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Assessment of microbiological quality of retail fresh sushi from selected sources in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269395
Source
J Food Prot. 2015 May;78(5):977-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Sunniva Hoel
Lisbeth Mehli
Torkjel Bruheim
Olav Vadstein
Anita Nordeng Jakobsen
Source
J Food Prot. 2015 May;78(5):977-82
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial
Enterobacteriaceae - isolation & purification
Fish Products - microbiology
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Food contamination - analysis
Food Handling
Food Microbiology
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Norway
Abstract
Retail fresh sushi is gaining popularity in Europe. This study was conducted to investigate the microbiological quality of selected samples of fresh sushi with a shelf life of 2 to 3 days offered as complete meals in Norwegian supermarkets. Analysis of aerobic plate counts in 58 sushi samples from three producers revealed large variations in microbiological quality, and 48% of the analyzed sushi boxes were rated as unsatisfactory (> 6.0 log CFU/g). Mesophilic Aeromonas spp. was detected in 71% of the samples. In a follow-up study, we collected products and raw materials directly from the production facility of one producer and observed a significant decrease (P
PubMed ID
25951393 View in PubMed
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Contamination of salmon fillets and processing plants with spoilage bacteria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281160
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2016 Nov 21;237:98-108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-21-2016
Author
Trond Møretrø
Birgitte Moen
Even Heir
Anlaug Å Hansen
Solveig Langsrud
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2016 Nov 21;237:98-108
Date
Nov-21-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Load
Fish Products - microbiology
Food Contamination
Food Handling
Food Industry
Food Microbiology
Food Preservation
Norway
Photobacterium - isolation & purification
Phylogeny
Pseudomonas - isolation & purification
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Salmon - microbiology
Seawater
Shewanella - isolation & purification
Abstract
The processing environment of salmon processing plants represents a potential major source of bacteria causing spoilage of fresh salmon. In this study, we have identified major contamination routes of important spoilage associated species within the genera Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Photobacterium in pre-rigor processing of salmon. Bacterial counts and culture-independent 16S rRNA gene analysis on salmon fillet from seven processing plants showed higher levels of Pseudomonas spp. and Shewanella spp. in industrially processed fillets compared to salmon processed under strict hygienic conditions. Higher levels of Pseudomonas spp. and Shewanella spp. were found on fillets produced early on the production day compared to later processed fillets. The levels of Photobacterium spp. were not dependent on the processing method or time of processing. In follow-up studies of two plants, bacterial isolates (n=2101) from the in-plant processing environments (sanitized equipment/machines and seawater) and from salmon collected at different sites in the production were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Pseudomonas spp. dominated in equipment/machines after sanitation with 72 and 91% of samples from the two plants being Pseudomonas-positive. The phylogenetic analyses, based on partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing, showed 48 unique sequence profiles of Pseudomonas of which two were dominant. Only six profiles were found on both machines and in fillets in both plants. Shewanella spp. were found on machines after sanitation in the slaughter department while Photobacterium spp. were not detected after sanitation in any parts of the plants. Shewanella spp. and Photobacterium spp. were found on salmon in the slaughter departments. Shewanella was frequently present in seawater tanks used for bleeding/short term storage. In conclusion, this study provides new knowledge on the processing environment as a source of contamination of salmon fillets with Pseudomonas spp. and Shewanella spp., while Photobacterium spp. most likely originate from the live fish and seawater. The study show that strict hygiene during processing is a prerequisite for optimal shelf life of salmon fillets and that about 90% reductions in the initial levels of bacteria on salmon fillets can be obtained using optimal hygienic conditions.
