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Aggressiveness of screen-detected breast cancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215968
Source
Lancet. 1995 Jan 28;345(8944):221-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-28-1995
Author
M. Hakama
K. Holli
J. Isola
O P Kallioniemi
A. Kärkkäinen
T. Visakorpi
E. Pukkala
I. Saarenmaa
U. Geiger
J. Ikkala
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Tampere, Finland.
Source
Lancet. 1995 Jan 28;345(8944):221-4
Date
Jan-28-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - prevention & control
DNA, Neoplasm - analysis
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Flow Cytometry
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Mammography
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Abstract
It is not clear whether screening for breast cancer works as public health policy and whether early indicators of effect predict an ultimate reduction in mortality. The malignant potentials of 248 breast cancers detected by the screening service in Finland were compared with those of 490 control cancers diagnosed before the screening service was established. Aggressiveness was assessed by DNA flow cytometry and clinical status by cancer size and node involvement. After the first screening round, the results of DNA flow cytometry were the same in cancers diagnosed by screening and in controls; these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the biological aggressiveness of breast cancer remains constant as the cancer progresses. The proportion of patients with node-negative and small T1 cancers after the first screening was higher among the screened population than among controls, indicating earliness of diagnosis among those screened. Cancers diagnosed in the first round had a low malignant potential, as indicated by the DNA flow-cytometry and by clinical stage. Lower aggressiveness of cancers found by screening than of control cancers would indicate overdiagnosis or length-biased sampling, but not earliness of diagnosis. Screening with mammography is practised as a public-health policy in Finland. The results predict that the mortality reduction found in randomised trials can be repeated with a screening service.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1995 Apr 1;345(8953):853; author reply 854-57898236
Comment In: Lancet. 1995 Apr 1;345(8953):854; author reply 854-57898238
Comment In: Lancet. 1995 Apr 1;345(8953):853-4; author reply 854-57898237
PubMed ID
7741862 View in PubMed
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Arterial disease but not hypertension predisposes to varicose veins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157258
Source
Phlebology. 2008;23(3):142-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
L A Mäkivaara
T M Ahti
T. Luukkaala
M. Hakama
J O Laurikka
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, 33014 University of Tampere, Finland. liisa.makivaara@uta.fi
Source
Phlebology. 2008;23(3):142-6
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Peripheral Vascular Diseases - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Varicose Veins - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to find out if persons with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) (arterial disease or hypertension) have additional risk of varicose veins (VV) compared with those without arterial disease (AD) or hypertension.
We studied, using a validated questionnaire, the prevalence and incidence of VVs in those with and without CVD in a population of 4903 including 40-, 50- and 60-year-old men and women in Tampere, Finland. During the five years of follow-up, we had a special interest on the appearance of new VVs in those without VVs at entry (n = 3065).
We found a higher prevalence of VVs in persons with CVD than in those without CVD (with sex and age adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.3 [95% confidence interval, CI 1.1-1.5]). The prevalence of VVs was higher in persons with AD (OR 1.7 [CI 1.4-2.2]), but not in persons with hypertension (OR 1.1 [CI 0.9-1.2]) than in those who were free of AD or hypertension, respectively. Subjects with AD had higher incidence of VVs (incidence odds ratio, IOR 1.4 [CI 0.8-2.7]) than subjects without AD and the effect was statistically significant in women (IOR 2.2 [CI 1.1-4.5]). Also the incidence of VVs was more affected by AD than by hypertension (IOR 1.1 [CI 0.7-1.8]).
There seems to exist a relatively strong additional risk of VVs in persons with AD and practically none in those with hypertension compared to those without.
PubMed ID
18467624 View in PubMed
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Association of non-urological diseases with lower urinary tract symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192043
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2001 Oct;35(5):377-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
J. Koskimäki
M. Hakama
H. Huhtala
T L Tammela
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Tampere University Hospital, Finland. jkoskimaki@koti.tpo.fi
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2001 Oct;35(5):377-81
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comorbidity
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Prostatic Hyperplasia - complications
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Urination Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Clinical observations indicate that many non-urological diseases seem to be associated with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This has also been shown in studies usually concerning single diseases. This study investigated the impact of non-urological diseases on LUTS in the general population.
