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An analysis of the respiratory health status among seafarers in the Russian trawler and merchant fleets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133568
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2011 Dec;54(12):971-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Olga Shiryaeva
Lisbeth Aasmoe
Bjørn Straume
Berit Elisabeth Bang
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsoe, Tromsoe, Norway; Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital North Norway, Tromsoe, Norway. Olga.Shiryaeva@uit.no
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2011 Dec;54(12):971-9
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nitric Oxide - toxicity
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Russia - epidemiology
Ships
Abstract
Trawler fishermen and merchant seafarers have tough working conditions. While workers in both occupations are exposed to a challenging environment, trawler fishermen are also engaged in onboard fish processing, which is considered to be additional exposure. The aim of the present study was to characterize respiratory health status in both groups of seamen.
In total 127 trawler fishermen and 118 merchant seafarers were enrolled during their regular medical health examinations. The study protocol comprised a standardized questionnaire, lung function test and measurements of fractional nitric oxide concentrations (FE(NO) ) in exhaled air.
Doctor-diagnosed asthma was reported only by trawler fishermen (3.9%, P?
PubMed ID
21692095 View in PubMed
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[An evaluation of the terms used in studying the medical problems of population migration and its classification in foci of opisthorchiasis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225439
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1991 Nov;(11):33-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
Author
V Ia Pustovalova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1991 Nov;(11):33-5
Date
Nov-1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Continental Population Groups
Cooking
Disease Reservoirs - statistics & numerical data
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Fishes - parasitology
Food Parasitology
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group - classification
Opisthorchiasis - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission
Sex Factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Terminology as Topic
Time Factors
Transients and Migrants - classification
Abstract
On the basis of some epidemiological criteria, the work gives grounds for distinguishing the category of "new settlers" among the whole number of "newcomers". The time necessary for the social adaptation of new settlers is estimated, which makes it possible to take them into account together with permanent residents. The scheme of the division of the population according to the duration of their residence in the endemic area is proposed.
Notes
Erratum In: Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol 1992 Feb;(2):following 77
PubMed ID
1811385 View in PubMed
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Assessing the potential for competition between Pacific Halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) and Arrowtooth Flounder (Atheresthes stomias) in the Gulf of Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300311
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(12):e0209402
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Cheryl L Barnes
Anne H Beaudreau
Mary E Hunsicker
Lorenzo Ciannelli
Author Affiliation
College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Juneau, Alaska, United States of America.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(12):e0209402
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Alaska
Animal Distribution - physiology
Animals
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Flounder - physiology
Models, Spatial Interaction
Spatial Behavior - physiology
Abstract
Pacific Halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) support culturally and economically important fisheries in the Gulf of Alaska, though recent decreases in mean size-at-age have substantially reduced fishery yields, generating concerns among stakeholders and resource managers. Among the prevailing hypotheses for reduced size-at-age is intensified competition with Arrowtooth Flounder (Atheresthes stomias), a groundfish predator that exhibited nearly five-fold increases in biomass between the 1960s and mid-2010s. To assess the potential for competition between Pacific Halibut and Arrowtooth Flounder, we evaluated their degree of spatiotemporal and dietary overlap in the Gulf of Alaska using bottom trawl survey and food habits data provided by the Alaska Fisheries Science Center (NOAA; 1990 to 2017). We restricted analyses to fish measuring 30 to 69 cm fork length and used a delta modeling approach to quantify species-specific presence-absence and catch-per-unit-effort as a function of survey year, tow location, depth, and bottom temperature. We then calculated an index of spatial overlap across a uniform grid by multiplying standardized predictions of species' abundance. Dietary overlap was calculated across the same uniform grid using Schoener's similarity index. Finally, we assessed the relationship between spatial and dietary overlap as a measure of resource partitioning. We found increases in spatial overlap, moving from east to west in the Gulf of Alaska (eastern: 0.13 ± 0.20; central: 0.21 ± 0.11; western: 0.31 ± 0.13 SD). Dietary overlap was low throughout the study area (0.13 ± 0.20 SD). There was no correlation between spatial and dietary overlap, suggesting an absence of resource partitioning along the niche dimensions examined. This finding provides little indication that competition with Arrowtooth Flounder was responsible for changes in Pacific Halibut alHHsize-at-age in the Gulf of Alaska; however, it does not rule out competitive interactions that may have affected resource use prior to standardized data collection or at different spatiotemporal scales.
