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9762 records – page 1 of 977.

Distal myopathies in Finnish patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288206
Source
Duodecim. 2016;132(18):1635-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
Johanna Palmio
Manu Jokela
Satu Sandell
Tiina Suominen
Sini Penttilä
Bjarne Udd
Source
Duodecim. 2016;132(18):1635-44
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Distal Myopathies - epidemiology - genetics
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Abstract
Distal myopathies are a group of rare muscular dystrophies comprising more than 20 different genetic entities. The first distal myopathy in Finland, tibial muscular dystrophy, was identified more than 20 years ago. Muscle weakness predominantly affects the feet and hands, although variable weakness can be detected clinically and on muscle MRI in the proximal muscles in the later stages of the disease. Advanced molecular genetic techniques have enabled identification of several distinct distal myopathies in Finland. The clinical findings of different distal myopathies overlap, but there are also distinguishable differences that might help final genetic diagnostics.
PubMed ID
29188941 View in PubMed
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Prostate cancer, a challenge for the next millennium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202240
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1999;88(1):3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
T. Lehtonen
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1999;88(1):3
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
PubMed ID
10230674 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of intestinal and diffuse types of gastric carcinoma: a time-trend study in Finland with comparison between studies from high- and low-risk areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218716
Source
Cancer. 1994 Mar 1;73(5):1533
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1994
Author
A. Amorosi
D. Palli
Source
Cancer. 1994 Mar 1;73(5):1533
Date
Mar-1-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Notes
Comment On: Cancer. 1993 May 15;71(10):2926-338490820
PubMed ID
8111723 View in PubMed
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Commentary: Income and health: why are curves so appealing?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191720
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2001 Dec;30(6):1405-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
G. Der
Author Affiliation
MRC Social & Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow, 4 Lilybank Gardens, Glasgow G12 8RZ, Scotland.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2001 Dec;30(6):1405-6
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Income
Mortality - trends
Notes
Comment On: Int J Epidemiol. 2001 Dec;30(6):1397-40511821353
PubMed ID
11821354 View in PubMed
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Serum cholesterol and mortality in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222746
Source
BMJ. 1992 Nov 7;305(6862):1157
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-7-1992
Author
A. Macnair
Source
BMJ. 1992 Nov 7;305(6862):1157
Date
Nov-7-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cholesterol - blood
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - mortality
Mortality
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 1992 Sep 26;305(6856):757-91298234
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Jun 1;135(11):1251-81626541
PubMed ID
1463962 View in PubMed
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The effect of resurfacing on friction, speeds and safety on main roads in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205629
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1998 Jan;30(1):75-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
L. Leden
O. Hämäläinen
E. Manninen
Author Affiliation
Technical Research Centre of Finland, Finland. lars.leden@vtt.fi
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1998 Jan;30(1):75-85
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - mortality
Automobile Driving
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Abstract
This study aimed at examining how resurfacing and the first winter period after resurfacing affect the safety of main roads in Finland. The study consisted of three substudies. In the first substudy the changes of side friction and lock braking friction were measured on newly paved roads after resurfacing and after the first winter period. The effect of different resurfacing methods was also compared in the course of the study. All the 50 road sections in the study were resurfaced in summer 1991 and measured with the friction truck of the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). Friction was found to be highly dependent on the type of resurfacing treatment. In general, the friction of surfaces with high coefficients after resurfacing decrease and the lowest frictions increase with time, locked braking friction values immediately after resurfacing can be undesirably low. The second substudy dealt with the effect of resurfacing on the vehicle speeds. The analysis was based on automatic speed and weather measurement in 1991 and 1992 on resurfaced roads, which were resurfaced in the summer 1991 and on a sample of comparison roads which had not been resurfaced. There is little change in speeds on the non-resurfaced roads during the study period, but there is some indication that resurfacing increases the average speeds, at least when the road is dry. Complete data were available for only one site, where the result was that average speeds on dry roads increased after resurfacing by 0.6 km/h and increased still more (by 0.5 km/h) after the first winter period. The third substudy analysed fatal and injury accidents reported to the police on the resurfaced and comparison roads one and two years before, the same year resurfacing was performed and one and two years after the resurfacing. The accident results were similar to the speed findings. The most likely effect is a risk increase immediately after resurfacing by somewhat less than 7% and of 3 to 7% of the first winter period. These results are, however, subject to large uncertainty because of the small number of accidents on the treatment roads.
