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4th annual telemedicine program review. Part 2: United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68966
Source
Telemed Today. 1997 Aug;5(4):30-8, 42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Source
Gerontologist. 2016 Oct;56(5):795-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Olga Strizhitskaya
Source
Gerontologist. 2016 Oct;56(5):795-9
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Ethnic Groups
Financial Support
Financing, Government
Health Policy
Humans
Middle Aged
Poverty
Public Policy
Retirement
Russia
Abstract
Russia has always been at an intersection of Western and Eastern cultures, with its dozens of ethnic groups and different religions. The federal structure of the country also encompasses a variety of differences in socioeconomic status across its regions. This diversity yields complexity in aging research; aging people in Russia differ in terms of nationality, religion, political beliefs, social and economic status, access to health care, income, living conditions, etc. Thus, it is difficult to control for all these factors or to draw a picture of an "average" Russian older adult. Nevertheless, there is a great deal of research on aging in Russia, mainly focusing on biomedical and social aspects of aging. Most such research is based in the Central and Western regions, whereas the Siberian and Far East regions are underrepresented. There is also a lack of secondary databases and representative nationwide studies. Social policy and legislation address the needs of older adults by providing social services, support, and protection. The retirement system in Russia enables adults to retire at relatively young ages-55 and 60 years for women and men, respectively-but also to maintain the option of continuing their professional career or re-establishing a career after a "vocation" period. Though in recent years the government has faced a range of political issues, affecting the country's economy in general, budget funds for support of aging people have been maintained.
PubMed ID
26884065 View in PubMed
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Alternative approaches to dealing with respondent uncertainty in contingent valuation: a comparative analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129888
Source
J Environ Manage. 2012 Jan;93(1):130-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Roberto Martínez-Espiñeira
Nikita Lyssenko
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's A1C 5S7, NL, Canada. rmartinezesp@mun.ca
Source
J Environ Manage. 2012 Jan;93(1):130-9
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bias (epidemiology)
Conservation of Natural Resources - economics
Data Collection
Financial Support
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Logistic Models
Models, Economic
Newfoundland and Labrador
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Uncertainty
Whales
Abstract
Several strategies have been proposed to deal with response uncertainty in contingent valuation. One approach, often applied to address issues of hypothetical bias, recodes and/or reweights responses according to stated levels of certainty but so far few analyses compare alternative recoding and reweighting strategies. We explore the choice among alternative strategies that exploit a numerical certainty scale obtained from a follow-up to the payment question in a valuation survey about a whale conservation program. Two novel variations of previously followed approaches perform best on our dataset in terms of the efficiency of estimates. The first one uses an exponential transformation of the numerical certainty scale as a weight in the willingness to pay regression. The other one is based on constructing a continuous willingness to pay variable with the highly certain "yes" and "no" original responses to the payment question as extreme values and with mid-point values that correspond to the original "don't know" responses. We find, though, that the effect of using different treatment strategies on mean willingness to pay is rarely statistically significant and we fail to detect a consistent effect on the efficiency of the estimation regardless of the strategy applied.
PubMed ID
22054579 View in PubMed
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An analysis of alternative funding for physicians practicing gynecologic oncology in Ontario, Canada prior to 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170125
Source
Eur J Gynaecol Oncol. 2006;27(1):61-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
L. Elit
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
Source
Eur J Gynaecol Oncol. 2006;27(1):61-4
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Fee-for-Service Plans
Female
Financial Management
Financial Support
Gynecology - economics - standards
Humans
Male
Medical Oncology - economics - standards
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - economics
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns - economics - standards
Reimbursement Mechanisms - organization & administration
Risk factors
Abstract
To consider the policy issue of physician reimbursement by examining the events that preceded the Ontario Gynecologic Oncologists moving from a fee-for-service environment to an alternate payment plan in 2001.
The sources of information included a literature search, reviewing Canadian newspapers, interactions with key leaders in the field (Ontario Medication Association, University physicians), and meeting minutes from both university and provincial groups considering alternate payment plans.
The problem for Ontario Gynecologic Oncologists involved the goal of providing excellent clinical care, undergraduate and postgraduate education, research and administration in the midst of problems with recruitment, retention and remuneration. Multiple causes for this problem included limitations in health care spending and a fee for service payment schedule that did not adequately reimburse complex care. This funding problem got on the agenda as a result of a front page article in the national newspaper and letters of concern solicited from local members of the provincial parliament. The policy formulation needed to account for alternate financial options and the roles of institutional structures such as the universities, Cancer Care Ontario and the Ontario University Health Science Centers. The influences on the evolution of the new funding policy included the actors, their interests, their values, research on the topic and institutions.
The tensions between the goal of excellence in care, education, research and administration and difficulties with recruitment, retention and reimbursement, led the Ontario Gynecologic Oncologists to seek an alternate mechanism of reimbursement from the fee-for-service model.