PubMed ID
30562389 View in PubMed
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Balancing risks in the management of contaminated first nations fisheries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186624
Source
Int J Environ Health Res. 2002 Dec;12(4):331-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Clare L S Wiseman
Frank A P C Gobas
Author Affiliation
Center for Environmental Research, JW University Frankfurt, Georg-Voigt-Str 14, 60054 Frankfurt am Main, Germany. wiseman@kristall.uni-frankfurt.de
Source
Int J Environ Health Res. 2002 Dec;12(4):331-42
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
British Columbia - epidemiology
Dioxins - toxicity
Ethnic Groups
Female
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Food Contamination
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Risk Management
Shellfish
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
In the 1980s and 1990s, the Government of Canada closed and/or issued advisories for a number of shellfish fisheries in coastal areas of British Columbia because of dioxin contamination. Only the direct health risks (i.e., cancer) of consuming contaminated shellfish for the general population were considered by the Government in the formulation of risk management options. A focus on the direct risks does not provide an adequate basis for risk decisions as the countervailing risks which may be created from management measures may easily be overlooked. This study describes the potential health impacts of risk management options for aboriginal coastal peoples in the management of dioxin contamination. Gold River and Powell River in British Columbia, Canada, are the areas of focus. The cancer risks of consuming dioxin contaminated shellfish for these sites are estimated. To assess the countervailing risks of management decisions for comparison, a scenario was developed in which First Nations peoples substitute shellfish with store-bought foods in their diets in the event of a fishery closure or advisory. Increases in mortality due to coronary heart disease are estimated. The results suggest that the health risks of dietary changes among aboriginal peoples may be as significant as those related to eating dioxin contaminated shellfish.
PubMed ID
12590781 View in PubMed
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Bottom trawl fishing footprints on the world's continental shelves.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296516
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 10 23; 115(43):E10275-E10282
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
10-23-2018
Author
Ricardo O Amoroso
C Roland Pitcher
Adriaan D Rijnsdorp
Robert A McConnaughey
Ana M Parma
Petri Suuronen
Ole R Eigaard
Francois Bastardie
Niels T Hintzen
Franziska Althaus
Susan Jane Baird
Jenny Black
Lene Buhl-Mortensen
Alexander B Campbell
Rui Catarino
Jeremy Collie
James H Cowan
Deon Durholtz
Nadia Engstrom
Tracey P Fairweather
Heino O Fock
Richard Ford
Patricio A Gálvez
Hans Gerritsen
María Eva Góngora
Jessica A González
Jan G Hiddink
Kathryn M Hughes
Steven S Intelmann
Chris Jenkins
Patrik Jonsson
Paulus Kainge
Mervi Kangas
Johannes N Kathena
Stefanos Kavadas
Rob W Leslie
Steve G Lewis
Mathieu Lundy
David Makin
Julie Martin
Tessa Mazor
Genoveva Gonzalez-Mirelis
Stephen J Newman
Nadia Papadopoulou
Paulette E Posen
Wayne Rochester
Tommaso Russo
Antonello Sala
Jayson M Semmens
Cristina Silva
Angelo Tsolos
Bart Vanelslander
Corey B Wakefield
Brent A Wood
Ray Hilborn
Michel J Kaiser
Simon Jennings
Author Affiliation
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195; ramoroso@u.washington.edu.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 10 23; 115(43):E10275-E10282
Date
10-23-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Australia
Biodiversity
Chile
Ecosystem
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Invertebrates - physiology
New Zealand
Oceans and Seas
Seafood - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Bottom trawlers land around 19 million tons of fish and invertebrates annually, almost one-quarter of wild marine landings. The extent of bottom trawling footprint (seabed area trawled at least once in a specified region and time period) is often contested but poorly described. We quantify footprints using high-resolution satellite vessel monitoring system (VMS) and logbook data on 24 continental shelves and slopes to 1,000-m depth over at least 2 years. Trawling footprint varied markedly among regions: from 50% in some European seas. Overall, 14% of the 7.8 million-km2 study area was trawled, and 86% was not trawled. Trawling activity was aggregated; the most intensively trawled areas accounting for 90% of activity comprised 77% of footprint on average. Regional swept area ratio (SAR; ratio of total swept area trawled annually to total area of region, a metric of trawling intensity) and footprint area were related, providing an approach to estimate regional trawling footprints when high-resolution spatial data are unavailable. If SAR was =0.1, as in 8 of 24 regions, there was >95% probability that >90% of seabed was not trawled. If SAR was 7.9, equal to the highest SAR recorded, there was >95% probability that >70% of seabed was trawled. Footprints were smaller and SAR was =0.25 in regions where fishing rates consistently met international sustainability benchmarks for fish stocks, implying collateral environmental benefits from sustainable fishing.
