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Altitudinal and thermal gradients of hepatic Cyp1A gene expression in natural populations of Salmo trutta from high mountain lakes and their correlation with organohalogen loads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98080
Source
Environ Pollut. 2010 May;158(5):1392-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Sergio Jarque
Eva Gallego
Mireia Bartrons
Jordi Catalan
Joan O Grimalt
Benjamin Piña
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18, 08034-Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2010 May;158(5):1392-8
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altitude
Animals
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - genetics - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Fish Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Fresh Water - analysis
Gene Expression - drug effects
Hydrocarbons, Halogenated - analysis - toxicity
Liver - enzymology
Norway
Temperature
Trout - metabolism
Abstract
The biomarker of xenobiotic exposure cytochrome p450A1 (Cyp1A) was used to analyze the biological response to chemical pollution in Salmo trutta (brown trout) from nine high mountain European lakes in Norway, Tatras, Tyrol, and central Pyrenees. Hepatic Cyp1A mRNA levels correlated both with the reciprocal of absolute annual average air temperatures of the sampled lakes and with muscle concentrations of several hydrophobic organohalogen compounds (OC), including chlorinated polychlorobiphenyls (PCB), DDE, and DDT. The correlation between Cyp1A expression and OC content was observed across the whole temperature range (between -0.7 degrees C and +6.2 degrees C), but also in the absence of any thermal gradient. We concluded that airborne pollutants accumulate in high mountain lake fish at concentrations high enough to increase Cyp1A expression, among other possible effects. As geographical distribution of semi-volatile OC is strongly influenced by air temperatures, future climate modifications will potentially enhance their physiological effects in lake ecosystems.
PubMed ID
20149942 View in PubMed
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Complete mitochondrial genome of the white char Salvelinus albus (Salmoniformes, Salmonidae).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289352
Source
Mitochondrial DNA A DNA Mapp Seq Anal. 2016 09; 27(5):3753-4
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2016
Author
Evgeniy S Balakirev
Valery A Parensky
Mikhail Yu Kovalev
Francisco J Ayala
Author Affiliation
a Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology , University of California , Irvine , CA , United States of America .
Source
Mitochondrial DNA A DNA Mapp Seq Anal. 2016 09; 27(5):3753-4
Date
09-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Fish Proteins - genetics
Genome, Mitochondrial
Phylogeny
Salmonidae - genetics
Whole Genome Sequencing
Abstract
The complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced in two individuals of white char Salvelinus albus. The genome sequences are 16?653?bp in size, and the gene arrangement, composition, and size are very similar to the salmonid fish genomes published previously. The low level of sequence divergence detected between the genome of S. albus and the GenBank complete mitochondrial genomes of the Northern Dolly Varden char S. malma (KJ746618) and the Arctic char S. alpinus (AF154851) may likely be due to recent divergence of the species and/or historical hybridization and interspecific replacement of mtDNA.
PubMed ID
26358825 View in PubMed
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Discovery and identification of candidate sex-related genes based on transcriptome sequencing of Russian sturgeon (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii) gonads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289331
Source
Physiol Genomics. 2016 07 01; 48(7):464-76
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-01-2016
Author
Yadong Chen
Yongtao Xia
Changwei Shao
Lei Han
Xuejie Chen
Mengjun Yu
Zhenxia Sha
Author Affiliation
Key Laboratory for Sustainable Development of Marine Fisheries, Ministry of Agriculture, Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Qingdao, China; Function Laboratory for Marine Fisheries Science and Food Production Processes, Aoshanwei Town, Jimo, Qingdao, China; and.
