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148 records – page 1 of 15.

AARN applauds Romanow Report. Urges all levels of government to work together to improve health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186148
Source
Alta RN. 2003 Jan;59(1):1, 4-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003

Aboriginal health programming under siege, critics charge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120994
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Oct 2;184(14):E739-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2-2012
Author
Paul Christopher Webster
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Oct 2;184(14):E739-40
Date
Oct-2-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Federal Government
Financial Management - economics
Health Services Research - economics
Health Services, Indigenous - economics
Humans
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 2012 Oct 16;184(15):1715-6; author reply 171623073677
PubMed ID
22949561 View in PubMed
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Act No. 372 of 7 June 1989 on registered partnerships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38223
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1989;16:56
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1989;16:56
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Denmark
Developed Countries
Divorce
Economics
Europe
Financial Management
Homosexuality
Legislation
Marriage
Ownership
Scandinavia
Sexual Behavior
Social Welfare
Socioeconomic Factors
Taxes
Wills
Abstract
This Danish law authorizes persons of the same sex to register their partnership and be treated legally in most cases as persons in heterosexual partnerships are treated, notably with respect to marriage, divorce, succession, and social and tax laws. Nonetheless, persons in such partnerships are not treated the same as heterosexuals with respect to adoption of children and the right to obtain a religious celebration of their partnership.
PubMed ID
12344468 View in PubMed
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Actor or arena: contrasting translations of a law on interorganizational integration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117925
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2012;26(6):778-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Johanna Andersson
Mikael Löfström
Susanna Bihari Axelsson
Runo Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden. johanna.andersson@nhv.se
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2012;26(6):778-93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Budgets
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Financial Management - legislation & jurisprudence
Financing, Government
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Models, organizational
Rehabilitation, Vocational - economics
Social Work - economics - organization & administration
Sweden
Abstract
A Swedish framework law has enabled integration between public agencies in vocational rehabilitation. With the support of this law, coordination associations can be formed to fund and organize joint activities. The purpose of this study is to describe and analyze how the law has been interpreted and translated into local coordination associations and how local institutional logics have developed to guide the organization of these associations.
Data was collected through observations of meetings within two coordination associations and supplemented with documents. The material was analyzed by compilation and examination of data from field notes, whereupon the most important aspects were crystallized and framed with institutional organization theory.
Two different translations of the law were seen in the associations studied: the association as an independent actor, and as an arena for its member organizations. Two subsequent institutional logics have developed, influencing decisions on autonomy, objectives and rationality for initiating and organizing in the two associations and their activities. The institutional logics are circular, further enhancing the different translations creating different forms of integration.
Both forms of integration are legitimate, but the different translations have created integration with different degrees of autonomy in relation to the member organizations. Only a long-term analysis can show whether one form of integration is more functional than the other.
This article is based on an extensive material providing insights into a form of interorganizational integration which has been scarcely researched. The findings show how different translations can influence the integration of welfare services.
PubMed ID
23252326 View in PubMed
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[[Aging of the population and social policy: lessons from Sweden].]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73181
Source
Jinkogaku Kenkyu. 1994 May;(17):5-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
N. Maruo
Source
Jinkogaku Kenkyu. 1994 May;(17):5-14
Date
May-1994
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Birth rate
Demography
Developed Countries
Economics
Employment
English Abstract
Europe
Fertility
Financial Management
Financing, Government
Health Manpower
Income
Marriage
Population
Population Characteristics
Population Dynamics
Scandinavia
Social Security
Sweden
Abstract
"In this paper I tried to show how the ageing of the population influences the change in the growth of employment, employment structure, the savings ratio, economic growth and the cost of social security [in Sweden]. In the latter part of the paper I suggested a close correlation between the average marriage age of women, the total fertility rate and the work participation ratio of women." (SUMMARY IN ENG)
PubMed ID
12319307 View in PubMed
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Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1987 Jan;144(1):107-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1987
Author
J L Schrader
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1987 Jan;144(1):107-9
Date
Jan-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Financial Management - legislation & jurisprudence
Financing, Government - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Mental Health Services - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
State Government
United States
Abstract
The Alaska mental health program is endowed with a 1-million-acre trust fund. A coalition of groups that make up the mental health constituency of the state united in a lawsuit to establish the trust. The history of this legacy, the struggle to realize its benefits, its current status, and some of its psychopolitical significance are discussed.