A questionnaire on LUTS and medical history was mailed to all 50-, 60- and 70 year-old men in Tampere and in 11 municipalities in the same county, in total 3143 subjects. Day-time frequency, nocturia, urge, urge incontinence, hesitancy and incomplete emptying were used to form an index for LUTS. The men were asked to report any disease that they had. The number of the following diseases reported by the participants was large enough for statistical analysis: lower back pain, hypertension, arthritis, heart disease, pulmonary disease, diabetes, constipation. stroke, transient ischaemic attack, cancer (other than prostate or bladder), neurological disease, inguinal hernia, rheumatoid arthritis and faecal incontinence. The association between LUTS and non-urological diseases was estimated by logistic regression as a prevalence odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).
In the multivariate analysis a significant association was found between LUTS and the following diseases: faecal incontinence (OR 4.5, CI 2 .3-9.1), neurological disease (OR 2.4, CI 1.3-4.4), constipation (OR 2.3, CI 1.5-3.3) and arthritis (OR 1.5, CI 1.2-2.0).
According to this population-based study LUTS is an important part of the symptomatology of faecal incontinence, neurological disease, constipation and arthritis. Thus, the patients with these diseases and presenting with LUTS require careful investigation, at least in the cases in which the primary therapy of LUTS has failed.
PubMed ID
11771864 View in PubMed
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Biological, physical, mental and social dimensions of breast cancer: information based on routine case notes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222227
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1993;29A(15):2152-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
K. Holli
M. Hakama
Author Affiliation
Oncology Clinic, Tampere University Hospital, Kangasala, Finland.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1993;29A(15):2152-5
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - psychology - rehabilitation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Abstract
551 patients were diagnosed with breast cancer in Tampere University Hospital district, Finland between 1977 and 1980. The number of follow-up visits during the first 5 years was 8248. The biological, physical, mental and social dimensions of breast cancer were measured by death, recurrence of disease, Karnofsky score, physical or mental symptoms, and sick leave. The prevalence rates of an event and the incidence rates of the appearance or disappearance of an event were used to determine the indicators for these different dimensions of breast cancer. The study was based on hospital case notes. Data on death, recurrence, sick leave and Karnofsky score were well recorded, but physical or mental symptoms were recorded infrequently. There was a 4-fold difference between the highest and lowest prevalence for the different dimensions, but the trends were similar by follow-up time. The variation was also large for the incidence rates but the trends differed with length of follow-up time. The biological, physical, mental and social consequences of breast cancer differ in magnitude and have different trends over time, indicating that breast cancer is a different disease depending on the dimension and on the indicator under consideration.
PubMed ID
8297655 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer screening as public health policy in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225416
Source
Br J Cancer. 1991 Nov;64(5):962-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
Author
M. Hakama
L. Elovainio
R. Kajantie
K. Louhivuori
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1991 Nov;64(5):962-4
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Mammography
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Public Health
Abstract
A nationwide mammographic screening for breast cancer was started in Finland in 1987. During the first 2 years of the organised screening programme, 126,000 women were invited. Most of them (103,000) belonged to the birth year cohort in the 50-59 years' age groups. Among the 112,000 screenees, 418 cancers (0.4%) were found. Specificity of the test was about 96%. The screening prevalence was 2.4 times the annual incidence and a minimum estimate for the detection rate among those invited was 1.6 times that among those not invited. These estimates indicate a relatively low test and programme sensitivity. The final effectiveness of a public health policy cannot be predicted on the basis of limited preventive trials, and there is need to evaluate also a public health policy by experimental means.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1984 Jun 2;1(8388):1222-46144933
Cites: Lancet. 1984 Jun 2;1(8388):1224-66144934
Cites: Lancet. 1985 Apr 13;1(8433):829-322858707
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1985 Oct;52(4):669-734063143
Cites: Lancet. 1990 Feb 3;335(8684):241-61967717
Cites: Int J Cancer. 1988 Nov 15;42(5):697-7023182106
Cites: BMJ. 1988 Oct 15;297(6654):943-83142562
Cites: Duodecim. 1989;105(18):1532-82806143
Cites: Lancet. 1988 Feb 20;1(8582):411-22893206
PubMed ID
1931626 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk among glass factory workers: an excess of lung cancer?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227888
