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The 6 kHz acoustic dip in school-aged children in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216259
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
J. Haapaniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University Central Hospital of Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold
Birth weight
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, High-Frequency - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Measles - epidemiology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In the present study, pure-tone audiometry was used in 687 Finnish school children, aged 6-15 years, to determine the prevalence of a 6 kHz acoustic dip and related factors among three age groups. Trained audiometricians tested air conduction thresholds in a sound-proof room. A total of 57 children (8.3%) had a clear-cut dip of at least 20 dB at 6 kHz. This dip was more pronounced in older children and in boys. A thorough case history was obtained by questionnaire, with logistic regression analysis showing that low birth weight (
PubMed ID
8562032 View in PubMed
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A 26-year follow-up study of heavy drinking trajectories from adolescence to mid-adulthood and adult disadvantage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115198
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2013 Jul-Aug;48(4):452-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Noora Berg
Olli Kiviruusu
Sakari Karvonen
Laura Kestilä
Tomi Lintonen
Ossi Rahkonen
Taina Huurre
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 30, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland. noora.berg@thl.fi
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2013 Jul-Aug;48(4):452-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Male
Sex Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Unemployment
Abstract
The aim of the study was to identify heavy drinking trajectories from age 16 to 42 years and to examine their associations with health, social, employment and economic disadvantage in mid-adulthood.
Finnish cohort study's participants who were 16 years old in 1983 were followed up at age 22, 32 and 42 (n = 1334). Heavy drinking was assessed at every study phase and based on these measurements trajectories of heavy drinking were identified. The trajectory groups were then examined as predictors of disadvantage at age 42.
Five distinct heavy drinking trajectories were identified: moderate (35%), steady low (22%), decreasing (9%), increasing (11%) and steady high (23%). Frequencies of the trajectory groups differed by gender. Using the moderate trajectory as a reference category, women in the steady high trajectory had an increased risk of experiencing almost all disadvantages at age 42. In men, increasing and steady high groups had an increased risk for experiencing health and economic disadvantage.
Steady high female drinkers and steady high and increasing male drinkers had the highest risk for disadvantage in mid-adulthood. By identifying heavy drinking trajectories from adolescence to mid-adulthood we can better predict long-term consequences of heavy alcohol use and plan prevention and intervention programmes.
PubMed ID
23531717 View in PubMed
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A 35-year follow-up study on burnout among Finnish employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133208
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2011 Jul;16(3):345-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Jari J Hakanen
Arnold B Bakker
Markku Jokisaari
Author Affiliation
Centre of Excellence for Work Organizations, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. jari.hakanen@ttl.fi
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2011 Jul;16(3):345-60
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aptitude
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
This three-wave 35-year prospective study used the Job Demands-Resources model and life course epidemiology to examine how life conditions in adolescence (1961-1963) through achieved educational level and working conditions in early adulthood (1985) may be indirectly related to job burnout 35 years later (1998). We used data (N = 511) from the Finnish Healthy Child study (1961-1963) to investigate the hypothesized relationships by employing structural equation modeling analyses. The results supported the hypothesized model in which both socioeconomic status and cognitive ability in adolescence (1961-1963) were positively associated with educational level (measured in 1985), which in turn was related to working conditions in early adulthood (1985). Furthermore, working conditions (1985) were associated with job burnout (1998) 13 years later. Moreover, adult education (1985) and skill variety (1985) mediated the associations between original socioeconomic status and cognitive ability, and burnout over a 35-year time period. The results suggest that socioeconomic, individual, and work-related resources may accumulate over the life course and may protect employees from job burnout.
PubMed ID
21728440 View in PubMed
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Adolescent part-time work and heavy drinking in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190513
Source
Addiction. 2002 Mar;97(3):311-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Anne Kouvonen
Tomi Lintonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Helsinki, Finland. anne.kouvonen@om.fi
Source
Addiction. 2002 Mar;97(3):311-8
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To examine the relationship between part-time work and heavy drinking among Finnish adolescents.
The cross-sectional survey data (the School Health Promotion Survey, n = 47,568) were collected in classrooms in 2000.
Finnish lower-level secondary school students from the 8th and 9th grades, aged 14-16 years. The response rate was 82%.
Work intensity, work type and the frequency of heavy drinking obtained from self-administered questionnaires. The relationship between work and heavy drinking was studied using polychotomous logistic regression models.
Compared with non-workers, adolescents working more than 10 hours per week had an increased risk of heavy drinking, and also the frequency of heavy drinking was connected with this intensive working. When gender, grade level, parental education, the employment status of the parents, family structure, economic situation of the family, the degree of urbanisation, parental control, steady dating. GPA and disposable allowance were adjusted for, the odds of weekly drunkenness were almost three times the odds of not reporting drunkenness among intensive workers compared with non-workers. When adjusted for other factors, some typical children's jobs marginally decreased a likelihood of heavy drinking.
