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[Typhoid fever in the district of Outer Nordhordland. Ways of transmission, incidence and mortality 1854-1883]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36222
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jun 20;113(16):1990-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1993
Author
H. Sandvik
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for allmennmedisin Institutt for samfunnsmedisinske fag, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jun 20;113(16):1990-3
Date
Jun-20-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - history
English Abstract
Family Practice - history
Fisheries - history
History, 19th Century
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Middle Aged
Norway
Portraits
Typhoid Fever - epidemiology - history - mortality - transmission
Abstract
Typhoid fever was endemic and unmatched in causing the heaviest workload for the local doctors. Around 1870 the incidence suddenly dropped by 2/3. Before that it had been highest in April and subsequent months. After 1870 typhoid fever became most prevalent in the winter, as in other places. The reason for this shift in incidence was probably the cessation of the spring herring fisheries, from which many fishermen used to return with typhoid. The case fatality rate was approximately 5%, only half of that found elsewhere, and what is regarded as a normal case fatality rate for untreated typhoid fever. This was probably due to the endemic state of the disease. Sick infants probably died undiagnosed while older children may have developed milder forms of the disease. Most deaths were found among adolescents and young adults.
PubMed ID
8322349 View in PubMed
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