PubMed ID
27552347 View in PubMed
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Control options for Listeria monocytogenes in seafoods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196105
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2000 Dec 20;62(3):267-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-2000
Author
H H Huss
L V Jørgensen
B F Vogel
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Fisheries Research, Department of Seafood Research, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby. fish@ffl.min.dk
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2000 Dec 20;62(3):267-74
Date
Dec-20-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Fish Products - microbiology - standards
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Food Preservation
Food-Processing Industry - standards
Hot Temperature
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Listeriosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Quality Control
Seafood - microbiology
Time Factors
Abstract
At least three outbreaks of listeriosis associated with seafood have been reported. Listeria monocytogenes is widely distributed in the general environment including fresh water, coastal water and live fish from these areas. Contamination or recontamination of seafood may also take place during processing and low levels (
PubMed ID
11156271 View in PubMed
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Development of a real-time PCR method coupled with a selective pre-enrichment step for quantification of Morganella morganii and Morganella psychrotolerans in fish products.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267922
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2015 Jun 16;203:55-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-16-2015
Author
Gaëtan Podeur
Paw Dalgaard
Francoise Leroi
Hervé Prévost
Jette Emborg
Jan Martinussen
Lars Hestbjerg Hansen
Marie-France Pilet
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2015 Jun 16;203:55-62
Date
Jun-16-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Culture Techniques
DNA Primers - genetics
Denmark
Fish Products - microbiology
Fishes - microbiology
Food Microbiology - methods
Foodborne Diseases - prevention & control
Histamine - metabolism
Morganella - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Morganella morganii - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Seafood - microbiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Histamine fish poisoning is common and due to toxic concentrations of histamine often produced by Gram-negative bacteria in fin-fish products with a high content of the free amino acid histidine. The genus Morganella includes two species previously reported to cause incidents of histamine fish poisoning. Morganella morganii and Morganella psychrotolerans are both strong producer of histamine. However, little is known about the occurrence and critical stages for fish contamination with these bacteria. To elucidate contamination routes of Morganella, specific real-time quantitative PCR (RTi qPCR) methods for quantification of M. morganii and M. psychrotolerans have been developed. Selective primers amplified a 110 bp region of the vasD gene for M. psychrotolerans and a 171 bp region of the galactokinase gene for M. morganii. These primer-sets showed high specificity as demonstrated by using purified DNA from 23 other histamine producing bacteria and 26 isolates with no or limited histamine production. The efficiency of the qPCR reactions on artificially contaminated fish samples were 100.8% and 96.3% respectively. The limit of quantification (LOQ) without enrichment was 4 log CFU/g. A quantitative enrichment step with a selective medium was included and improved the sensitivity of the methods to a LOQ of below 50 CFU/g in seafood. RTi qPCR methods with or without enrichment were evaluated for enumeration of Morganella species in naturally contaminated fresh fish and lightly preserved seafood from Denmark. These new methods will contribute to a better understanding of the occurrence and histamine production by Morganella species in fish products, information that is essential to reduce the unacceptably high frequency of histamine fish poisoning.
PubMed ID
25791250 View in PubMed
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[Hygienic assessment of the intake of fish products and their quality].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163338
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Mar-Apr;(2):39-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu P Shul'gin
LazhentsevaqL Iu
L V Shul'gina
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Mar-Apr;(2):39-42
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Energy intake
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Feeding Behavior
Fish Products - microbiology - standards
Fishes
Humans
Nutritional Status
Public Health
Russia
Abstract
The impact of provision of the population with fish products and the level of their intake on public health was studied. Analysis of statistical data and the results of the authors' own data has provided strong evidence that the reduction in the volume of catch of water biological resources, the production, and intake of their foodstuffs, as well as the low actual quality of fish products on the consumer market significantly deteriorate the indices of the population's health state.
PubMed ID
17526226 View in PubMed
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Incidence and control of Listeria monocytogenes in foods in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51662
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1999 Dec 15;53(2-3):195-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1999
Author
B. Nørrung
J K Andersen
J. Schlundt
Author Affiliation
Division of Microbiological Safety, Institute of Food Safety and Toxicology, Danish Veterinary and Food Admnistration, Søborg. bin@vfd.dk
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1999 Dec 15;53(2-3):195-203
Date
Dec-15-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Denmark - epidemiology
Fish Products - microbiology - standards
Food Microbiology
Food Packaging
Food-Processing Industry
Incidence
Listeria Infections - epidemiology
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Meat Products - microbiology - standards
Public Policy
Vegetables - microbiology - standards
Abstract
The Danish regulatory policy on Listeria monocytogenes in foods is based on the principles of HACCP and was developed using a health risk assessment approach. The Danish policy focuses examinations and criteria for L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat foods and is based on a combination of inspection and product-testing. Based on current epidemiological information from several countries, a concentration of L. monocytogenes not exceeding 100 cfu/g of food at the time of consumption, seems to be of low risk to the consumers. In Denmark, ready-to-eat foods have been placed into six categories where absence of L. monocytogenes in 25 g is required in foods heat treated in the final package and in heat-treated as well as preserved, non heat-treated foods which can support growth within the shelf life. This level is necessary in foods capable of supporting growth, in order not to exceed 100 L. monocytogenes per g at the point of consumption. In heat-treated and preserved foods, which are not supportive of growth within the shelf-life and for raw, ready to eat foods, a level below 10 L. monocytogenes per g is regarded acceptable. A level between 10 and 100 L. monocytogenes per g is not satisfactory and a level above 100/g is not acceptable. Data on the qualitative and quantitative occurrence of L. monocytogenes in foods in Denmark are presented and discussed. In 1997 and 1998, greater than 15,000 samples from different categories of food were examined (semi-quantitatively) for the presence of L. monocytogenes. A significant difference could be seen in the number of samples containing more than 100 L. monocytogenes per g, between different categories of foods (1997, P = 0.001; 1998, P = 0.016). In 1997, preserved meat products and preserved fish products and to a lesser extent vegetables and meat or vegetable mayonnaise were more likely to contain high numbers (i.e. above 100 cfu/g) of L. monocytogenes than other food categories. In 1998, preserved meat products, but also heat-treated meat products, vegetables and meat or vegetable mayonnaise had the highest frequency of samples with > 100 L. monocytogenes per g. In a survey performed in 1994 and 1995, 1.3% of ready-to-eat food samples (heat-treated meat products, preserved meat and fish products) were found to be contaminated with L. monocytogenes at a level above 100 cfu/g. The samples included in this survey were primarily products produced by authorized companies and were comprised mainly of vacuum packed products or products packed in modified atmosphere and with long shelf lives, typically above several weeks. The corresponding percentages of positive samples primarily processed in the retail outlets (heat-treated meat products, preserved meat and fish products) in 1997 and 1998 were 0.3% and 0.6%, respectively. The results suggest that ready-to-eat meat and fish products with extended shelf-lives produced by authorized companies are more likely to contain high numbers (> 100 cfu/g) of L. monocytogenes than products processed in the retail sector which often have a shorter shelf life.
