociol. 2010;23(4):517-41
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - economics - history
Canada - ethnology
Flour - economics - history
Food, Fortified - economics - history
Government Programs - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 20th Century
Humans
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Public Health - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Vitamin B Complex - history
Vitamin B Deficiency - ethnology - history
World War II
Abstract
Canada began to fortify its flour and bread with vitamin B when it entered the Second World War. The decision was informed by the biology of vitamin B and therefore I suggest that the complexity of this political maneuver can best be understood by considering the specificity of the biochemistry of vitamin B. In this paper I will show that the specific biology of vitamin B allowed the Canadian government the possibility of a healthier population under wartime conditions but also allowed the government a variety of means by which to develop and organize food processing practices to this end.
PubMed ID
21132948 View in PubMed
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Acrylamide-asparagine relationship in baked/toasted wheat and rye breads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156290
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Kit Granby
Nikoline Juul Nielsen
Rikke V Hedegaard
Tue Christensen
Mette Kann
Leif H Skibsted
Author Affiliation
Technical University of Denmark, National food Institute, Søborg, DK-2860, Denmark. kgr@food.dtu.dk
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - analysis
Asparagine - analysis
Bread - analysis
Carcinogens - analysis
Cooking - methods
Denmark
Diet
Flour
Food Technology - methods
Hot Temperature
Humans
Maillard Reaction
Risk Assessment - methods
Secale cereale
Triticum
Abstract
Acrylamide in baked and toasted wheat and rye bread was studied in relation to levels of asparagine in flour, dough, bread and toasts. Asparagine was consumed during bread preparation resulting in reduced acrylamide content in the products. In wheat bread, 12% of the asparagine initially present in the flour (0.14 g kg(-1)) remained after yeast fermentation and baking; for rye bread, 82% of asparagine remained after sourdough fermentation and baking. Asparagine present in untoasted wheat bread had totally reacted after hard toasting. Toasted wheat and rye bread slices contained 11-161 and 27-205 microg kg(-1) acrylamide, respectively, compared to untoasted wheat and rye bread with
PubMed ID
18608496 View in PubMed
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Alkylresorcinols in Latvian and Finnish breads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122442
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2013 Feb;64(1):117-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Laila Meija
Adile Samaletdin
Anja Koskela
Aivars Lejnieks
Vilnis Lietuvietis
Herman Adlercreutz
Author Affiliation
Riga Stradins University, Riga, Latvia. laila@meija.lv
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2013 Feb;64(1):117-21
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - analysis
Diet
Dietary Fiber - analysis
Finland
Flour - analysis
Humans
Latvia
Plant Extracts - chemistry
Resorcinols - analysis
Secale cereale - chemistry
Seeds - chemistry
Triticum - chemistry
Abstract
The alkylresorcinol (AR) content and relative homologue composition were determined in 9 Latvian and 11 Finnish soft breads. ARs were extracted with hot 1-propanol and quantified, using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The total AR content (µg/g dry matter) varied from 560 to 840 in rye breads, from 500 to 700 in Finnish mixed rye and wheat flour breads, from 200 to 300 in Latvian mixed rye and wheat flour breads and from 25 to 30 in white wheat breads. Rye and white wheat breads in the two countries varied only slightly in AR content, but there were wide variations in AR content in mixed flour breads. The AR contents in soft breads could be indicators of bran or fibre content, but not of whole-grain flour content.
PubMed ID
22816971 View in PubMed
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[Ambient air pollution with flour dust at the sites of baking and macaroni enterprises].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136821
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Sep-Oct;(5):22-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
L A Tepikina
A A Safiulin
Z V Shipulina
L T Volokhova
A B Kariakina
L S L'vova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Sep-Oct;(5):22-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dust - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Flour
Food Industry
Humans
Incidence
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Ambient air pollution with flour dust (FD) and microorganisms, including microscopic fungi, was studied; the single concentrations of FD under emission plumes were 0.12-0.17 mg/m3; the total content of mould, field, and storage fungi was 700 +/- 30, 671 +/- 19, and 29 +/- 3, respectively. The maximum allowable concentrations for FD were ascertained; the equal ones were the maximum single concentration of 1.0; the daily average concentration was 0.4 mg/m3; hazard class IV; the limiting hazard index was their resorptive activity.
