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Antioxidant activity and antimicrobial effect of berry phenolics--a Finnish perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163640
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Jun;51(6):684-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Marina Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Food Chemistry, University of Helsinki, Finland. marina.heinonen@helsinki.fi
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Jun;51(6):684-91
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Infective Agents - pharmacology
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Diet
Finland
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Fruit - chemistry
Health promotion
Humans
Phenols - analysis
Phytotherapy
Abstract
In Finland, berries are part of the traditional diet significantly contributing to the intake of flavonoids and other phenolic compounds. Compositional data on phenolic compounds in berries has been rapidly accumulating and included in the national food composition database. Among the different bioactive substances in berries, phenolic compounds including flavonoids, tannins, and phenolic acids have received considerable interest due to their effects in food and health. A great amount of in vitro evidence exists showing that berry phenolics are powerful antioxidants. However, the antioxidant effect of berry phenolics is strongly dependent on the choice of berry raw material, as the antioxidant activity differs between the different phenolic constituents, including anthocyanins, ellagitannins, and proanthocyanidins. In foods, the antioxidant effect is also influenced by the structure of food. Tannin-containing berries exhibit antimicrobial properties against pathogenic bacteria, thus offering many new applications for food industry. Much of the interest in berry phenolics has focused on cranberries and both cultivated and wild blueberries, although also other berries including black currants, cloudberries, lingonberries, and red raspberries possess promising bioactivities that may have relevance to human health. Antioxidant activity of berry phenolics, in addition to other mechanisms, may contribute to human health, but the possible relationship remains yet to be scientifically substantiated.
PubMed ID
17492800 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical acceptability study of once-daily versus twice-daily micronized purified flavonoid fraction in patients with symptomatic chronic venous disease: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281972
Source
Int Angiol. 2016 Aug;35(4):399-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Alexander Kirienko
Djordje Radak
Source
Int Angiol. 2016 Aug;35(4):399-405
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - chemistry
Chronic Disease
Double-Blind Method
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Compounding
Female
Flavonoids - administration & dosage - adverse effects - chemistry
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Pain Measurement
Russia
Serbia
Tablets
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Venous Insufficiency - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the clinical acceptability of two dose regimens of micronized purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF): a single 1000 mg tablet once daily versus 500 mg twice daily in patients suffering from chronic venous disease (CVD).
In an international, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study, 174 patients (Clinical Etiological Anatomic Pathophysiologic [CEAP] class C0s to C4) were randomized to MPFF 1000 mg once daily or MPFF 500 mg twice daily for 8 weeks. Adverse events (AEs) were recorded in patient-kept diaries (weeks 0, 2, 4, 8) and leg pain was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS).
No serious AEs occurred. A total of 30 treatment-emergent adverse events (EAE) were reported (15 in each group). Three treatment-EAE in the MPFF 1000 mg group (constipation, dyspepsia, allergic dermatitis) were considered by the investigator to be related to treatment. All were of mild intensity and resolved when treatment finished. Both MPFF regimens were associated with a significant reduction in leg pain score with a reduction of 4.21 cm for MPFF 1000 mg once daily (P
PubMed ID
26576663 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary flavonoids and the risk of lung cancer and other malignant neoplasms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207880
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Aug 1;146(3):223-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-1997
Author
P. Knekt
R. Järvinen
R. Seppänen
M. Hellövaara
L. Teppo
E. Pukkala
A. Aromaa
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Aug 1;146(3):223-30
Date
Aug-1-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Diet Surveys
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Fruit
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Flavonoids are effective antioxidants and, in theory, may provide protection against cancer, although direct human evidence of this is scarce. The relation between the intake of antioxidant flavonoids and subsequent risk of cancer was studied among 9,959 Finnish men and women aged 15-99 years and initially cancer free. Food consumption was estimated by the dietary history method, covering the total habitual diet during the previous year. During a follow-up in 1967-1991, 997 cancer cases and 151 lung cancer cases were diagnosed. An inverse association was observed between the intake of flavonoids and incidence of all sites of cancer combined. The sex- and age-adjusted relative risk of all sites of cancer combined between the highest and lowest quartiles of flavonoid intake was 0.80 (95% confidence interval 0.67-0.96). This association was mainly a result of lung cancer, which presented a corresponding relative risk of 0.54 (95% confidence interval 0.34-0.87). The association between flavonoid intake and lung cancer incidence was not due to the intake of antioxidant vitamins or other potential confounding factors, as adjustment for factors such as smoking and intakes of energy, vitamin E, vitamin C, and beta-carotene did not materially alter the results. The association was strongest in persons under 50 years of age and in nonsmokers with relative risks of 0.33 (95% confidence interval 0.15-0.77) and 0.13 (95% confidence interval 0.03-0.58), respectively. Of the major dietary flavonoid sources, the consumption of apples showed an inverse association with lung cancer incidence, with a relative risk of 0.42 (95% confidence interval 0.23-0.76) after adjustment for the intake of other fruits and vegetables. The results are in line with the hypothesis that flavonoid intake in some circumstances may be involved in the cancer process, resulting in lowered risks.
