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1658 records – page 1 of 166.

A 5-year retrospective analysis of employer-provided dental care for Finnish male industrial workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206874
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Ahlberg
R. Tuominen
H. Murtomaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. jari.ahlberg@helsinki.fi
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Dental Association
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis
Dental Records
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Finland - epidemiology
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient Education as Topic
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Root Canal Therapy
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
The treatment-mix, treatment time, and dental status of 268 male industrial workers entitled to employer-provided dental care were studied. The data were collected from treatment records of the covered workers over the 5-year period 1989-93. Treatment time was based on clinical treatment time recorded per patient visit, and the treatment procedure codes were reclassified into a treatment-mix according to American Dental Association categories, with a modification combining endodontics and restorative treatment. The mean number of check-ups followed by prescribed treatment (treatment courses) during the 5 years was 3.7 among those who had entered the in-house dental care program prior to the monitored period (old attenders). Their treatment time was stable, 57-63 min per year, while the first-year mean treatment time (170 min) of those who had entered the program during the study period (new attenders) was significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
9429814 View in PubMed
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The 10-year COPD Programme in Finland: effects on quality of diagnosis, smoking, prevalence, hospital admissions and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135938
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):178-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Vuokko L Kinnula
Tuula Vasankari
Eva Kontula
Anssi Sovijarvi
Olli Saynajakangas
Anne Pietinalho
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. vuokko.kinnula@helsinki.fi
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):178-83
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Diagnostic Techniques, Respiratory System - standards
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation - methods
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
The Finnish National Programme for Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) 1998-2007 was set up to reduce the prevalence of COPD, improve COPD diagnosis and care, reduce the number of moderate to severe cases of the disease, and reduce hospitalisations and treatment costs due to COPD. Over 900 events for 25,000 participating healthcare workers were arranged. The major strengths of this programme included multidisciplinary strategies and web-based guidelines in nearly all primary health care centres around the country.
Data from national registries, epidemiological studies and questionnaires were used to measure whether the goals had been reached.
The prevalence of COPD remained unchanged. Smoking decreased in males from 30% to 26% (p
Notes
Comment In: Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):109-1021603847
PubMed ID
21431275 View in PubMed
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A 13-year follow-up of a comprehensive program of fissure sealing and resealing in Varkaus, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189084
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2002 Jun;60(3):174-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
E. Lavonius
E. Kerosuo
S. Kervanto-Seppälä
N. Halttunen
T. Vilkuna
I. Pietilä
Author Affiliation
University of Helsinki, Institute of Dentistry, Finland. e.lavonius@btinternet.com
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2002 Jun;60(3):174-9
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bicuspid
Child
Cohort Studies
DMF Index
Dental Bonding
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Molar
Pit and Fissure Sealants - therapeutic use
Retreatment
Retrospective Studies
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
The objective of the study was to examine the coverage of the sealing program on first permanent molars (FPMs) and second permanent molars (SPMs) and first and second premolars (FSPMs), as well as to monitor the fate of the sealed teeth over time. All patients born in 1977 who had had regular check-ups in the Varkaus Health Center, Finland (n = 166) were included in the 1996 study. Data on the annual state of each tooth had been collected retrospectively since 1983. The coverage for the sealant program was 95%, 92%, and 6% of the FPMs, SPMs, and FSPMs, respectively. Out of the FPMs sealed at age 6 years, 28% were subjected to resealing, 13% developed occlusal, and 15% proximal caries during a 13-year follow-up period. From the SPMs sealed at age 11 years, 24% were subjected to resealing, 4% developed occlusal caries, and less than 2% proximal caries during the 9-year follow-up. None of the sealed FSPMs and only 1% of the non-sealed ones developed occlusal caries during the 9-year period. The mean DMF in the study population (n = 160) at age 12 years was 0.8 (n = 124), compared to a nation-wide mean value of 1.2. A large percentage of the FPMs and SPMs were sealed and then resealed during the study period. Although the study design lacked a control group for comparison, the lower caries rates of this study compared to the results of other studies with only a single application of sealants suggest a major role for resealing.