Work does seem not protect adolescents from heavy drinking. Although many relevant factors were controlled for the effect may, however, be mediated through factors not covered in the survey. Therefore, further clarification of the causal chains linking adolescent working and drinking is needed.
PubMed ID
11964107 View in PubMed
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Adolescent risk factors for poisonings - a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133591
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 Dec;100(12):1596-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Juho E Kivistö
Arja Rimpelä
Ville M Mattila
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. juho.kivisto@uta.fi
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 Dec;100(12):1596-602
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Health status
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Poisoning - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - psychology
Abstract
This study assessed whether adolescents' socioeconomic background, health and health behaviours are associated with later risk of poisoning hospitalization.
A prospective cohort of 54,169 Finns aged 14-18 years was followed for an average of 10.6 years. The end-point of the study was poisoning hospitalization, death or termination of follow-up in 2001. The relationships of socioeconomic background, health and health behaviour characteristics with poisoning hospitalization were studied with adjusted Cox's proportional hazard model.
We identified 443 persons (0.8%) with a diagnosed poisoning leading to hospital admission. The mean age at the time of the poisoning hospitalization was 22.7 years. The strongest risk factors for poisoning hospitalization in males were more than three stress symptoms weekly (HR 1.9), poor school success (HR 1.9) and not living with both of the parents in adolescence (HR 1.8). In females, the strongest risk factors were more than three stress symptoms weekly (HR 2.1), poor school success (HR 2.2) and recurring drunkenness as drinking style (HR 1.7).
Poor school performance, health and health-compromising behaviour adopted in adolescence are associated with a poisoning hospitalization risk in adulthood. Daily smoking and recurring drunkenness were strongly associated with a later poisoning hospitalization.
PubMed ID
21689151 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' health and health behaviour as predictors of injury death. A prospective cohort follow-up of 652,530 person-years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158113
Source
BMC Public Health. 2008;8:90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Ville M Mattila
Jari Parkkari
Leena Koivusilta
Tapio Nummi
Pekka Kannus
Arja Rimpelä
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Tampere, 33014 Tampere, Finland. ville.mattila@uta.fi
Source
BMC Public Health. 2008;8:90
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Injuries represent an important cause of mortality among young adults. Longitudinal studies on risk factors are scarce. We studied associations between adolescents' perceived health and health behaviour and injury death.
A prospective cohort of 57,407 Finns aged 14 to 18 years was followed for an average of 11.4 years. The end-point of study was injury death or termination of follow-up in 2001. The relationships of eight health and health behaviour characteristics with injury death were studied with adjusted Cox's proportional hazard model.
We identified 298 (0.5%) injury deaths, 232 (0.9%) in men and 66 (0.2%) in women. The mean age at death was 23.8 years. In the models adjusted for age, sex and socioeconomic background, the strongest risk factors for injury death were recurring drunkenness (HR 2.1; 95% CI: 1.4-3.1) and daily smoking (HR 1.7; 95% CI: 1.3-2.2). Poor health did not predict injury death. Unintentional and intentional injury deaths had similar health and health behavioural risk factors.
Health compromising behaviour adopted at adolescence has a clear impact on the risk of injury death in adulthood independent from socioeconomic background. On the other hand, poor health as such is not a significant predictor of injury death. Promotion of healthy lifestyle among adolescents as part of public health programmes would seem an appropriate way to contribute to adolescent injury prevention.
Notes
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Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 1999 Jul;60(4):480-9010463804
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Cites: Accid Anal Prev. 2005 Mar;37(2):245-5115667810
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PubMed ID
18366651 View in PubMed
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Adult smoking as a proxy for environmental tobacco smoke exposure among children - comparing the impact of the level of information in Estonia, Finland and Latvia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150353
Source
Prev Med. 2009 Aug-Sep;49(2-3):240-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kristiina Patja
Samu Hakala
Ritva Prättälä
Kirstel Ojala
Elena Boldo
Mattias Oberg
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland. Kristiina.patja@promedico.fi
Source
Prev Med. 2009 Aug-Sep;49(2-3):240-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Latvia - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Parents - psychology
Prevalence
Proxy - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
International comparability of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure levels is difficult. This study assesses whether estimating children's exposure from information on adult smoking and exposure to ETS makes international comparisons more reliable.
The exposure among children was estimated using three different combinations (models) based on different sets of information on adult smoking, household composition or adult exposure to ETS at home in three cross-sectional nationally representative samples drawn from data sets from Estonia (n=2650), Finland (n=2829) and Latvia (n=5440) in the years 2002 and 2004. The first two models were based on adult smoking and the third also included ETS exposure.
The parental smoking rate was similar to the general smoking prevalence. ETS exposure in non-smoking parents ranged from 22% in Finland to 60% in Latvia. All models gave rather comparative ranges except in Latvia, where the proportion of children with exposure varied from 67% with the simplest model to 81% with the most complex one.