PubMed ID
9247006 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary intake and major food sources of polyphenols in Finnish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158693
Source
J Nutr. 2008 Mar;138(3):562-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Marja-Leena Ovaskainen
Riitta Törrönen
Jani M Koponen
Harri Sinkko
Jarkko Hellström
Heli Reinivuo
Pirjo Mattila
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, Nutrition Unit, National Public Health Institute, FI-00300 Helsinki, Finland. marja-leena.ovaskainen@ktl.fi
Source
J Nutr. 2008 Mar;138(3):562-6
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Availability
Diet
Eating
Female
Finland
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Food
Food analysis
Humans
Male
Phenols - administration & dosage
Polyphenols
Abstract
Phenolic acids, flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, and ellagitannins are polyphenols that may have beneficial effects on human health and provide protection against chronic diseases. To date, limited data exist on quantitative intake of polyphenols. The aims of this study were to estimate the quantitative intakes of polyphenols by using analyzed concentrations together with individual food consumption records and to determine major dietary sources. Analyzed concentrations of phenolic acids, anthocyanidins, and other flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, and ellagitannins (44 total polyphenol compounds) were entered into the national food composition database, Fineli. The absolute intakes of the polyphenols and the corresponding food sources were calculated on the basis of 48-h dietary recalls of 2007 Finnish adults. The mean total intake of polyphenols was 863 +/- 415 mg/d. Phenolic acids comprised the dominant group of polyphenols (75% of total intake) followed by proanthocyanidins (14%) and anthocyanidins and other flavonoids (10%). Due to their high consumption and high concentrations of phenolic acids, coffee and cereals were the main contributors to total polyphenol intake. Berries and berry products were the main source for anthocyanidins, ellagitannins, and proanthocyanidins, and fruits were the main source for flavonols, flavones, and flavanones. The results give additional support to the recommendations for a varied diet with fruits, berries, cereals, and vegetables.
PubMed ID
18287367 View in PubMed
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Dietary phytoestrogens are not associated with risk of overall breast cancer but diets rich in coumestrol are inversely associated with risk of estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor negative breast tumors in Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86899
Source
J Nutr. 2008 May;138(5):938-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Hedelin Maria
Löf Marie
Olsson Marita
Adlercreutz Herman
Sandin Sven
Weiderpass Elisabete
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. maria.hedelin@ki.se
Source
J Nutr. 2008 May;138(5):938-45
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - chemistry - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Coumestrol - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Diet
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Humans
Lignans - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Phytoestrogens - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Receptors, Estrogen - analysis
Receptors, Progesterone - analysis
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Results from epidemiological and experimental studies indicate that phytoestrogens may protect against breast cancer. Because one of the biological effects of phytoestrogens is probably estrogenic, it's possible that the preventive effect on breast cancer differs by estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) status of the tumor. We evaluated the associations between dietary phytoestrogen (isoflavonoids, lignans, and coumestrol) intake and risk of breast cancer and whether the ER/PR statuses of the tumor influence this relationship. In 1991-2 a prospective population-based cohort study among Swedish pre- and postmenopausal women was performed, making questionnaire data available for 45,448 women. A total of 1014 invasive breast cancers were diagnosed until December 2004. Cox proportional hazards models were performed to estimate multivariate risk ratios, 95% CI for associations with risk of breast cancer. Intakes of lignan, isoflavonoid, or coumestrol were not associated with breast cancer risk overall or before or after 50 y of age. The effects of lignans or isoflavonoids were independent of receptor status. However, intake of coumestrol was associated with decreased risk of receptor negative tumors (ER-PR-) but not positive tumors. The risk of ER-PR- tumors was significantly lower (50%) in women with intermediate coumestrol intake compared with those who did not consume any. In conclusion, we found no association between intake of isoflavonoids or lignans and breast cancer risk. Our results of a decreased risk of ER-PR- tumors in women with intermediate intake of coumestrol could be due to chance because of the low intake. The results should be confirmed in other studies.