PubMed ID
3799827 View in PubMed
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America's elderly: policy implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6039
Source
Popul Bull. 1981;35(4 Supplement):1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
M. Barberis
Source
Popul Bull. 1981;35(4 Supplement):1-13
Date
1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Americas
Delivery of Health Care
Demography
Dependency (Psychology)
Developed Countries
Economics
Employment
Financial Management
Financing, Government
Government Programs
Health
Health Facilities, Proprietary
Health services
Housing
Income
Men
North America
Old Age Assistance
Organization and Administration
Population
Population Characteristics
Population Dynamics
Public Policy
Social Class
Social Security
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Women
Abstract
Senior citizens, particularly those aged 75 or older, are the fastest growing group in the US today. 25 million strong, the elderly make up 11% of the total population, the proportion ranging from 18.1% in Florida to 2.6% in Alaska. 1/4 of the federal budget, $155 billion in 1980, now goes to their support yet many face difficulty in gaining access to the programs designed to benefit them. The elderly, especially those who rely solely on Social Security, comprise a disproportionate share of all poor households. The retirement system itself is facing financing challenges that promise to grow as the baby boom generation swells the number of senior citizens to 55 million in 2030. Plans to coordinate government programs and improve the method of financing the retirement system are receiving increasing attention. Financing Social Security from revenue funds, or with actuarial reserves, are 2 alternatives to the present pay-as-you-go system. Another area of concern to policymakers is America's health care system, which is now crisis oriented and heavily biased toward institutionalization. Health care must be made more responsive to the long-term needs of the oldest segment of the population, many of whom suffer from chronic illnesses. Impaired elderly receive most of their care from family or friends, and private organizations, but this natural support network largely has been ignored by government. New program initiatives might emphasize homemaker services, geriatric day care, compensation for families that provide for the needs of an elderly relative, and the strengthening of the informal partnership between the elderly themselves, their families and friends, community groups, private organizations, and government at the state and local as well as the federal level.
PubMed ID
12146279 View in PubMed
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An analysis of alternative funding for physicians practicing gynecologic oncology in Ontario, Canada prior to 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170125
Source
Eur J Gynaecol Oncol. 2006;27(1):61-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
L. Elit
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
Source
Eur J Gynaecol Oncol. 2006;27(1):61-4
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Fee-for-Service Plans
Female
Financial Management
Financial Support
Gynecology - economics - standards
Humans
Male
Medical Oncology - economics - standards
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - economics
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns - economics - standards
Reimbursement Mechanisms - organization & administration
Risk factors
Abstract
To consider the policy issue of physician reimbursement by examining the events that preceded the Ontario Gynecologic Oncologists moving from a fee-for-service environment to an alternate payment plan in 2001.
The sources of information included a literature search, reviewing Canadian newspapers, interactions with key leaders in the field (Ontario Medication Association, University physicians), and meeting minutes from both university and provincial groups considering alternate payment plans.
The problem for Ontario Gynecologic Oncologists involved the goal of providing excellent clinical care, undergraduate and postgraduate education, research and administration in the midst of problems with recruitment, retention and remuneration. Multiple causes for this problem included limitations in health care spending and a fee for service payment schedule that did not adequately reimburse complex care. This funding problem got on the agenda as a result of a front page article in the national newspaper and letters of concern solicited from local members of the provincial parliament. The policy formulation needed to account for alternate financial options and the roles of institutional structures such as the universities, Cancer Care Ontario and the Ontario University Health Science Centers. The influences on the evolution of the new funding policy included the actors, their interests, their values, research on the topic and institutions.
The tensions between the goal of excellence in care, education, research and administration and difficulties with recruitment, retention and reimbursement, led the Ontario Gynecologic Oncologists to seek an alternate mechanism of reimbursement from the fee-for-service model.
PubMed ID
16550972 View in PubMed
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148 records – page 1 of 15.