Adult exposure at home or adult smoking prevalence, preferably among people with children, could be used as a proxy for children's exposure to ETS. It is recommended that population questionnaires include detailed information on exposure and household composition.
PubMed ID
19520109 View in PubMed
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Agreement between self-reported and pharmacy data on medication use in the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145028
Source
Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2010 Jun;19(2):88-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Marianne Haapea
Jouko Miettunen
Sari Lindeman
Matti Joukamaa
Hannu Koponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. marianne.haapea@oulu.fi
Source
Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2010 Jun;19(2):88-96
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Cohort Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medical History Taking - methods
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Disclosure
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To compare self-reported (SR) medication use and pharmacy data for major psychoactive medications and three classes of medications used for different indications, and to determine the socio-economic factors associated with the congruence.
Postal questionnaire data collected in 1997 were compared with the register of the Social Insurance Institution of Finland on the reimbursed prescriptions purchased during 1997. Altogether 7625 subjects were included in this study. Drugs were categorized according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) system.
Kappa values were 0.77, 0.68, 0.84, 0.92 and 0.55 for antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiepileptics, antidiabetics and beta-blocking agents, respectively. Prevalence-adjusted and bias-adjusted kappa values were almost perfect (0.98-1.00). Reliability of antipsychotics use was better for married subjects than for those who were not married; and of antidepressants use for highly educated and married subjects than for those who were less educated and were not married. Altogether 414 (5.4%) responders and 285 (7.1%) non-responders had used at least one of the selected medications.
Agreement between the SR and pharmacy data was moderate for psychoactive medication use. Even though data collected by postal questionnaire may underestimate the prevalence of medication use due to non-participation it can be assumed accurate enough for study purposes.
PubMed ID
20209650 View in PubMed
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Agricultural, socioeconomic and environmental variables as risks for human verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) infection in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130372
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2011;11:275
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Katri Jalava
Jukka Ollgren
Marjut Eklund
Anja Siitonen
Markku Kuusi
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. katri.jalava@thl.fi
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2011;11:275
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Environmental Exposure
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Molecular Typing
Risk factors
Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Socioeconomic Factors
Virulence Factors - genetics
Abstract
Verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) is the cause of severe gastrointestinal infection especially among infants. Between 10 and 20 cases are reported annually to the National Infectious Disease Register (NIDR) in Finland. The aim of this study was to identify explanatory variables for VTEC infections reported to the NIDR in Finland between 1997 and 2006. We applied a hurdle model, applicable for a dataset with an excess of zeros.
We enrolled 131 domestically acquired primary cases of VTEC between 1997 and 2006 from routine surveillance data. The isolated strains were characterized by virulence type, serogroup, phage type and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. By applying a two-part Bayesian hurdle model to infectious disease surveillance data, we were able to create a model in which the covariates were associated with the probability for occurrence of the cases in the logistic regression part and the magnitude of covariate changes in the Poisson regression part if cases do occur. The model also included spatial correlations between neighbouring municipalities.
The average annual incidence rate was 4.8 cases per million inhabitants based on the cases as reported to the NIDR. Of the 131 cases, 74 VTEC O157 and 58 non-O157 strains were isolated (one person had dual infections). The number of bulls per human population and the proportion of the population with a higher education were associated with an increased occurrence and incidence of human VTEC infections in 70 (17%) of 416 of Finnish municipalities. In addition, the proportion of fresh water per area, the proportion of cultivated land per area and the proportion of low income households with children were associated with increased incidence of VTEC infections.
With hurdle models we were able to distinguish between risk factors for the occurrence of the disease and the incidence of the disease for data characterised by an excess of zeros. The density of bulls and the proportion of the population with higher education were significant both for occurrence and incidence, while the proportion of fresh water, cultivated land, and the proportion of low income households with children were significant for the incidence of the disease.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22008456 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and suicide mortality by age among Finnish men, 1950-1991.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213371
Source
Addiction. 1996 Jan;91(1):101-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
P. Mäkelä
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Addiction. 1996 Jan;91(1):101-12
Date
Jan-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - mortality
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
An earlier comparative time series analysis of the connection between per capita alcohol consumption and suicide mortality reported, unexpectedly, a non-significant effect of alcohol on the suicide rate of Finnish men. However, the suicide rate of Finnish men is heterogeneous in regard to age groups. There is also indication that the connection between alcohol and suicides is stronger in younger than in older age groups. Time series data on per capita alcohol consumption and age-specific suicide mortality in 1950-91 were used to scrutinize the relationship. The results indicate that the suicide rate of Finnish men in age groups 15-34 years and 35-49 years is associated with per capita alcohol consumption, while no connection could be established between the suicide rates of men aged 50-69 years and 70+ years and either per capita alcohol consumption or a lagged consumption measure. Real income, divorce rate and unemployment rate were regarded as possible confounding variables.
PubMed ID
8822018 View in PubMed
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532 records – page 1 of 54.