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5th Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference and Forum (2012) : "Resilience in a changing world". [Abstract book]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297025
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2012
Fairbanks. Keynote Speaker 7 Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012 Plenary Speaker Daniel Schindler, PhD Professor, Aquatic & Fishery Sciences/Department of Biology, University of Washington
  1 document  
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
3624398
Keywords
Alaska
Fisheries
Marine science
Traditional knowledge
Subsistence
Sustainable energy
Waste disposal
Food security
Ecosystems
Education
Documents
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A 6-year longitudinal study of caries in teenagers and the effect of "dropouts" on the findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139575
Source
Community Dent Health. 2010 Sep;27(3):172-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
I B Arnadóttir
W P Holbrook
H. Agústsdóttir
S R Saemundsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Odontology, University of Iceland Reykjavík, Iceland. iarnad@hi.is
Source
Community Dent Health. 2010 Sep;27(3):172-7
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - radiography
Fisheries
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Patient Dropouts - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Subjects - psychology
Risk-Taking
Rural Population
Urban Population
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate attrition of subjects in a longitudinal study of caries.
A radiographic study of caries and caries-associated factors was carried out in subjects, initially aged 14 years, and followed-up for six years. Attrition of subjects occurred at the last stage of the study.
A nationwide survey of subjects living in fishing, rural farming, and urban communities in Iceland.
A sub-sample of the nationwide random sample comprising 150 subjects was investigated using bitewing radiographs and a structured questionnaire to determine caries-risk factors. Subjects were re-examined at 16 years and 20 years using the same methods.
Mean caries increment from 14-16 years was 3.0 lesions (1.5 lesions/subject/year) but reduced to 2.6 lesions (0.7 lesions/subject/ year) by 20y. The proportion of subjects found to be caries-free at 14 years, 16 years and 20 years, was 29%, 17% and 10%, respectively. "Dropouts" from this study occurred mostly after 16 years. Analysis of subjects dropping out showed that they were least likely to be from the rural farming community but most likely from the fishing community. Those dropping out attended their dentist less frequently, had a higher consumption of carbonated drinks and a higher prevalence and incidence of caries by 16 years.
Subjects with high-risk behaviours, or residents in a fishing community were more likely to drop out of the study. Recognised advantages of conducting longitudinal studies of caries may, therefore, be lost.
PubMed ID
21046910 View in PubMed
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[About life, work and health problems of fishermen employed by PPP and H "Dalmor" SA., fishing at the Sea of Okhotsk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216598
Source
Med Pr. 1995;46(3):309-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

Absence of cardiovascular benefits and sportfish consumption among St. Lawrence River anglers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182864
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Nov;93(3):241-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Catherine Godin
Bryna Shatenstein
Gilles Paradis
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
Département de Médecine Sociale et préventive, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. catherine.godin@bigfoot.com
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Nov;93(3):241-7
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Diet
Dietary Fats
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - pharmacology
Fisheries
Fishes
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Seasons
Abstract
The benefits of sportfish consumption and omega-3 fatty acid (omega3-FA) intake for cardiovascular risk factors were evaluated in a sample of 112 male fishers from the St. Lawrence River in the Montreal area during the 1996 winter and fall fishing seasons. A questionnaire on fishing practices and fish consumption was administered, and fasting blood samples were collected for lipid and phospholipid determination. Linear regression analyses, which considered the confounding effect of major risk factors, did not show any significant association between measured omega3-FAs or reported fish intake and blood lipids or blood pressure. This study is limited by its low statistical power due to the small sample size and the possibility that the fish eaten by the participants were low in omega3-FAs or that the participants diets contained foods high in cholesterol-raising fat.
