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29 records – page 1 of 3.

Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Alaska Sea Grant
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Vulnerability & Adaptation
Animals
Climate change
Permafrost
Introduced species
Ice
Ecosystem
Floods
Freezing
Abstract
Seventeen-minute video produced by Alaska Sea Grant and NOAA Alaska Region.
Online Resources
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Almost 50 years of monitoring shows that climate, not forestry, controls long-term organic carbon fluxes in a large boreal watershed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262840
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Apr;20(4):1225-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Ahti Lepistö
Martyn N Futter
Pirkko Kortelainen
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Apr;20(4):1225-37
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calibration
Carbon - analysis
Carbon Cycle
Climate
Droughts
Environmental monitoring
Finland
Floods
Forestry
Models, Theoretical
Seasons
Temperature
Abstract
Here, we use a unique long-term data set on total organic carbon (TOC) fluxes, its climatic drivers and effects of land management from a large boreal watershed in northern Finland. TOC and runoff have been monitored at several sites in the Simojoki watershed (3160 km(2) ) since the early 1960s. Annual TOC fluxes have increased significantly together with increased inter-annual variability. Acid deposition in the area has been low and has not significantly influenced losses of TOC. Forest management, including ditching and clear felling, had a minor influence on TOC fluxes - seasonal and long-term patterns in TOC were controlled primarily by changes in soil frost, seasonal precipitation, drought, and runoff. Deeper soil frost led to lower spring TOC concentrations in the river. Summer TOC concentrations were positively correlated with precipitation and soil moisture not temperature. There is some indication that drought conditions led to elevated TOC concentrations and fluxes in subsequent years (1998-2000). A sensitivity analysis of the INCA-C model results showed the importance of landscape position, land-use type, and soil temperature as controls of modeled TOC concentrations. Model predictions were not sensitive to forest management. Our results are contradictory to some earlier plot-scale and small catchment studies that have shown more profound forest management impacts on TOC fluxes. This shows the importance of scale when assessing the mechanisms controlling TOC fluxes and concentrations. The results highlight the value of long-term multiple data sets to better understand ecosystem response to land management, climate change and extremes in northern ecosystems.
PubMed ID
24501106 View in PubMed
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Arctic moistening provides negative feedbacks to riparian plants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296986
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 06; 24(6):2691-2707
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Samuli Helama
Laura Arppe
Kari Mielikäinen
Markku Oinonen
Author Affiliation
Natural Resources Institute Finland, Rovaniemi, Finland.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 06; 24(6):2691-2707
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Biomass
Carbon - metabolism
Carbon Isotopes - analysis
Finland
Floods
Pinus sylvestris - growth & development - metabolism
Abstract
Arctic moistening will affect the circumpolar forested riparian ecosystems. Upward trends observed for precipitation in high latitudes illustrate that the moistening may be underway to influence the woody biomass production near the inland waters, lakes and streams with effects on carbon pools and fluxes. Although the flooding and waterlogging tolerance of seedlings has been investigated, our understanding of responses in mature trees is still limited. Here we employ tree-ring d13 C and width data from a subarctic riparian setting in Lapland, where artificially high lake level (HLL) has already altered the ecophysiological and growth responses of riparian Pinus sylvestris trees to external drivers under conditions simulating moister environment. Prior to the HLL event, the carbon assimilation rate was primarily limited by irradiance as reflected in the d13 C data and the radial growth of south-facing riparian trees remained increased in comparison to shaded upland trees. By contrast, the riparian trees were not similarly benefited during the HLL period when reduced assimilation depleted the riparian in comparison to upland d13 C despite of increased irradiance. As a result, the radial growth of riparian trees was markedly reduced over the HLL event while the upland trees benefited from increased irradiance and summer time warming. Although the production of biomass at high latitudes is commonly considered temperature-limited, our results highlight the increasing role of Arctic moistening to limit the growth when increased precipitation (cloudiness) reduces the incoming solar radiation in general and when the riparian habitat becomes increasingly waterlogged in particular. The effects of high-latitude warming to induce higher biomass productivity may be restricted by negative feedbacks.