PubMed ID
30297399 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence and mortality among Swedish Baltic Sea fishermen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24399
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1992 Aug;18(4):217-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1992
Author
L. Hagmar
K. Lindén
A. Nilsson
B. Norrving
B. Akesson
A. Schütz
T. Möller
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1992 Aug;18(4):217-24
Date
Aug-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Cerebrovascular Disorders - etiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A 25% lower cancer mortality was found for 1360 Swedish fishermen who fished on the Baltic Sea than for the general population. The fishermen consumed twice as much fish as the population in the same county. In spite of the low overall cancer mortality, increased mortality from myeloma, as well as increased incidences of gastric carcinoma and squamous cell cancer of the skin and lips, was observed in the cohort. The decrease in risk for ischemic heart disease was not significant. Whether the dietary intake of fatty acids and selenium from fish contributed to the decreased risk was difficult to evaluate. Moreover, whether the consumption of fish from the Baltic Sea, contaminated with, for example, polychlorinated dioxins and dibenzofurans and other persistent organochlorine substances, contributed to the observed increased specific cancer risks is not known. However, the net health effect of high fish consumption from the Baltic Sea seems to be positive.
PubMed ID
1411363 View in PubMed
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Catch estimation with restricted randomization in the effort survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194302
Source
Biometrics. 2001 Jun;57(2):461-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
P C Dauk
C J Schwarz
Author Affiliation
Department of Mathematics, Malaspina College, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Biometrics. 2001 Jun;57(2):461-8
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
British Columbia
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Fishes
Humans
Observer Variation
Random Allocation
Sampling Studies
Abstract
One common method for estimating total catch is to multiply an estimate for CPUE, the catch per unit effort, by an estimate of total effort obtained from an independent second survey. In general, estimating total effort requires that sample times are chosen at random over the full fishing period; however, in practice, this may not always be possible and the usual estimator may be severely biased. Such a restriction in randomization is likely when aircraft are used to make instantaneous counts of fishing activity. This article proposes alternate estimators for use with both access and roving designs in conjunction with effort surveys for which sample times are not random. Ratio type estimators based on activity counts are developed under various scenarios and their performance examined under simulation. In addition, optimizing strategies for use with multiple activity counts are explored. Finally, data from an in-river gill net fishery on the Fraser River is used to illustrate these results.
PubMed ID
11414570 View in PubMed
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Catching the right wave: evaluating wave energy resources and potential compatibility with existing marine and coastal uses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119059
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(11):e47598
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Choong-Ki Kim
Jodie E Toft
Michael Papenfus
Gregory Verutes
Anne D Guerry
Marry H Ruckelshaus
Katie K Arkema
Gregory Guannel
Spencer A Wood
Joanna R Bernhardt
Heather Tallis
Mark L Plummer
Benjamin S Halpern
Malin L Pinsky
Michael W Beck
Francis Chan
Kai M A Chan
Phil S Levin
Stephen Polasky
Author Affiliation
The Natural Capital Project, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America. ckim3@stanford.edu
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(11):e47598
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
British Columbia
Conservation of Natural Resources
Decision Support Techniques
Electricity
Environment
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Oceans and Seas
Renewable Energy - economics
Software
Water Movements
Abstract
Many hope that ocean waves will be a source for clean, safe, reliable and affordable energy, yet wave energy conversion facilities may affect marine ecosystems through a variety of mechanisms, including competition with other human uses. We developed a decision-support tool to assist siting wave energy facilities, which allows the user to balance the need for profitability of the facilities with the need to minimize conflicts with other ocean uses. Our wave energy model quantifies harvestable wave energy and evaluates the net present value (NPV) of a wave energy facility based on a capital investment analysis. The model has a flexible framework and can be easily applied to wave energy projects at local, regional, and global scales. We applied the model and compatibility analysis on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada to provide information for ongoing marine spatial planning, including potential wave energy projects. In particular, we conducted a spatial overlap analysis with a variety of existing uses and ecological characteristics, and a quantitative compatibility analysis with commercial fisheries data. We found that wave power and harvestable wave energy gradually increase offshore as wave conditions intensify. However, areas with high economic potential for wave energy facilities were closer to cable landing points because of the cost of bringing energy ashore and thus in nearshore areas that support a number of different human uses. We show that the maximum combined economic benefit from wave energy and other uses is likely to be realized if wave energy facilities are sited in areas that maximize wave energy NPV and minimize conflict with existing ocean uses. Our tools will help decision-makers explore alternative locations for wave energy facilities by mapping expected wave energy NPV and helping to identify sites that provide maximal returns yet avoid spatial competition with existing ocean uses.