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1990 Dec;47(12):815-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
R. Sankila
S. Karjalainen
E. Pukkala
H. Oksanen
T. Hakulinen
L. Teppo
M. Hakama
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1990 Dec;47(12):815-8
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemical Industry
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glass
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
A total of 3749 workers employed for at least three months in two Finnish glass factories (cohorts A and B) were followed up for cancer in 1953-86 through the Finnish Cancer Registry. In cohort A (1353 men, 1261 women), 106 primary cancers were diagnosed among men, and their standardised incidence ratio (SIR) for all cancers was 99. Among women the risk was low (65 cases, SIR 64). In cohort B (450 men, 685 women), the relative risk of cancer was close to unity for both men (57 cases) and women (75 cases). The risk of cancer was analysed by primary site, type of work, years since first exposure, and age at diagnosis. The only significantly increased risks were those of lung cancer among men (SIR 130, 95% CI 100-167, cohorts A and B combined), and skin cancer among glass blowers (SIR 625, 95% CI 129-1827). An increased risk of lung, stomach, and colon cancer as well as of brain tumours has been reported in previous studies. It is postulated that the excess risk of lung cancer, detected in this study, can also be accounted for by lifestyle, and not only by possible occupational exposures, because a similar excess risk of lung cancer has been found previously for all industrial workers in Finland. Although the risk of stomach cancer in this study was increased among glass blowers, it was not high in the largest groups of plain glass workers. The risks of tumours of the central nervous system and colon were not increased either.
Notes
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1980 May;37(2):180-47426468
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1983;4(4):565-756869381
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1983 Sep;12(3):290-66629617
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1984 Oct;10(5):325-66523098
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1985 Jun;42(6):411-44005195
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1986 Oct;77(4):883-93020298
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1989;15(6):699-7172665480
Cites: J Occup Med. 1987 Jan;29(1):66-83819887
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1987;24(7):601-63589754
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1987 Oct;13(5):412-63433043
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1988;13(1):105-183344750
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1988 Jul;45(7):450-83395581
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1987 Feb;78(2):253-73468289
PubMed ID
2271387 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular drug use and the incidence of erectile dysfunction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167958
Source
Int J Impot Res. 2007 Mar-Apr;19(2):208-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Shiri
J. Koskimäki
J. Häkkinen
A. Auvinen
T L J Tammela
M. Hakama
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. r_shiri@yahoo.com
Source
Int J Impot Res. 2007 Mar-Apr;19(2):208-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angiotensin II - antagonists & inhibitors
Calcium Channel Blockers - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Diuretics - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Erectile Dysfunction - chemically induced - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
It is unclear whether high blood pressure per se or antihypertensive drug use causes erectile dysfunction (ED). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cardiovascular diseases and their concomitant medications use on the incidence of ED. The target population consisted of men aged 55, 65 or 75 years old residing in the study area in Finland in 1999. Questionnaires were mailed to 2837 men in 1999 and to 2510 of them 5 years later. The follow-up sample consisted of 1665 men (66% of those eligible) who responded to both baseline and follow-up questionnaires. Men free of moderate or severe ED at baseline (N=1000) were included in the study. ED was assessed by two questions on subject ability to achieve or maintain an erection sufficient for intercourse. Poisson regression model was used in the multivariable analyses. The risk of ED was higher in men suffering from treated hypertension or heart disease than in those with the untreated condition. The risk of ED was higher in men using calcium channel inhibitor (adjusted relative risk (RR)=1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-2.4), angiotensin II antagonist (RR=2.2, 95% CI 1.0-4.7), non-selective beta-blocker (RR=1.7, 95% CI 0.9-3.2) or diuretic (RR=1.3, CI 0.7-2.4) compared with non-users. ED was not associated with using organic nitrates, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, selective beta-blockers and serum lipid-lowering agents. In summary, calcium channel inhibitors, angiotensin II antagonists, non-selective beta-blockers and diuretics may increase the risk of ED.