Source
Physiol Genomics. 2016 07 01; 48(7):464-76
Date
07-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Female
Fish Proteins - genetics
Fishes - genetics - metabolism
Gonads - metabolism
Male
Russia
Sex Differentiation - genetics
Signal Transduction - genetics
Transcriptome - genetics
Abstract
As the Russian sturgeon (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii) is an important food and is the main source of caviar, it is necessary to discover the genes associated with its sex differentiation. However, the complicated life and maturity cycles of the Russian sturgeon restrict the accurate identification of sex in early development. To generate a first look at specific sex-related genes, we sequenced the transcriptome of gonads in different development stages (1, 2, and 5 yr old stages) with next-generation RNA sequencing. We generated >60 million raw reads, and the filtered reads were assembled into 263,341 contigs, which produced 38,505 unigenes. Genes involved in signal transduction mechanisms were the most abundant, suggesting that development of sturgeon gonads is under control of signal transduction mechanisms. Differentially expressed gene analysis suggests that more genes for protein synthesis, cytochrome c oxidase subunits, and ribosomal proteins were expressed in female gonads than in male. Meanwhile, male gonads expressed more transposable element transposase, reverse transcriptase, and transposase-related genes than female. In total, 342, 782, and 7,845 genes were detected in intersex, male, and female transcriptomes, respectively. The female gonad expressed more genes than the male gonad, and more genes were involved in female gonadal development. Genes (sox9, foxl2) are differentially expressed in different sexes and may be important sex-related genes in Russian sturgeon. Sox9 genes are responsible for the development of male gonads and foxl2 for female gonads.
PubMed ID
27199458 View in PubMed
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Early human use of anadromous salmon in North America at 11,500 y ago.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271723
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Oct 6;112(40):12344-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-6-2015
Author
Carrin M Halffman
Ben A Potter
Holly J McKinney
Bruce P Finney
Antonia T Rodrigues
Dongya Y Yang
Brian M Kemp
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Oct 6;112(40):12344-8
Date
Oct-6-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Base Sequence
Carbon Isotopes
Cytochromes b - classification - genetics
DNA - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - chemistry - genetics
Fish Proteins - genetics
Fossils
Geography
Haplotypes
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Nitrogen Isotopes
Oncorhynchus keta - anatomy & histology - genetics
Phylogeny
Radiometric Dating - methods
Rivers
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid
Spine - anatomy & histology - metabolism
Abstract
Salmon represented a critical resource for prehistoric foragers along the North Pacific Rim, and continue to be economically and culturally important; however, the origins of salmon exploitation remain unresolved. Here we report 11,500-y-old salmon associated with a cooking hearth and human burials from the Upward Sun River Site, near the modern extreme edge of salmon habitat in central Alaska. This represents the earliest known human use of salmon in North America. Ancient DNA analyses establish the species as Oncorhynchus keta (chum salmon), and stable isotope analyses indicate anadromy, suggesting that salmon runs were established by at least the terminal Pleistocene. The early use of this resource has important implications for Paleoindian land use, economy, and expansions into northwest North America.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26392548 View in PubMed
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Endocrine disruption and differential gene expression in sentinel fish on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska: Health implications for indigenous residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293036
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Mar; 234:279-287
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Frank A von Hippel
Pamela K Miller
David O Carpenter
Danielle Dillon
Lauren Smayda
Ioanna Katsiadaki
Tom A Titus
Peter Batzel
John H Postlethwait
C Loren Buck
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences & Center for Bioengineering Innovation, Northern Arizona University, 617 S. Beaver St., PO Box 5640, Flagstaff, AZ 86011, USA. Electronic address: frank.vonhippel@nau.edu.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Mar; 234:279-287
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Arctic Regions
Endocrine Disruptors - analysis - metabolism - pharmacology
Environmental Restoration and Remediation
Female
Fish Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Food contamination - analysis
Food Safety
Fresh Water - analysis
Humans
Islands
Male
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Seafood - analysis
Smegmamorpha - genetics - growth & development - metabolism
Vitellogenins - genetics - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism - pharmacology
Abstract
People living a subsistence lifestyle in the Arctic are highly exposed to persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Formerly Used Defense (FUD) sites are point sources of PCB pollution; the Arctic contains thousands of FUD sites, many co-located with indigenous villages. We investigated PCB profiles and biological effects in freshwater fish (Alaska blackfish [Dallia pectoralis] and ninespine stickleback [Pungitius pungitius]) living upstream and downstream of the Northeast Cape FUD site on St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea. Despite extensive site remediation, fish remained contaminated with PCBs. Vitellogenin concentrations in males indicated exposure to estrogenic contaminants, and some fish were hypothyroid. Downstream fish showed altered DNA methylation in gonads and altered gene expression related to DNA replication, response to DNA damage, and cell signaling. This study demonstrates that, even after site remediation, contaminants from Cold War FUD sites in remote regions of the Arctic remain a potential health threat to local residents - in this case, Yupik people who had no influence over site selection and use by the United States military.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29182972 View in PubMed
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Environmental, population and life-stage plasticity in the visual system of Atlantic cod.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297758
Source
J Exp Biol. 2018 01 11; 221(Pt 1):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-11-2018
Author
Ragnhild Valen
Rita Karlsen
Jon Vidar Helvik
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Bergen, NO-5020 Bergen, Norway ragnhild.valen@uib.no vidar.helvik@uib.no.