PubMed ID
18424605 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dose-dependent hypocholesterolemic actions of dietary apple polyphenol in rats fed cholesterol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83655
Source
Lipids. 2006 Feb;41(2):133-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Osada Kyoichi
Suzuki Takashi
Kawakami Yuki
Senda Mineo
Kasai Atsushi
Sami Manabu
Ohta Yutaka
Kanda Tomomasa
Ikeda Mitsuo
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Agriculture and Life Science, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8224, Japan. kyochi@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp
Source
Lipids. 2006 Feb;41(2):133-9
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anticholesteremic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Body Weight - drug effects
Cholesterol 7-alpha-Hydroxylase - metabolism
Cholesterol, Dietary
Feces - chemistry
Flavonoids - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Lipids - blood
Liver - drug effects
Male
Malus - chemistry
Organ Size - drug effects
Phenols - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Steroids - metabolism
Abstract
The dose-dependent hypocholesterolemic and antiatherogenic effects of dietary apple polyphenol (AP) from unripe apple, which contains approximately 85% catechin oligomers (procyanidins), were examined in male Sprague-Dawley rats (4 wk of age) given a purified diet containing 0.5% cholesterol. Dietary AP at 0.5 and 1.0% levels significantly decreased the liver cholesterol level compared with that in the control (AP-free diet-fed) group. Dietary AP also significantly lowered the serum cholesterol level compared with that in the control group. However, the HDL cholesterol level was significantly higher in the 1.0% AP-fed group than in the control group. Accordingly, the ratio of HDL-cholesterol/total cholesterol was significantly higher in the 0.5% AP-fed group and 1.0% AP-fed group than in the control group. Moreover, the atherogenic indices in the 0.5 and 1.0% AP-fed groups were significantly lower than those in the control group. The activity of hepatic cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase tended to be increased by dietary AP in a dose-dependent manner. In accord with this observation, dietary AP increased the excretion of acidic steroids in feces. Dietary AP also significantly promoted the fecal excretion of neutral steroids in a dose-dependent manner. These observations suggest that dietary AP at a 0.5 or 1.0% level exerts hypocholesterolemic and antiatherogenic effects through the promotion of cholesterol catabolism and inhibition of intestinal absorption of cholesterol.
PubMed ID
17707979 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Effect of plant biocomposites based on Georgian tea "per se" and in combination with cisplatin on Walker carcinosarcoma W-256 and Guerin's carcinoma growth rate in rats]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78109
Source
Lik Sprava. 2006 Dec;(8):89-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Zalietok S P
Orlovs'kyi O A
Hohol' S V
Samoilenko O A
Hulua L.
Kvesitadze H I
Source
Lik Sprava. 2006 Dec;(8):89-93
Date
Dec-2006
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic - administration & dosage - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Carcinoma 256, Walker - drug therapy
Cell Line, Tumor
Cisplatin - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor
Female
Flavonoids - administration & dosage - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Neoplasm Transplantation
Neoplasms, Experimental - drug therapy
Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent - drug therapy
Phenols - administration & dosage - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Tea - chemistry
Abstract
Green tea biocomposite had effectivey hampered the growth of rat Walker W-256 carcinoma and in less extent rat Guerin's carcinoma. Black tea biocomposite had not practically influenced on Guerin's carcinoma growth. The biocomposite from green tea and extract from red vine rind and lemon suppressed at the level of tendency the growth of rat Walker W-256 carcinoma. The biocomposite from green tea and extract from red vine rind had hampered only Guerin's carcinoma growth and at the tendency had increased the growth of W-256 carcinosarcoma growth. This biocomposite increased also considerably the therapeutic efficiency of cisplatin on Guerin's carcinoma. Studed vegetable biocomposites posesses antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties.