PubMed ID
9542547 View in PubMed
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[Triumphal march of cancer therapy goes on].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269715
Source
Duodecim. 2015;131(22):2163-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Heikki Joensuu
Source
Duodecim. 2015;131(22):2163-70
Date
2015
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Neoplasms - mortality - therapy
Prognosis
Survival Rate
Abstract
Therapeutic results for cancer have gradually improved. The relative five-year survival rate of those affected with the disease already exceeds 65% in Finland. New cancer therapies play an indisputable role in the improvement of the prognosis. Besides therapy and its availability, many other causes may also have a considerable effect on the survival of affected persons, making comparison of regional survival rates unreliable as a measure of cancer treatment. The review deals with factors affecting the survival of persons having cancer and includes descriptions of some of the most recent cancer treatments and a discussion about the challenges of developing cancer therapies.
PubMed ID
26749910 View in PubMed
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Source
Hum Reprod. 1996 Mar;11(3):683-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
V E Lund
J I Mäkinen
Source
Hum Reprod. 1996 Mar;11(3):683-4
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Ectopic - epidemiology
Seasons
Notes
Comment On: Hum Reprod. 1994 Oct;9(10):19687844237
Comment On: Hum Reprod. 1994 Apr;9(4):742-58046033
PubMed ID
8671296 View in PubMed
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Role of temperature in reported chickenpox cases in northern European countries: Denmark and Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295476
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2018 Jun 13; 11(1):377
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-13-2018
Author
Ayako Sumi
Author Affiliation
Department of Hygiene, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, S-1, W-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8556, Japan. sumi@sapmed.ac.jp.
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2018 Jun 13; 11(1):377
Date
Jun-13-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Chickenpox - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Seasons
Temperature
Abstract
In this study, we sought to explore the temperature-dependent transition of patterns of reported chickenpox cases in the northern European countries of Denmark and Finland to help determine the potential relationship with epidemiological factors of the disease. We performed time-series analysis consisting of a spectral analysis based on the maximum entropy method in the frequency domain and the nonlinear least squares method in the time domain, using the following time-series data: monthly data of reported chickenpox cases and mean temperatures in the pre-vaccination era for Denmark and Finland. The results were compared with those reported for China and Japan in our previous studies.
Time-series data of chickenpox cases for both Denmark and Finland showed a peak each winter, resulting in a unimodal cycle. For investigating the origin of the unimodal cycle, we set the contribution ratio of the 1-year cycle, Q1, as the contribution of the amplitude of a 1-year cycle, to the entire amplitude of the time-series data. The Q1 values for both countries clearly showed a positive correlation with the annual mean temperature of each country. The mean temperature substantially influenced the incidence of chickenpox in both countries.
Notes
Cites: Trop Med Int Health. 1998 Nov;3(11):886-90 PMID 9855401
Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2017 Aug 3;17 (1):538 PMID 28774264
Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2015 Nov 03;15:495 PMID 26530702
Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2016 Apr 22;16:179 PMID 27102884
Cites: Int J Dermatol. 2007 Apr;46(4):362-6 PMID 17442073
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2015 Sep;143(12):2666-78 PMID 25586860
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2013 May;141(5):905-15 PMID 22814610
PubMed ID
29895325 View in PubMed
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Increasing homicide rate in Finland accompanied by decreasing seasonality over the period 1957-95.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203443
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1998 Dec;47(11):1695-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
H. Hakko
P. Räsänen
J. Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
University of Oulu, Department of Psychiatry, Finland.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1998 Dec;47(11):1695-8
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland - epidemiology
Homicide - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Seasons
Abstract
Homicide is recognized as a global public health problem. Finland has the highest overall homicide rate of the Nordic countries in comparisons over short time periods. Using the 39-year time series of homicide incidents in Finland from 1957-95, we analyzed the trend in homicide rate. In addition, we explored for the first time over the time trend in the seasonal variation of homicide and compared seasonal statistics over eight successive time periods. The present study revealed that there has been steadily increasing trend in homicides in Finland since 1950s. At the same time, the seasonality of homicide has decreased markedly. The peaks in homicide rates occurred commonly during summer and the troughs during winter.
PubMed ID
9877340 View in PubMed
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9762 records – page 1 of 977.