Notes
Cites: Mar Environ Res. 2010 Jun;69(5):374-8120138659
Cites: Mar Environ Res. 2009 Oct;68(4):151-719560811
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Mar 20;109(12):4696-70122392996
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(1):e3003122253865
PubMed ID
23144824 View in PubMed
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Classification of working processes to facilitate occupational hazard coding on industrial trawlers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183599
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Oct;44(4):424-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Olaf C Jensen
Søren Stage
Preben Noer
Linda Kaerlev
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Maritime Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark. OJ@FMM.SDU.dk
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Oct;44(4):424-30
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Forms and Records Control
Humans
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - classification
Risk assessment
Risk Management
Safety Management - methods - organization & administration
Ships - methods
Work - classification
Wounds and injuries - classification - epidemiology
Abstract
Commercial fishing is an extremely dangerous economic activity. In order to more accurately describe the risks involved, a specific injury coding based on the working process was developed.
Observation on six different types of vessels was conducted and allowed a description and a classification of the principal working processes on all kinds of vessels and a detailed classification for industrial trawlers. In industrial trawling, fish are landed for processing purposes, for example, for the production of fish oil and fish meal. The classification was subsequently used to code the injuries reported to the Danish Maritime Authority over a 5-year period.
On industrial trawlers, 374 of 394 (95%) injuries were captured by the classification. Setting out and hauling in the gear and nets were the processes with the most injuries and accounted for 58.9% of all injuries. A relatively large number of injuries occurred when embarking and disembarking. Specific risks were identified in a number of other working processes.
Specific areas for risk prevention in fishery may be identified by using a detailed classification system that takes both the specific method of fishing and the working processes into consideration.
PubMed ID
14502771 View in PubMed
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Commercial fishing deaths - United States, 2000-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96344
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010 Jul 16;59(27):842-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-16-2010
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010 Jul 16;59(27):842-5
Date
Jul-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - mortality - prevention & control
Accidents, Occupational - mortality - prevention & control
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Commerce
Female
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Ships
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Commercial fishing is one of the most dangerous occupations in the United States. During 1992-2008, an annual average of 58 reported deaths occurred (128 deaths per 100,000 workers), compared with an average of 5,894 deaths (four per 100,000 workers) among all U.S. workers. During the 1990s, safety interventions addressing specific hazards identified in Alaska resulted in a significant decline in the state's commercial fishing fatality rate. During 2007-2010, CDC expanded surveillance of commercial fishing fatalities to the rest of the country's fishing areas. To review the hazards and risk factors for occupational mortality in the U.S. commercial fishing industry, and to explore how hazards and risk factors differ among fisheries and locations, CDC collected and analyzed data on each fatality reported during 2000-2009. This report summarizes the results, which showed that, among the 504 U.S. commercial fishing deaths, the majority occurred after a vessel disaster (261 deaths, 52%) or a fall overboard (155 deaths, 31%). By region, 133 (26%) deaths occurred off the coast of Alaska, 124 (25%) in the Northeast, 116 (23%) in the Gulf of Mexico, 83 (16%) off the West Coast, and 41 (8%) in the Mid- and South Atlantic. Type of fishing was known in 478 deaths; shellfish (226, 47%) was the most common, followed by groundfish (144, 30%) and pelagic fish (97, 20%). To reduce fatalities in this industry, additional prevention measures tailored to specific high-risk fisheries and focusing on prevention of vessel disasters and falls overboard are needed.
PubMed ID
20631673 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.