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Dietary fish and the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) content of human milk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196736
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 2000;478:403-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
L. Lauritizen
M H Jørgensen
K F Michaelsen
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition and LMC Centre for Advanced Food Studies, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 2000;478:403-4
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Docosahexaenoic Acids - analysis
Female
Fish Oils - administration & dosage - metabolism
Fishes
Humans
Milk, human - chemistry
Time Factors
PubMed ID
11065103 View in PubMed
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Maternal fish oil supplementation in lactation: effect on developmental outcome in breast-fed infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29451
Source
Reprod Nutr Dev. 2005 Sep-Oct;45(5):535-47
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lotte Lauritzen
Marianne H Jørgensen
Sjúrdur F Olsen
Ellen Marie Straarup
Kim F Michaelsen
Author Affiliation
Center for Advanced Food Studies, Department of Human Nutrition, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Rolighedsvej 30, 1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. ll@kvl.dk
Source
Reprod Nutr Dev. 2005 Sep-Oct;45(5):535-47
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arachidonic Acid - analysis - metabolism - physiology
Breast Feeding
Child Development - drug effects - physiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Dietary Supplements
Docosahexaenoic Acids - analysis - metabolism
Double-Blind Method
Erythrocytes - chemistry
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - analysis - physiology
Female
Fish Oils - administration & dosage - metabolism - pharmacology
Humans
Infant
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Infant, Newborn
Lactation - drug effects - physiology
Language Development
Male
Milk, human - chemistry
Pregnancy
Problem Solving - drug effects - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Visual Acuity - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) accumulates in the brain during the 1st and 2nd years of life. The objective of this study was to see if an increased content of DHA in breast-milk via maternal fish oil (FO)-supplementation affects mental development in term infants. one hundred twenty-two Danish mothers with a habitual fish intake below the population median were randomized to 4.5 g.d(-1) of FO or olive oil (OO) for the first four months of lactation. Fifty-three mothers with habitual fish intake in the highest quartile were included as reference group. The effect of the resulting increase in infant DHA-intake and RBC-DHA level was assessed on problem solving ability at nine months and language at one and two years of age. Infants in the three groups performed equally well on the problem test and no association was observed between problem solving and erythrocyte-DHA at four months. Passive vocabulary at one year was lower in the children of the FO- compared with the OO-group (P
PubMed ID
16188206 View in PubMed
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Randomized trial of weight-loss-diets for young adults varying in fish and fish oil content.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87187
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2007 Oct;31(10):1560-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Thorsdottir I.
Tomasson H.
Gunnarsdottir I.
Gisladottir E.
Kiely M.
Parra M D
Bandarra N M
Schaafsma G.
Martinéz J A
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Landspitali University Hospital, University of Iceland, Eiriksgata-29, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland. ingathor@landspitali.is
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2007 Oct;31(10):1560-6
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Diet, Fat-Restricted
Female
Fish Oils - administration & dosage - metabolism
Fish Products
Fishes
Humans
Male
Obesity - diet therapy
Plant Oils - administration & dosage - metabolism
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of including seafood and fish oils, as part of an energy-restricted diet, on weight loss in young overweight adults. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial of energy-restricted diet varying in fish and fish oil content was followed for 8 weeks. Subjects were randomized to one of four groups: (1) control (sunflower oil capsules, no seafood); (2) lean fish (3 x 150 g portions of cod/week); (3) fatty fish (3 x 150 g portions of salmon/week); (4) fish oil (DHA/EPA capsules, no seafood). The macronutrient composition of the diets was similar between the groups and the capsule groups, were single-blinded. SUBJECTS: A total of 324 men and women aged 20-40 years, BMI 27.5-32.5 kg/m(2) from Iceland, Spain and Ireland. MEASUREMENTS: Anthropometric data were collected at baseline, midpoint and endpoint. Confounding factors were accounted for, with linear models, for repeated measures with two-way interactions. The most important interactions for weight loss were (diet x energy intake), (gender x diet) and (gender x initial-weight). RESULTS: An average man in the study (95 kg at baseline receiving 1600 kcal/day) was estimated to lose 3.55 kg (95% CI, 3.14-3.97) (1); 4.35 kg (95% CI, 3.94-4.75) (2); 4.50 kg (95% CI, 4.13-4.87) (3) and 4.96 kg (95% CI, 4.53-5.40) on diet (4) in 4 weeks, from baseline to midpoint. The weight-loss from midpoint to endpoint was 0.45 (0.41-0.49) times the observed weight loss from baseline to midpoint. The diets did not differ in their effect on weight loss in women. Changes in measures of body composition were in line with changes in body weight. CONCLUSION: In young, overweight men, the inclusion of either lean or fatty fish, or fish oil as part of an energy-restricted diet resulted in approximately 1 kg more weight loss after 4 weeks, than did a similar diet without seafood or supplement of marine origin. The addition of seafood to a nutritionally balanced energy-restricted diet may boost weight loss.
PubMed ID
17502874 View in PubMed
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