PubMed ID
16550972 View in PubMed
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Baseline status of paediatric oncology care in ten low-income or mid-income countries receiving My Child Matters support: a descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92673
Source
Lancet Oncol. 2008 Aug;9(8):721-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Ribeiro Raul C
Steliarova-Foucher Eva
Magrath Ian
Lemerle Jean
Eden Tim
Forget Caty
Mortara Isabel
Tabah-Fisch Isabelle
Divino Jose Julio
Miklavec Thomas
Howard Scott C
Cavalli Franco
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology and International Outreach Program, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA. raul.ribeiro@stjude.org
Source
Lancet Oncol. 2008 Aug;9(8):721-9
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - economics - standards
Child Welfare - economics
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Developing Countries
Female
Financial Support
Health Care Surveys
Health Expenditures
Humans
Income
Infant
Male
Medical Oncology - economics - organization & administration - standards
Neoplasms - mortality - therapy
Pediatrics - economics - standards
Program Evaluation
Risk assessment
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Childhood-cancer survival is dismal in most low-income countries, but initiatives for treating paediatric cancer have substantially improved care in some of these countries. The My Child Matters programme was launched to fund projects aimed at controlling paediatric cancer in low-income and mid-income countries. We aimed to assess baseline status of paediatric cancer care in ten countries that were receiving support (Bangladesh, Egypt, Honduras, Morocco, the Philippines, Senegal, Tanzania, Ukraine, Venezuela, and Vietnam). METHODS: Between Sept 5, 2005, and May 26, 2006, qualitative face-to-face interviews with clinicians, hospital managers, health officials, and other health-care professionals were done by a multidisciplinary public-health research company as a field survey. Estimates of expected numbers of patients with paediatric cancer from population-based data were used to project the number of current and future patients for comparison with survey-based data. 5-year survival was postulated on the basis of the findings of the interviews. Data from the field survey were statistically compared with demographic, health, and socioeconomic data from global health organisations. The main outcomes were to assess baseline status of paediatric cancer care in the countries and postulated 5-year survival. FINDINGS: The baseline status of paediatric oncology care varied substantially between the surveyed countries. The number of patients reportedly receiving medical care (obtained from survey data) differed markedly from that predicted by population-based incidence data. Management of paediatric cancer and access to care were poor or deficient (ie, nonexistent, unavailable, or inconsistent access for most children with cancer) in seven of the ten countries surveyed, and accurate baseline data on incidence and outcome were very sparse. Postulated 5-year survival were: 5-10% in Bangladesh, the Philippines, Senegal, Tanzania, and Vietnam; 30% in Morocco; and 40-60% in Egypt, Honduras, Ukraine, and Venezuela. Postulated 5-year survival was directly proportional to several health indicators (per capita annual total health-care expenditure [Pearson's r(2)=0.760, p=0.001], per capita gross domestic product [r(2)=0.603, p=0.008], per capita gross national income [r(2)=0.572, p=0.011], number of physicians [r(2)=0.560, p=0.013] and nurses [r(2)=0.506, p=0.032] per 1000 population, and most significantly, annual government health-care expenditure per capita [r(2)=0.882, p
Notes
Comment In: Lancet Oncol. 2008 Aug;9(8):703-418672209
PubMed ID
18672210 View in PubMed
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A call for mandatory aid project registration: Who's doing what and where?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160354
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Nov;53(11):1841-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007

Canada's new medical school: The Northern Ontario School of Medicine: social accountability through distributed community engaged learning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147622
Source
Acad Med. 2009 Oct;84(10):1459-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Roger P Strasser
Joel H Lanphear
William G McCready
Maureen H Topps
D Dan Hunt
Marie C Matte
Author Affiliation
Northern Ontario School of Medicine, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6, Canada. roger.strasser@normed.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2009 Oct;84(10):1459-64
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Clinical Clerkship - organization & administration
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - economics - organization & administration - trends
Financial Support
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration - standards
Medically underserved area
Models, Educational
Ontario
Physicians - supply & distribution
Program Development
Rural Population
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Social Responsibility
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Like many rural regions around the world, Northern Ontario has a chronic shortage of doctors. Recognizing that medical graduates who have grown up in a rural area are more likely to practice in the rural setting, the Government of Ontario, Canada, decided in 2001 to establish a new medical school in the region with a social accountability mandate to contribute to improving the health of the people and communities of Northern Ontario. The Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM) is a joint initiative of Laurentian University and Lakehead University, which are located 700 miles apart. This paper outlines the development and implementation of NOSM, Canada's first new medical school in more than 30 years. NOSM is a rural distributed community-based medical school which actively seeks to recruit students into its MD program who come from Northern Ontario or from similar northern, rural, remote, Aboriginal, Francophone backgrounds. The holistic, cohesive curriculum for the MD program relies heavily on electronic communications to support distributed community engaged learning. In the classroom and in clinical settings, students explore cases from the perspective of physicians in Northern Ontario. Clinical education takes place in a wide range of community and health service settings, so that the students experience the diversity of communities and cultures in Northern Ontario. NOSM graduates will be skilled physicians ready and able to undertake postgraduate training anywhere, but with a special affinity for and comfort with pursuing postgraduate training and clinical practice in Northern Ontario.
PubMed ID
19881443 View in PubMed
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76 records – page 1 of 8.