Source
J Exp Biol. 2018 01 11; 221(Pt 1):
Date
01-11-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animal Migration
Animals
Atlantic Ocean
Female
Fish Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Gadus morhua - genetics - growth & development - physiology
Gene Expression Regulation
Male
Norway
Opsins - genetics - metabolism
Seasons
Vision, Ocular
Abstract
The visual system is for many fishes essential in guiding behaviors, such as foraging, predator avoidance and mate choice. The marine environment is characterized by large spatio-temporal fluctuations in light intensity and spectral composition. However, visual capabilities are restricted by both space limitations set by eye size and by the genomic content of light-absorbing opsin genes. The rich array of visual opsins in teleosts may be used differentially to tune vision towards specific needs during ontogeny and to changing light. Yet, to what extent visual plasticity is a pre-programmed developmental event, or is triggered by photic environment, is unclear. Our previous studies on Atlantic cod revealed an evolutionary genomic loss of UV-sensitive sws1 and red-sensitive lws opsin families, while blue-sensitive sws2 and green-sensitive rh2 opsins had duplicated. The current study has taken an opsin expression approach to characterize visual plasticity in cod towards different spectral light during the larval stage, to maturation and extreme seasonal changes in the Barents Sea. Our data suggest that opsin plasticity in cod larvae is controlled by developmental programme rather than immediate light environment. The lack of expressional changes during maturation suggests a less important role for visual modulation related to mate choice. Although no seasonal effects on visual opsins were detected in migratory Northeast Arctic cod, the expressed opsin subset differed from the more stationary Norwegian coastal cod described in previous studies. Interestingly, these data provide the first indications of a population difference in actively used visual opsins associated with cod ecotypes.
PubMed ID
29146770 View in PubMed
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Evidence of disruption in estrogen-associated signaling in the liver transcriptome of in-migrating sockeye salmon of British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119423
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol. 2013 Mar;157(2):150-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Nik Veldhoen
Michael G Ikonomou
Vicki Rehaume
Cory Dubetz
David A Patterson
Caren C Helbing
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry & Microbiology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 Stn CSC, Victoria, B.C., Canada V8W 3P6.
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol. 2013 Mar;157(2):150-61
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Migration
Animals
British Columbia
Estrogens - metabolism
Female
Fish Proteins - genetics
Geography
Humans
Liver - drug effects - metabolism
Male
Reproduction - drug effects - genetics - physiology
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Rivers
Salmon - genetics - physiology
Sex Factors
Signal Transduction - genetics
Time Factors
Transcriptome - drug effects - genetics
Water Pollutants - toxicity
Abstract
The health of sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka) salmon stocks is of increasing concern; reflecting both a sentinel of human-impacted aquatic environments and as a key fishery for British Columbia, Canada. The spawning migration of Pacific sockeye salmon represents a critical life stage where significant demands are made on animal biology and important BC fisheries are linked to this migration in the Skeena and Fraser River watersheds. These watersheds present very different environments; the former being sparsely populated with little industrial impact, while the latter flows through highly-populated areas. The present study used quantitative real-time PCR analysis of adult sockeye salmon from four 2008 stocks [Fulton River and Pinkut Creek (Skeena) and Weaver Creek and Harrison River (Fraser)] to evaluate ten hepatic gene transcripts associated with reproduction, stress, energy metabolism, and exposure to environmental contaminants. Dynamic changes in mRNA abundance were observed in Fulton River stock animals from the Skeena River mouth to the spawning ground which reflect the physiological demands of in-river migration and reproductive maturation. Inter-stock comparisons of migrants at spawning grounds demonstrated a marked difference in the sex-specific gene hepatic gene expression profiles. Our original hypothesis was that a greater diversity in mRNA profiles is associated with watersheds with higher human impact. However, our observations contradict this posit. Skeena males and females displayed poor definition in their molecular profiles between sexes while the Fraser River fish had very distinctive sex differences that were consistent with the previous year's migration. The genetic sex distribution and ratio of milt versus roe production did not differ between the Skeena and Fraser River spawning site fish. However, a significant percentage of Skeena animals displayed marked discordance of these characteristics with gender-specific hepatic mRNA profiles implying that an alteration in estrogen-mediated signaling has occurred. Continued geospatial and longitudinal assessments will help determine to what extent the dynamic molecular biology of late life-stage sockeye salmon reflects natural variation or modulation by anthropogenic causative agents.