PubMed ID
17427433 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fish, vitamin D, and flavonoids in relation to renal cell cancer among smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149325
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Sep 15;170(6):717-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2009
Author
Robin Taylor Wilson
Jiangyue Wang
Vernon Chinchilli
John P Richie
Jarmo Virtamo
Lee E Moore
Demetrius Albanes
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Division, Department of Public Health Sciences, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania 17033-0855, USA. rwilson@psu.edu
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Sep 15;170(6):717-29
Date
Sep-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Finland - epidemiology
Fish Products
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Nutritional Status
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Quercetin - administration & dosage
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Smoking - adverse effects
Statistics as Topic
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
Fish, vitamin D, flavonoids, and flavonoid-containing foods may have cardiovascular benefits and therefore may also reduce the risk of renal cell cancer. Risk was prospectively assessed in the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (1985-2002) cohort (N = 27,111; 15.2 mean person-years of follow-up). At enrollment, demographic, health, and dietary history information was recorded. Individuals who smoked less than 5 cigarettes/day, with chronic renal insufficiency or prior cancer, were excluded. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals from Cox regression were used to compare upper quartiles (quartiles 2-4) with the lowest quartile (quartile 1) of dietary intake. Among 228 cases, risk (quartile 4 vs. quartile 1) was associated with consumption of the flavonoid quercetin (hazard ratio = 0.6, 95% confidence interval: 0.4, 0.9; P(trend) = 0.015) and Baltic herring (hazard ratio = 2.0, 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 3.0; P(trend)
Notes
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PubMed ID
19651663 View in PubMed
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Flavonoid intake and coronary mortality in Finland: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212623
Source
BMJ. 1996 Feb 24;312(7029):478-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-1996
Author
P. Knekt
R. Jarvinen
A. Reunanen
J. Maatela
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 1996 Feb 24;312(7029):478-81
Date
Feb-24-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Allium
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - mortality
Diet
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quercetin - administration & dosage
Risk factors
Abstract
To study the association between dietary intake of flavonoids and subsequent coronary mortality.
A cohort study based on data collected at the Finnish mobile clinic health examination survey from 1967-72 and followed up until 1992.
30 communities from different parts of Finland.
5133 Finnish men and women aged 30-69 years and free from heart disease at baseline.
Dietary intake of flavonoids, total mortality, and coronary mortality.
In women a significant inverse gradient was observed between dietary intake of flavonoids and total and coronary mortality. The relative risks between highest and lowest quarters of flavonoid intake adjusted for age, smoking, serum cholesterol concentration, blood pressure, and body mass index were 0.69 (95% confidence interval 0.53 to 0.90) and 0.54 (0.33 to 0.87) for total and coronary mortality, respectively. The corresponding values for men were 0.76 (0.63 to 0.93) and 0.78 (0.56 to 1.08), respectively. Adjustment for intake of antioxidant vitamins and fatty acids weakened the associations for women; the relative risks for coronary heart disease were 0.73 (0.41 to 1.32) and 0.67 (0.44 to 1.00) in women and men, respectively. Intakes of onions and apples, the main dietary sources of flavonoids, presented similar associations. The relative risks for coronary mortality between highest and lowest quarters of apple intake were 0.57 (0.36 to 0.91) and 0.81 (0.61 to 1.09) for women and men, respectively. The corresponding values for onions were 0.50 (0.30 to 0.82) and 0.74 (0.53 to 1.02), respectively.
The results suggest that people with very low intakes of flavonoids have higher risks of coronary disease.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8597679 View in PubMed
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Flavonoid intake and risk of pancreatic cancer in male smokers (Finland).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158225
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Mar;17(3):553-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Gerd Bobe
Stephanie J Weinstein
Demetrius Albanes
Tero Hirvonen
Jason Ashby
Phil R Taylor
Jarmo Virtamo
Rachael Z Stolzenberg-Solomon
Author Affiliation
Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Department of Health and Human Services, 6120 Executive Boulevard, Room 3022, Rockville, MD 20852-7232, USA.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Mar;17(3):553-62
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Double-Blind Method
Finland - epidemiology
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Extending research on the protective effect of flavonoids in cell culture and animal studies, we examined the association between consumption of flavonoids and flavonoid-rich foods and development of exocrine pancreatic cancer within the alpha-Tocopherol, beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study cohort. Of the 27,111 healthy male smokers (50-69 years) who completed a self-administered dietary questionnaire at baseline, 306 developed exocrine pancreatic cancer during follow-up (1985-2004; median, 16.1 years). Intakes of total flavonoids, three flavonoid subgroups, seven individual flavonoids, and flavonoid-rich foods were estimated from a validated food frequency questionnaire. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Overall, flavonoid intake was not significantly associated with pancreatic cancer. However, in stratified analysis, greater total flavonoid intake was associated with decreased pancreatic cancer risk in participants randomized during the trial to placebo (fourth versus first quartile: hazard ratio, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.78; P trend = 0.009) and not to supplemental alpha-tocopherol (50 mg/d) and/or beta-carotene (20 mg/d; P interaction = 0.002). Similar patterns and significant interactions were observed for flavonols, flavan-3-ols, kaempferol, quercetin, catechin, and epicatechin. Our data suggest that a flavonoid-rich diet may decrease pancreatic cancer risk in male smokers not consuming supplemental alpha-tocopherol and/or beta-carotene.
PubMed ID
18349272 View in PubMed
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