PubMed ID
12166912 View in PubMed
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The ability of the ICD-AIS map to identify seriously injured patients in road traffic accidents-A study from Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299598
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2018; 19(8):819-824
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Noora Airaksinen
Ilona Nurmi-Lüthje
Heikki Kröger
Peter Lüthje
Author Affiliation
a Faculty of Heath Sciences , University of Eastern Finland , Kuopio , Finland.
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2018; 19(8):819-824
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Abbreviated Injury Scale
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Medical Records - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In Finland, the severity of road traffic injuries is determined using the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Finnish Modification (ICD-10-FM) injury codes from Finnish Hospital Discharge data and the automatic conversion tool (ICD-AIS map) developed by the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine (AAAM). The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of the ICD-AIS map to identify seriously injured patients due to traffic accidents in Finnish injury data by comparing the severity rating generated by an expert and by the ICD-AIS map.
Our data came from the North Kymi Hospital (level 2 trauma center at the time of the study). The data included 574 patients who were injured in traffic accidents during 2 years. The severity rating (Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale [MAIS] 3+) of each patient was recorded retrospectively by an expert based on information from patient records. In addition, the rating was generated from ICD-10 injury codes by the ICD-AIS map conversion tool. These 2 ratings were compared by road user categories and the strength of agreement was described using Cohen's kappa.
The proportion of seriously injured patients was 10.1% as defined by the expert and 6.6% as generated by the ICD-AIS map; exact agreement was 65.5%. The highest concordance was for pedestrians (exact agreement 100%) and the weakest for moped drivers and motorcyclists (46.7%). Furthermore, the overall strength of agreement of the severity ratings (slightly or seriously injured) between the expert and the ICD-AIS map was good (??=?0.70). Most (65%) of the conversion problems were misclassifications caused by the simplicity of the Finnish ICD-10 injury codes compared to the injury codes used in the ICD-AIS map. In Finland, the injuries are recorded mainly with 4-digit codes and, infrequently, with 5-digit codes, whereas the ICD-AIS map defines up to 6-digit codes.
For this sample of simplified ICD-10-FM codes, the ICD-AIS map underestimated the number of seriously injured patients. The mapping result could be improved if at least open and closed fractures of extremities and visceral contusions and ruptures had separate codes. In addition, there were a few injury codes that should be considered for inclusion in the map.
PubMed ID
30543466 View in PubMed
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ABO blood group and Achilles tendon rupture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213168
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1996;85(4):369-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
J. Leppilahti
J. Puranen
S. Orava
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1996;85(4):369-71
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - blood
Achilles Tendon - injuries
Adult
Age Distribution
Athletic Injuries - blood - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Rupture - blood - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The association between ABO blood groups and Achilles tendon (AT) ruptures was studied in 215 consecutive AT rupture patients treated at Oulu University Hospital during the 16-year period from 1979 to 1994 as compared with control material consisting of earlier blood group determinations performed on an unselected sample of 5,536 young Finnish male adults. There was no blood group O dominance or other statistical differences in ABO blood groups between the patients with AT rupture and the control population (chi 2 3.79, P = 0.28), the A/O ratio being 1.82 in the rupture group and 1.42 in the controls. We found no blood group O dominance in competitive athletes, recreational athletes or non-athletes, in patients with sports-related AT ruptures or non-sports-related ruptures and in younger ( or = 45--years) patients. In conclusion, our results do not confirm early findings of blood group O dominance in patients with AT rupture.