PubMed ID
23103762 View in PubMed
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Gene regulation of lipid and phospholipid metabolism in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274689
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol B Biochem Mol Biol. 2015 Dec;190:16-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Keshuai Li
Mari-Ann Østensen
Kari Attramadal
Per Winge
Torfinn Sparstad
Atle M Bones
Olav Vadstein
Elin Kjørsvik
Yngvar Olsen
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol B Biochem Mol Biol. 2015 Dec;190:16-26
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetyltransferases - genetics - metabolism
Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Animals
Aquaculture
Fatty Acid Desaturases - genetics - metabolism
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis - metabolism
Fish Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Gadus morhua - growth & development - physiology
Gene Expression Profiling - veterinary
Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Isoenzymes - genetics - metabolism
Larva - enzymology - growth & development - metabolism
Lipid Metabolism
Norway
Nutritional Requirements
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis - veterinary
Phospholipids - chemistry - metabolism
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The mechanism of essentiality of dietary phospholipid (PL) for larval fish is not clear. The main objective of the present study was to determine if the PL requirement of Atlantic cod larvae was due to any genetic impairment caused by functional immaturity. Cod larvae were sampled at 1, 3, 8, 13, 17, 18, 30, 42 and 60 days post hatch (dph) for transcriptome analysis using a recently developed microarray. The fatty acid profile and gene expression levels of cod larvae at 17 dph were compared after feeding differently enriched rotifers, which contained different DHA levels in PL. No significant differences (p
PubMed ID
26310360 View in PubMed
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[Genetic diversity of charrs of the Commander Islands based on the analysis of mitochondrial DNA].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289673
Source
Genetika. 2016 Nov; 52(11):1336-41
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
V A Soshina
S D Pavlov
D A Zelenina
Source
Genetika. 2016 Nov; 52(11):1336-41
Date
Nov-2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Cytochromes b - genetics
Fish Proteins - genetics
Genetic Variation
Salmonidae - genetics
Siberia
Abstract
Nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b (CytB) gene fragment and the control region (D-loop) of Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma) from the Commander Islands and the Kol River of the Kamchatka Peninsula were examined. A high level of genetic variability of island populations comparable to that of the mainland population of western Kamchatka was demonstrated. The belonging of the Commander Islands chars to the genetic lineage of northern Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma malma was confirmed.
PubMed ID
29372798 View in PubMed
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[Genetic diversity of charrs of the Commander Islands based on the analysis of mitochondrial DNA].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289515
Source
Genetika. 2016 Nov; 52(11):1336-41
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
V A Soshina
S D Pavlov
D A Zelenina
Source
Genetika. 2016 Nov; 52(11):1336-41
Date
Nov-2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Cytochromes b - genetics
Fish Proteins - genetics
Genetic Variation
Salmonidae - genetics
Siberia
Abstract
Nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b (CytB) gene fragment and the control region (D-loop) of Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma) from the Commander Islands and the Kol River of the Kamchatka Peninsula were examined. A high level of genetic variability of island populations comparable to that of the mainland population of western Kamchatka was demonstrated. The belonging of the Commander Islands chars to the genetic lineage of northern Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma malma was confirmed.
PubMed ID
29372798 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.