PubMed ID
21341487 View in PubMed
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Annual variation of deoxynivalenol in Danish wheat flour 1998-2003 and estimated daily intake by the Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78422
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2007 Mar;24(3):315-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Rasmussen Peter Have
Petersen Annette
Ghorbani Faranak
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research - Food Chemistry, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, Søborg 2860, Denmark. phr@dfvf.dk
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2007 Mar;24(3):315-25
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid - methods
Denmark
Flour - analysis
Food Analysis - methods
Food contamination - analysis
Food Habits
Humans
Mass Spectrometry - methods
Rain
Seasons
Temperature
Trichothecenes - administration & dosage - analysis
Triticum - chemistry
Abstract
The occurrence of deoxynivalenol (DON) in Danish wheat flour was studied during the period 1998-2003 by either capillary gas chromatography with electron capture detection and liquid chromatography coupled to an ion trap mass spectrophotometer. A total of 151 samples were collected from mills and the retail market in Denmark. Contamination levels varied considerably from year-to-year with the highest concentrations occurring in samples from the 2002 harvest with mean and median concentrations of 255 and 300 microg kg(-1), respectively. Compared to other harvest years, 2002 had the highest amount of precipitation around flowering time, i.e. from the end of June to the beginning of July covering weeks 25-27. The lowest average levels were found in samples from the 2001 harvest, where weeks 25-27 were dry compared with other harvest years. The highest value (705 microg kg(-1)) was obtained in a flour sample from the 2002 harvest, but none of the tested samples exceeded the maximum limit of 750 microg kg(-1), which has been recently introduced by the European Commission for DON in flour used as raw materials in food products. Calculation of chronic or usual intake by a deterministic approach showed that intake did not exceed the TDI of 1 microg kg(-1) bw day(-1) either for the whole population or for children. A probabilistic approach also showed that intake in general was below the TDI, but intake for children in the 99% percentile amounted to more than 75% of the TDI. The highest intake is calculated to be 2.5 microg kg(-1) bw day(-1).
PubMed ID
17364935 View in PubMed
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Assessment of Nutritional Adequacy of Packaged Gluten-free Food Products.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271315
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2014 Dec;75(4):186-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Tasha Kulai
Mohsin Rashid
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2014 Dec;75(4):186-90
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - adverse effects - analysis - economics
British Columbia
Costs and Cost Analysis
Diet, Gluten-Free - adverse effects - economics
Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects - economics
Edible Grain - adverse effects - chemistry - economics
Fast Foods - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Flour - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Food Labeling
Frozen Foods - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Humans
Meat Products - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
Nutritive Value
Serving Size
Abstract
There is concern about the nutritional quality of processed gluten-free (GF) products. The aim was to investigate the nutrient composition and cost of processed GF products compared with similar regular products.
Product size, price, caloric value, and macro- and micronutrient composition were compared between foods labeled "Gluten-free" and comparable regular products in 5 grocery stores in 3 Canadian cities. Data were calculated per 100 g of product.
A total of 131 products were studied (71 GF, 60 regular). Overall, calories were comparable between GF and regular foods. However, fat content of GF breads was higher (mean 7.7 vs. 3.6 g, P = 0.003), whereas protein was lower (mean 5.0 vs. 8.0 g, P = 0.001). Mean carbohydrate content of GF pasta was higher (78 vs. 74 g, P = 0.001), whereas protein (7.5 vs. 13.3 g, P
PubMed ID
26067071 View in PubMed
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Source
J Occup Environ Hyg. 2017 Feb;14(2):81-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Jorunn Kirkeleit
Bjørg Eli Hollund
Trond Riise
Wijnand Eduard
Magne Bråtveit
Torgeir Storaas
Source
J Occup Environ Hyg. 2017 Feb;14(2):81-91
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooking
Dust - analysis
Flour
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Abstract
We aimed to characterize bakers' personal exposure to airborne flour dust with respect to the health-related aerosol fractions inhalable, extrathoracic, and thoracic dust, and to examine possible production-related determinants of dust exposure. Sixty-eight bakers from 7 bakeries in Bergen, Norway (2009-2012) participated in the exposure assessment, comprising full-shift personal samples of inhalable dust (n = 107) and thoracic dust (n = 61). The relation between possible determinants and exposure was estimated using mixed effects models, while associations between the various aerosol fractions across task groups and type of bakeries were described by Pearson's correlation coefficients. Bakers' overall geometric mean personal exposure to inhalable, extrathoracic, and thoracic dust were 2.6 mg/m(3) (95% CI: 2.0, 3.2), 2.2 mg/m(3) (95% CI: 1.9, 2.7), and 0.33 mg/m(3) (95% CI 0.3, 0.4), respectively. A total of 29% of the measurements of inhalable dust were above the Norwegian Occupational Exposure Limit of 3 mg/m(3). The exposure variability of inhalable dust could not be explained by any of the examined production-related determinants, while the daily production volume explained 18% of the variance in thoracic dust exposure. Overall, the thoracic dust represented 15% of the inhalable dust, being rather stable across the production-related determinants. The overall correlation between inhalable and thoracic dust was nevertheless moderate (r = 0.52, p
PubMed ID
27540715 View in PubMed
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Bronchial responsiveness in bakery workers: relation to airway symptoms, IgE sensitization, nasal indices of inflammation, flour dust exposure and smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83708
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2007 Sep;27(5):327-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Storaas Torgeir
Irgens Agot