PubMed ID
10634710 View in PubMed
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Microbiological assessment along the fish production chain of the Norwegian pelagic fisheries sector--Results from a spot sampling programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272960
Source
Food Microbiol. 2015 Oct;51:144-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Cecilie Smith Svanevik
Irja Sunde Roiha
Arne Levsen
Bjørn Tore Lunestad
Source
Food Microbiol. 2015 Oct;51:144-53
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacteria - classification - isolation & purification
Colony Count, Microbial
Fish Products - microbiology
Fisheries - standards - statistics & numerical data
Fishes - microbiology
Food Quality
Food Safety
Hygiene - standards
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Norway
Sampling Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
Microbes play an important role in the degradation of fish products, thus better knowledge of the microbiological conditions throughout the fish production chain may help to optimise product quality and resource utilisation. This paper presents the results of a ten-year spot sampling programme (2005-2014) of the commercially most important pelagic fish species harvested in Norway. Fish-, surface-, and storage water samples were collected from fishing vessels and processing factories. Totally 1,181 samples were assessed with respect to microbiological quality, hygiene and food safety. We introduce a quality and safety assessment scheme for fresh pelagic fish recommending limits for heterotrophic plate counts (HPC), thermos tolerant coliforms, enterococci and Listeria monocytogenes. According to the scheme, in 25 of 41 samplings, sub-optimal conditions were found with respect to quality, whereas in 21 and 9 samplings, samples were not in compliance concerning hygiene and food safety, respectively. The present study has revealed that the quality of pelagic fish can be optimised by improving the hygiene conditions at some critical points at an early phase of the production chain. Thus, the proposed assessment scheme may provide a useful tool for the industry to optimise quality and maintain consumer safety of pelagic fishery products.
PubMed ID
26187839 View in PubMed
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Occurrence and distribution of listeria species in facilities producing ready-to-eat foods in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127483
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 Feb;75(2):216-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Jovana Kovacevic
Lorraine F McIntyre
Sarah B Henderson
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
Food, Nutrition and Health Program, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, 2205 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4. jovanak@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 Feb;75(2):216-24
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
British Columbia - epidemiology
Colony Count, Microbial
Dairy Products - microbiology
Fast Foods - microbiology
Fish Products - microbiology
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Food-Processing Industry - standards
Humans
Listeria - isolation & purification
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Meat Products - microbiology
Prevalence
Abstract
In British Columbia (BC), Canada, food processing facilities licensed under provincial authority are not required to sample for Listeria monocytogenes in food products or processing environments. In 2009, we conducted a survey of dairy, fish, and meat facilities under BC authority to estimate the prevalence of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods and production environments. From August to October, 250 RTE food samples and 258 swabs from the food processing environments of 43 facilities were collected. Standard culture methods were applied to both food samples and swabs. Of swabs collected from all 258 environmental surfaces, 15% were positive for Listeria spp. Significantly (P, 0.001) more fish facilities than dairy and meat facilities had food contact surfaces contaminated with Listeria spp. L. monocytogenes was found in RTE foods from fish facilities alone (5 of 12); in all five of the fish facilities with contaminated product, one or more environmental swabs were also positive for L. monocytogenes. The results suggest that while control of L. monocytogenes in BC-inspected dairy and meat facilities is effective in limiting food contamination, there is a need for provincial inspectors to initiate improved monitoring and management of contamination by L. monocytogenes in RTE fish processing facilities.
PubMed ID
22289580 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.