PubMed ID
14615233 View in PubMed
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Adaptive governance, ecosystem management, and natural capital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267187
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Jun 16;112(24):7369-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-16-2015
Author
Lisen Schultz
Carl Folke
Henrik Österblom
Per Olsson
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Jun 16;112(24):7369-74
Date
Jun-16-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Birds
Conservation of Natural Resources - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Decision Making
Ecosystem
Europe
Fisheries
Maine
Marine Biology - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Nephropidae
Sweden
Abstract
To gain insights into the effects of adaptive governance on natural capital, we compare three well-studied initiatives; a landscape in Southern Sweden, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, and fisheries in the Southern Ocean. We assess changes in natural capital and ecosystem services related to these social-ecological governance approaches to ecosystem management and investigate their capacity to respond to change and new challenges. The adaptive governance initiatives are compared with other efforts aimed at conservation and sustainable use of natural capital: Natura 2000 in Europe, lobster fisheries in the Gulf of Maine, North America, and fisheries in Europe. In contrast to these efforts, we found that the adaptive governance cases developed capacity to perform ecosystem management, manage multiple ecosystem services, and monitor, communicate, and respond to ecosystem-wide changes at landscape and seascape levels with visible effects on natural capital. They enabled actors to collaborate across diverse interests, sectors, and institutional arrangements and detect opportunities and problems as they developed while nurturing adaptive capacity to deal with them. They all spanned local to international levels of decision making, thus representing multilevel governance systems for managing natural capital. As with any governance system, internal changes and external drivers of global impacts and demands will continue to challenge the long-term success of such initiatives.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26082542 View in PubMed
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Aeromonas salmonicida infection levels in pre- and post-stocked cleaner fish assessed by culture and an amended qPCR assay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282184
Source
J Fish Dis. 2016 Jul;39(7):867-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
S. Gulla
S. Duodu
A. Nilsen
I. Fossen
D J Colquhoun
Source
J Fish Dis. 2016 Jul;39(7):867-77
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aeromonas salmonicida - isolation & purification
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial - veterinary
Fisheries
Furunculosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission - veterinary
Norway - epidemiology
Perciformes
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Abstract
Due to increasing resistance to chemical therapeutants, the use of 'cleaner fish' (primarily wrasse, Labridae, species) has become popular in European salmon farming for biocontrol of the salmon louse, Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer). While being efficient de-licers, cleaner fish mortality levels in salmon cages are commonly high, and systemic bacterial infections constitute a major problem. Atypical furunculosis, caused by Aeromonas salmonicida A-layer types V and VI, is among the most common diagnoses reached in clinical investigations. A previously described real-time PCR (qPCR), targeting the A. salmonicida A-layer gene (vapA), was modified and validated for specific and sensitive detection of all presently recognized A-layer types of this bacterium. Before stocking and during episodes of increased mortality in salmon cages, cleaner fish (primarily wild-caught wrasse) were sampled and screened for A. salmonicida by qPCR and culture. Culture indicated that systemic bacterial infections are mainly contracted after salmon farm stocking, and qPCR revealed A. salmonicida prevalences of approximately 4% and 68% in pre- and post-stocked cleaner fish, respectively. This underpins A. salmonicida's relevance as a contributing factor to cleaner fish mortality and emphasizes the need for implementation of preventive measures (e.g. vaccination) if current levels of cleaner fish use are to be continued or expanded.
PubMed ID
26514414 View in PubMed
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Alternative perspectives on the sustainability of Alaska's commercial fisheries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120599
Source
Conserv Biol. 2013 Feb;27(1):55-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Philip A Loring
Author Affiliation
The Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, University of Alaska Fairbanks, PO Box 755910, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA. ploring@alaska.edu
Source
Conserv Biol. 2013 Feb;27(1):55-63
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Conservation of Natural Resources
Fisheries
Food Supply
Humans
Indians, North American
Models, Theoretical
Social Marginalization
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Many believe commercial fisheries in Alaska (U.S.A.) are sustainability success stories, but ongoing socioeconomic problems across the state raise questions about how this sustainability is being defined and evaluated. Problems such as food insecurity and the disenfranchisement of Alaska Natives from fishing rights are well documented, yet these concerns are obscured by marketing campaigns that convey images of flourishing fishing communities and initiatives to certify Alaska's fisheries as responsibly managed. Fisheries management mandates and approaches built on such metrics and technologies as maximum sustainable yield and systems of tradable quotas actually serve to constrain, circumscribe, and marginalize some Alaskans' opportunities for effecting change in how the benefits of these fisheries are allocated. Beneath the narrative of sustainability, these management technologies perpetuate a cognitive ecological model of sustainability that is oriented to single-species outcomes, that casts people as parasites, and thus assumes the necessity of trade-offs between biological and social goals. Alternative cognitive models are available that draw metaphors from different ecological concepts such as keystone species and mutualisms. Such models, when used to inform management approaches, may improve societal outcomes in Alaska and elsewhere by promoting food security and sustainability through diversified natural resource harvest strategies that are more flexible and responsive to environmental variability and change.
PubMed ID
22988912 View in PubMed
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An analysis of the respiratory health status among seafarers in the Russian trawler and merchant fleets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133568
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2011 Dec;54(12):971-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Olga Shiryaeva
Lisbeth Aasmoe
Bjørn Straume
Berit Elisabeth Bang
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsoe, Tromsoe, Norway; Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital North Norway, Tromsoe, Norway. Olga.Shiryaeva@uit.no
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2011 Dec;54(12):971-9
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nitric Oxide - toxicity
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Russia - epidemiology
Ships
Abstract
Trawler fishermen and merchant seafarers have tough working conditions. While workers in both occupations are exposed to a challenging environment, trawler fishermen are also engaged in onboard fish processing, which is considered to be additional exposure. The aim of the present study was to characterize respiratory health status in both groups of seamen.