PubMed ID
29436149 View in PubMed
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Assessing the robustness of raingardens under climate change using SDSM and temporal downscaling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293433
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2018 Mar; 77(5-6):1640-1650
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Erle Kristvik
Guro Heimstad Kleiven
Jardar Lohne
Tone Merete Muthanna
Author Affiliation
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), S. P. Andersens veg 5, 7491 Trondheim, Norway E-mail: erle.kristvik@ntnu.no.
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2018 Mar; 77(5-6):1640-1650
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cities
Climate change
Drainage, Sanitary
Floods
Norway
Rain
Time Factors
Water Movements
Abstract
Climate change is expected to lead to higher precipitation amounts and intensities causing an increase of the risk for flooding and combined sewer overflows in urban areas. To cope with these changes, water managers are requesting practical tools that can facilitate adaptive planning. This study was carried out to investigate how recent developments in downscaling techniques can be used to assess the effects of adaptive measures. A combined spatial-temporal downscaling methodology using the Statistical DownScaling Model-Decision Centric (SDSM-DC) and the Generalized Extreme Value distribution was applied to project future precipitation in the city of Bergen, Norway. A raingarden was considered a potential adaptive measure, and its performance was assessed using the RECARGA simulation tool. The benefits and limitations of using the proposed method have been demonstrated and compared to current design practices in Norway. Large differences in the raingarden's performance with respect to percentage overflow and lag-time reduction were found for varying projections. This highlights the need for working with a range of possible futures. Further, it was found that Ksat was the determining factor for peak-flow reduction and that different values of Ksat had different benefits. Engineering flexible solutions by combining measures holding different characteristics will induce robust adaptation.
PubMed ID
29595166 View in PubMed
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Broad-scale lake expansion and flooding inundates essential wood bison habitat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295933
Source
Nat Commun. 2017 02 23; 8:14510
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-23-2017
Author
Jennifer B Korosi
Joshua R Thienpont
Michael F J Pisaric
Peter deMontigny
Joelle T Perreault
Jamylynn McDonald
Myrna J Simpson
Terry Armstrong
Steven V Kokelj
John P Smol
Jules M Blais
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N6N5.
Source
Nat Commun. 2017 02 23; 8:14510
Date
02-23-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Bison - physiology
Climate
Conservation of Natural Resources
Ecosystem
Floods
Geography
Geologic sediments
Lakes
Lignin - chemistry
Northwest Territories
Phenols - chemistry
Abstract
Understanding the interaction between the response of a complex ecosystem to climate change and the protection of vulnerable wildlife species is essential for conservation efforts. In the Northwest Territories (Canada), the recent movement of the Mackenzie wood bison herd (Bison bison athabascae) out of their designated territory has been postulated as a response to the loss of essential habitat following regional lake expansion. We show that the proportion of this landscape occupied by water doubled since 1986 and the timing of lake expansion corresponds to bison movements out of the Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary. Historical reconstructions using proxy data in dated sediment cores show that the scale of recent lake expansion is unmatched over at least the last several hundred years. We conclude that recent lake expansion represents a fundamental alteration of the structure and function of this ecosystem and its use by Mackenzie wood bison, in response to climate change.
Notes
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Sep 22;112(38):11789-94 PMID 26351688
Cites: Can J Vet Res. 1993 Oct;57(4):231-5 PMID 8269360
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Jul 24;104(30):12395-7 PMID 17606917
Cites: Conserv Biol. 2009 Oct;23(5):1080-9 PMID 19549219
Cites: Science. 2005 Jun 3;308(5727):1429 PMID 15933192
PubMed ID
28230049 View in PubMed
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Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources (CIER)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288443
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources (CIER)
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Witnesses to Change
Climate change
Floods
Canada
Abstract
CIER was founded in 1994 by a small group of First Nation leaders from across Canada who recognized the need for Aboriginal peoples to have the capacity to solve environmental problems affecting their lands and resources.
Online Resources
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Climate change and health effects in Northwest Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130238
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 6-10.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Alaska Natives are experiencing stress related to rapid cultural change and the loss of social, cultural, and environmental conditions. Climate change can also gen- erate stress and fear related to safety and security. Flooding in the fall of 2007 resulted in evacuation of the entire village of
  1 document  
Author
Michael Brubaker
James Berner
Raj Chavan
John Warren
Author Affiliation
Center for Climate and Health, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, USA. mbrubaker@anthc.org
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 6-10.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
332455
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Climate Change - statistics & numerical data
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology
Floods
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental health
Public Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
This article provides examples of adverse health effects, including weather-related injury, food insecurity, mental health issues, and water infrastructure damage, and the responses to these effects that are currently being applied in two Northwest Alaska communities.