PubMed ID
16900205 View in PubMed
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Cervical cancer incidence and mortality trends in Finland and Estonia: a screened vs. an unscreened population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222004
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1993;29A(5):745-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
T. Aareleid
E. Pukkala
H. Thomson
M. Hakama
Author Affiliation
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Tallinn, Estonia.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1993;29A(5):745-9
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Socioeconomic Factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
Long term trends in the incidence of and mortality from invasive cervical cancer have been studied in Finland (1953-1987) and Estonia (1968-1987). The analyses are based on the data from the Finnish and Estonian Cancer Registries. An organised nationwide screening programme for cervical cancer was started in Finland in the early 1960s. In Estonia, no cytological screening programme has been introduced, and cervical malignancies are diagnosed in routine gynaecological practice. During 1968-1987, both the incidence of and mortality from cervical cancer were considerably higher in Estonia than in Finland. A decrease has taken place in the cervical cancer incidence and mortality in both countries since the mid-1960s, but whereas in Finland the decrease has been marked, in Estonia it has been less pronounced and levelled off in the 1980s. In 1987, the age-standardised (world population) incidence rate per 100,000 women was 14.0 in Estonia and 3.8 in Finland, and the age-standardised mortality rate was 6.0 and 1.6 per 100,000, respectively. The difference in the incidence of the disease in the two neighbouring countries can be partially attributed to socioeconomic factors. The main reason for the different slopes of the trend curves for cervical cancer is probably the difference in public health policies: an effective mass screening programme is being conducted in Finland but not in Estonia.
PubMed ID
8471334 View in PubMed
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Chernobyl fallout and outcome of pregnancy in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63840
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Feb;109(2):179-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
A. Auvinen
M. Vahteristo
H. Arvela
M. Suomela
T. Rahola
M. Hakama
T. Rytömaa
Author Affiliation
STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki, Finland. anssi.auvinen@stuk.fi
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Feb;109(2):179-85
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Power Plants
Pregnancy - radiation effects
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
Possible effects of Chernobyl fallout on outcome of pregnancy in Finland were evaluated in a nationwide follow-up study. The outcomes were the rate of live births and stillbirths, pregnancy loss, and induced abortions by municipality. Exposure was assessed based on nationwide surveys of radiation dose rate from the Chernobyl fallout, from both external and internal exposures. Using these measurements, we estimated the monthly dose rate for each of the 455 Finnish municipalities. On average, the dose rate from Chernobyl fallout reached 50 microSv per month in May 1986--a doubling of the natural background radiation. In the most heavily affected area, 4 times the normal background dose rates were recorded. Given the underlying regional differences in live birth, stillbirth, and abortion rates, we used longitudinal analysis comparing changes over time within municipalities. A temporary decline in the live birth rate had already begun before 1986, with no clear relationship to the level of fallout. A statistically significant increase in spontaneous abortions with dose of radiation was observed. No marked changes in induced abortions or stillbirths were observed. The decrease in the live birth rate is probably not a biological effect of radiation, but more likely related to public concerns of the fallout. The effect on spontaneous abortions should be interpreted with caution, because of potential bias or confounding. Further, there is little support in the epidemiologic literature on effects of very low doses of radiation on pregnancy outcome.
PubMed ID
11266330 View in PubMed
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Defining expected mortality in occupational studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246852
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1979 Sep;5(3):297-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1979
Author
K. Vinni
M. Hakama
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1979 Sep;5(3):297-303
Date
Sep-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Censuses
Finland - epidemiology
Healthy Worker Effect
Humans
Life expectancy
Mortality - trends
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Abstract
The mortality in a reference population for specific occupations was evaluated by means of occupational studies of different designs. The data originated from a random sample of 19,862 persons from among the total Finnish population. The age standardized mortality for those who had at any time belonged to the active work force in Finland was estimated to be 10% less than the average mortality for the total population. The difference was 20% if the currently active work force was compared with the total population. The standardized mortality ratio was 70% for those who had stayed for less than 10 years within the same occupational category and 80% for those with more than 10 years' work within the same occupational category. The expected mortality varied up to 50% depending on the broad occupational category and on the occupational history when compared with the total mortality in Finland.
PubMed ID
20120579 View in PubMed
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71 records – page 1 of 8.