In total 127 trawler fishermen and 118 merchant seafarers were enrolled during their regular medical health examinations. The study protocol comprised a standardized questionnaire, lung function test and measurements of fractional nitric oxide concentrations (FE(NO) ) in exhaled air.
Doctor-diagnosed asthma was reported only by trawler fishermen (3.9%, P?
PubMed ID
21692095 View in PubMed
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An approach to the development of hearing standards for hearing-critical jobs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181513
Source
Noise Health. 2003 Oct-Dec;6(21):17-37
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Laroche
S. Soli
C. Giguère
J. Lagacé
V. Vaillancourt
M. Fortin
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Program, Ontario, Canada. claroche@uottawa.ca
Source
Noise Health. 2003 Oct-Dec;6(21):17-37
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Fisheries
Hearing Loss - diagnosis - etiology
Humans
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Psychometrics
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Speech Perception - classification
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
Many jobs at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) have several features in common: they are often performed in noisy environments and involve a number of auditory skills and abilities, such as speech communication, sound localization, and sound detection. If an individual lacks these skills and abilities, it may constitute a safety risk for this individual, as well as for fellow workers and the general public. A number of scientific models have been developed to predict performance on these auditory skills based on diagnostic measures of hearing such as pure-tone audiograms. While these models have significant scientific and research value, they are unable to provide accurate predictions of real life performance on auditory skills necessary to perform hearing-critical jobs. An alternative and more accurate approach has been developed in this research project. A direct measure of functional speech perception in noise (Hearing in Noise Test: HINT) has been identified and validated for use in screening applicants for hearing-critical jobs in DFO. This screening tool has adequate and well-defined psychometric properties (e.g. reliability, sensitivity, and validity) so that screening test results can be used to predict an individual's ability to perform critical auditory skills in noisy environments, with a known degree of prediction error. Important issues must be considered when setting screening criteria. First, the concept of hearing-critical tasks must be reviewed, since these tasks are often performed in high noise levels where normally-hearing people cannot hear adequately. Second, noise-induced hearing loss is frequent in these noisy environments, and workers who acquire a hearing loss might not continue to meet the minimal auditory screening criteria throughout their career. Other senses (e.g., vision, touch) also play an important role in these environments. Third, adaptation strategies have to be considered when recruits or incumbents fail the screening test.
PubMed ID
14965451 View in PubMed
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Ancient DNA reveals the Arctic origin of Viking Age cod from Haithabu, Germany.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292108
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 08 22; 114(34):9152-9157
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-22-2017
Author
Bastiaan Star
Sanne Boessenkool
Agata T Gondek
Elena A Nikulina
Anne Karin Hufthammer
Christophe Pampoulie
Halvor Knutsen
Carl André
Heidi M Nistelberger
Jan Dierking
Christoph Petereit
Dirk Heinrich
Kjetill S Jakobsen
Nils Chr Stenseth
Sissel Jentoft
James H Barrett
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo, Norway; n.c.stenseth@ibv.uio.no bastiaan.star@ibv.uio.no.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 08 22; 114(34):9152-9157
Date
08-22-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Atlantic Ocean
Bone and Bones - metabolism
DNA, Ancient - analysis - isolation & purification
Ecosystem
Fisheries - history
Fossils
Gadus morhua - genetics
Geography
Germany
History, Medieval
Norway
United Kingdom
Abstract
Knowledge of the range and chronology of historic trade and long-distance transport of natural resources is essential for determining the impacts of past human activities on marine environments. However, the specific biological sources of imported fauna are often difficult to identify, in particular if species have a wide spatial distribution and lack clear osteological or isotopic differentiation between populations. Here, we report that ancient fish-bone remains, despite being porous, brittle, and light, provide an excellent source of endogenous DNA (15-46%) of sufficient quality for whole-genome reconstruction. By comparing ancient sequence data to that of modern specimens, we determine the biological origin of 15 Viking Age (800-1066 CE) and subsequent medieval (1066-1280 CE) Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) specimens from excavation sites in Germany, Norway, and the United Kingdom. Archaeological context indicates that one of these sites was a fishing settlement for the procurement of local catches, whereas the other localities were centers of trade. Fish from the trade sites show a mixed ancestry and are statistically differentiated from local fish populations. Moreover, Viking Age samples from Haithabu, Germany, are traced back to the North East Arctic Atlantic cod population that has supported the Lofoten fisheries of Norway for centuries. Our results resolve a long-standing controversial hypothesis and indicate that the marine resources of the North Atlantic Ocean were used to sustain an international demand for protein as far back as the Viking Age.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28784790 View in PubMed
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305 records – page 1 of 31.