Florvaag Erik
Steinsvåg Sverre K
Ardal Laila
Do Thien Van
Greiff Lennart
Aasen Tor B
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, Norway. torgeir.storaas@helse-bergen.no
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2007 Sep;27(5):327-34
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoconstrictor Agents
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dust
Eosinophils - immunology
Flour - adverse effects
Food-Processing Industry - statistics & numerical data
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Interviews
Methacholine Chloride
Middle Aged
Nasal Lavage Fluid - cytology - immunology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Rhinitis - complications - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) is common in bakery workers. The relation between bronchial responsiveness measured with a tidal breathing method and smoking, airway symptoms, IgE-sensitization, nasal indices of inflammation and flour dust exposure have been studied with bronchial responsiveness expressed as a continuous outcome. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Bakery workers (n = 197) were subjected to interviews, questionnaires, allergy tests, workplace dust measurements and bronchial metacholine provocation. Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and alpha(2)-macroglobulin were measured in nasal lavage. Bronchial responsiveness was expressed as slope(conc), a measurement based on regressing the per cent reduction in FEV(1) at each provocation step. RESULTS: BHR expressed as slope(conc) was associated with smoking (P = 0.009), asthma symptoms at work (P = 0.001), and occupational IgE sensitization (P = 0.048). After adjusting for baseline lung function the association between BHR and IgE sensitization was no longer present. We demonstrated an association between nasal ECP and BHR (slope(conc)
PubMed ID
17697030 View in PubMed
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Carotenoid Content in Organically Produced Wheat: Relevance for Human Nutritional Health on Consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274059
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Nov;12(11):14068-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Abrar Hussain
Hans Larsson
Ramune Kuktaite
Marie E Olsson
Eva Johansson
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Nov;12(11):14068-83
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carotenoids - analysis - genetics
Edible Grain - chemistry - genetics
Flour - analysis
Food, Organic - analysis
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Nutritive Value
Organic Agriculture
Sweden
Triticum - chemistry - genetics
Abstract
In this study, 33 spring and winter wheat genotypes were analyzed for carotenoid content and composition. Investigated genotypes were divided into four genotype groups i.e., spelt, landraces, old cultivars and primitive wheat. The results showed a high level of variation among the genotypes in amount of carotenoids in the grain with high values (around 4 mg/Kg) especially in one of the genotypes-?land 8. Lutein was the most common carotenoid in all the investigated genotypes, contributing 70%-90% of the carotenoids in the grain. Variation in carotenoid content and composition was found not only among genotypes, but also between genotype groups and wheat type, although there is a need to analyze more genotypes to confirm the differences found between groups and types. This study showed that 40% of the daily requirements of lutein can be achieved from the genotypes with the highest lutein content (?land 8) produced using organic farming through the average human consumption of 200 grams of wheat per day. Furthermore, this study showed, by the use of principal component analyses, an opportunity to select genotypes combining high values of certain nutritional compounds. By a further breeding and commercial production of such genotypes, the nutritional value of wheat flour for human consumption can be improved.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26540066 View in PubMed
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Characterization of exposure to inhalable flour dust in Swedish bakeries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15975
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1994 Feb;38(1):67-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
A. Burdorf
L. Lillienberg
J. Brisman
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Sahlgren Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1994 Feb;38(1):67-78
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dust - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Flour
Food Handling
Humans
Occupational Exposure
Proteins - analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
alpha-Amylase - analysis
Abstract
Bakery workers are at risk of developing respiratory symptoms, such as asthma and rhinitis. Exposure to inhalable flour dust in 12 Swedish bakeries was therefore determined: concentrations of airborne inhalable flour dust were measured with the IOM personal inspirable dust sampler and the particle size distribution assessed using the IOM personal inspirable aerosol spectrometer, and the fractions of alpha-amylase, water-soluble protein and total protein in flour dust were determined. A total of 129 measurements were performed of which 77 were repeated measurements. There was a clear hierarchy in geometric mean exposure among bakery workers, with in descending order doughmakers (5.46 mg m-3), bread-formers (2.69 mg m-3), oven workers (1.17 mg m-3), and packers and confectionery workers (0.53 mg m-3). The repeated measurements revealed that within each task group there were considerable differences in mean exposure among the workers: this was demonstrated by geometric standard deviations of between-worker variance of 1.63-1.77. Partitioning of the total variability of inhalable flour dust exposure showed that the task group was the principal source of variance, accounting for 61-69% of the total variability. The optimum grouping strategy was independent of whether the oven workers and the packers were assigned to the same or to different task groups. The doughmakers and the bread-formers are two clearly distinguishable exposure groups with largely overlapping exposure distributions. On average, the flour dust contained 9% total protein, 2.3% water-soluble protein and 0.03% alpha-amylase. The inhalable flour dust was characterized by a substantial proportion of particles with a d(ac) above 10 microns. It was estimated that the thoracic subfraction contributed 39% to the total mass of inhalable dust, and the respirable subfraction 19%.
PubMed ID
8161093 View in PubMed
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59 records – page 1 of 6.