In Northwest Alaska, warming is resulting in a broad range of unusual weather and environmental conditions, including delayed freeze-up, earlier breakup, storm surge, coastal erosion, and thawing permafrost. These are just some of the climate impacts that are driving concerns about weather-related injury, the spread of disease, mental health issues, infrastructure damage, and food and water security. Local leaders are challenged to identify appropriate adaptation strategies to address climate impacts and related health effects. IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: The tribal health system is combining local observations, traditional knowledge, and western science to perform community-specific climate change health impact assessments. Local leaders are applying this information to develop adaptation responses.
The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium will describe relationships between climate impacts and health effects and provide examples of community-scaled adaptation actions currently being applied in Northwest Alaska.
Climate change is increasing vulnerability to injury, disease, mental stress, food insecurity, and water insecurity. Northwest communities are applying adaptation approaches that are both specific and appropriate.
The health impact assessment process is effective in raising awareness, encouraging discussion, engaging partners, and implementing adaptation planning. With community-specific information, local leaders are applying health protective adaptation measures.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Nov;98(11):2072-818382002
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Jun;70(3):266-7321703129
Cites: Int J Public Health. 2010 Apr;55(2):85-9619941059
PubMed ID
22022304 View in PubMed
Documents

Brubaker-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
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Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
U.S. National Library of Medicine
Language
English
Spanish
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Public Health
Climate change
Cold Temperature
Floods
Hot Temperature
Asthma
Mental health
Weather
Climate
Air Pollution
Abstract
Informative materials from The National Library of Medicine.
Online Resources
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Climate change: the next challenge for public mental health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262713
Source
Int Rev Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;26(4):415-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
François Bourque
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Source
Int Rev Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;26(4):415-22
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Climate change
Disasters
Droughts
Environment
Floods
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Mental health
Public Health
Weather
Abstract
Climate change is increasingly recognized as one of the greatest threats to human health of the 21st century, with consequences that mental health professionals are also likely to face. While physical health impacts have been increasingly emphasized in literature and practice, recent scholarly literature indicates that climate change and related weather events and environmental changes can profoundly impact psychological well-being and mental health through both direct and indirect pathways, particularly among those with pre-existing vulnerabilities or those living in ecologically sensitive areas. Although knowledge is still limited about the connections between climate change and mental health, evidence is indicating that impacts may be felt at both the individual and community levels, with mental health outcomes ranging from psychological distress, depression and anxiety, to increased addictions and suicide rates. Drawing on examples from diverse geographical areas, this article highlights some climate-sensitive impacts that may be encountered by mental health professionals. We then suggest potential avenues for public mental health in light of current and projected changes, in order to stimulate thought, debate, and action.
PubMed ID
25137107 View in PubMed
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Community strategies to improve flood risk communication in the Red River Basin, Manitoba, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139252
Source
Disasters. 2011 Jul;35(3):554-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Robert M Stewart
Harun Rashid
Author Affiliation
Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1, Canada.
Source
Disasters. 2011 Jul;35(3):554-76
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Floods
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Abstract
More than a decade after the 1997 Red River Flood, vulnerability to future flooding exists due to a lack of risk communication. This study identifies risk communication gaps and discusses the creation of strategies to enhance information-sharing, bottom-up activity and partnership development. The objectives were achieved using mixed methods, including interviews, a floodplain-wide survey, and a decision-makers' risk management workshop. The results highlight a number of external pressures exerted by regional floodplain policies and procedures that restrict risk communication and affect social vulnerability in the rural floodplain. The failures of a top-down approach to floodplain management have impacted on communities' abilities to address floodplain risks, have amplified local risks, and have decreased community cooperation in floodplain management initiatives since the 1997 'Flood of the Century'. Recommended policies promote the establishment of community standards to compensate for gaps in risk communication and the development of partnerships between floodplain communities.
PubMed ID
21083849 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.