PubMed ID
9014069 View in PubMed
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The ABO blood-group distribution of 450 Swedish patients with Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111664
Source
Neurology. 1966 Oct;16(10):1051-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1966

Absence of human bocavirus from deceased fetuses and their mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146525
Source
J Clin Virol. 2010 Feb;47(2):186-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Anita Riipinen
Elina Väisänen
Anne Lahtinen
Riitta Karikoski
Mika Nuutila
Heljä-Marja Surcel
Helena Taskinen
Klaus Hedman
Maria Söderlund-Venermo
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FIN-00250 Helsinki, Finland. anita.riipinen@ttl.fi
Source
J Clin Virol. 2010 Feb;47(2):186-8
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - etiology
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Female
Fetal Death - etiology
Fetus - virology
Finland - epidemiology
Heart - virology
Human bocavirus - isolation & purification
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Liver - virology
Middle Aged
Parvoviridae Infections - epidemiology - virology
Placenta - virology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - virology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
The human bocavirus (HBoV), a newly discovered parvovirus, is closely related to the bovine parvovirus and the canine minute virus, which are known to cause adverse pregnancy outcomes. Another human parvovirus, B19, can lead to fetal hydrops, miscarriage and intrauterine fetal death (IUFD).
To determine the prevalence of HBoV DNA in aborted fetuses and IUFDs. The HBoV serology of the mothers was also studied.
We retrospectively studied all available fetuses (N=535) autopsied during 7/1992-12/1995, and 1/2003-12/2005 in Helsinki, Finland. All available formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded fetal tissues - placenta, heart and liver - of 120 miscarriages, 169 IUFDs, and 246 induced abortions were studied by quantitative PCR. We also measured the HBoV IgM and IgG antibodies in the corresponding maternal sera (N=462) mostly of the first trimester. The IgM-positive sera underwent HBoV PCR.
None of the fetal tissues harbored HBoV DNA. A total of 97% (448/462) of the mothers were positive for IgG antibodies to HBoV, while only 0.9% (4/462) exhibited HBoV-specific IgM antibodies without viremia or respiratory symptoms. One IgM-positive mother had an unexplained fetal loss.
We did not find HBoV DNA in any of the deceased fetuses. Almost all pregnant women were HBoV-IgG positive.
PubMed ID
20031484 View in PubMed
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Absences for sickness among children in day care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36550
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1992 Nov;81(11):929-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
M. Möttönen
M. Uhari
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1992 Nov;81(11):929-32
Date
Nov-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Child
Child Day Care Centers - standards - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Finland - epidemiology
Food Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hygiene
Infant
Morbidity
Multivariate Analysis
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Parents
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Social Class
Abstract
The number of days of absence because of sickness, recorded for all children in one city in Finland, cared for in municipal day care over a period of 2.5 years, was collected from the monthly figures kept by the city council office for accounting purposes. The average number of days of absence per child was 24 per year at child-care centers and 9 in family care (p
PubMed ID
1467617 View in PubMed
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Acceptability and profile of the clinical drug trials underway in Finnish university hospitals in the 1990s: applications reviewed by ethics committees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192044
Source
Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Sep;23(7):415-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
T. Keinonen
S. Nieminen
V. Saareks
V. Saano
P. Ylitalo
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Kuopio, Finland. tuija.keinonen@medfiles.fi
Source
Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Sep;23(7):415-23
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Protocols - standards
Clinical Trials Data Monitoring Committees - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Trials as Topic - standards - statistics & numerical data
Ethics Committees, Research - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Informed Consent - statistics & numerical data
Multicenter Studies as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Patient Selection
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Research Design - standards - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
There is scarce information in literature about the decisions made by ethics committees concerning the clinical studies they have reviewed. A retrospective, detailed review of 666 applications, their amendments and the ethics committees' statements was undertaken. All protrocols of clinical studies on medicinal products submitted to and reviewed by the ethics committees of two university hospitals during the years 1992, 1994, 1996 and 1998 were investigated. Most of the studies were international (50%), multicenter (71%), phase III trials (41%) on a new clinical entity, (38%). Validity of the clinical drug study applications was acceptable in more than half of the cases (364; 55%), while 91 (14%) were approved with advisory comments, 153 (23%) had to be amended, 35 (5%) were left pending and 23 (3%) were rejected. Most of the questions pertained to informed consent and the study protcol. In accordance with precious results, our findings support the opinion that the submitted documents need to be improved, especially with regard to informed consent and study protocols, in order to gain better Good Clinical Practice (GCP) compliance. Well-defined, documented operating procedures of the ethics committees would have facilitated the practical issues in the review process.
PubMed ID
11771857 View in PubMed
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1658 records – page 1 of 166.