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An increasing proportion of infants weigh more than 4000 grams at birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47667
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2001 Oct;80(10):931-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
J. Ørskou
U. Kesmodel
T B Henriksen
N J Secher
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Epidemiological Research Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. joerskou@hotmail.com
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2001 Oct;80(10):931-6
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Birth weight
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Fetal Macrosomia - epidemiology - etiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To investigate how mean birthweight has changed in the past decade, and to describe changes in the proportion of infants with a birthweight above 4000 grams (g). METHODS: We analyzed data on 43,561 singleton infants born between 1990 and 1999 at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Information on birthweight, gestational age, stillbirths, malformations, mode of delivery, prelabor intervention, and maternal diabetes was obtained from birth registration forms. RESULTS: For all infants mean birthweight increased by 45 g (95% CI: 20-70 g) from 3474 g in 1990 to 3519 g in 1999. For infants born at term the mean increase was 62 g (95% CI: 41-83 g). During the same period the percentage of infants born with a birthweight above 4000 g increased from 16.7% in 1990 to 20.0% in 1999 (p
PubMed ID
11580738 View in PubMed
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Blood glucose limits in the diagnosis of impaired glucose tolerance during pregnancy. Relation to morbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35184
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1995 Sep;74(8):589-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995
Author
E. Nord
U. Hanson
B. Persson
Author Affiliation
Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Hospital/Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1995 Sep;74(8):589-93
Date
Sep-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Comparative Study
Female
Fetal Macrosomia - epidemiology - etiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hyperbilirubinemia - epidemiology - etiology
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy in Diabetics - blood
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the accuracy of diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) by a 2-h blood glucose value > or = 9.0 mmol/l in the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The maternal and neonatal outcome in women with a 2-h blood glucose value just below this limit, 8.0-8.9 mmol/l, is analyzed. The outcome is compared to a randomly selected control group. DESIGN. A comparative study. SUBJECTS. There were 223 women in the group with a 2-h value of 8.0 to 8.9 mmol/l in the OGTT. This group was compared to a randomly selected control group of 391 women. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. Fetal outcome: perinatal mortality, birth weight, respiratory disturbances, symptomatic hypoglycemia, polycythemia, hyperbilirubinemia and traumatic deliveries. Maternal age, body mass index (BMI), pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) or preeclampsia and route of delivery. RESULTS. The women in the group with a 2-h glucose value of 8.0-8.9 mmol/l were, compared to the control group, significantly older, heavier, had a higher BMI, gave birth to heavier children and a significantly increased number of large-for-date infants, while there were no differences in neonatal mortality, morbidity or birth trauma. CONCLUSIONS. This study shows that using the 75 g 2-h OGTT with a B-glucose limit of > or = 9.0 mmol/l instead of > or = 8.0 mmol/l to diagnose GDM during pregnancy has no major adverse effects concerning maternal and neonatal outcome in the borderline interval of 8.0 to 8.9 mmol/l.
PubMed ID
7660761 View in PubMed
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Elevated serum squalene and cholesterol synthesis markers in pregnant obese women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267234
Source
J Lipid Res. 2014 Dec;55(12):2644-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Helena E Miettinen
Kristiina Rönö
Saila Koivusalo
Beata Stach-Lempinen
Maritta Pöyhönen-Alho
Johan G Eriksson
Timo P Hiltunen
Helena Gylling
Source
J Lipid Res. 2014 Dec;55(12):2644-54
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Birth weight
Body mass index
Cholesterol - biosynthesis - blood
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Fetal Macrosomia - epidemiology - etiology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Obesity - blood - physiopathology
Phytosterols - blood
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Risk
Sitosterols - blood
Squalene - blood
Abstract
We examined serum cholesterol synthesis and absorption markers and their association with neonatal birth weight in obese pregnancies affected by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Pregnant women at risk for GDM (BMI >30 kg/m?) were enrolled from maternity clinics in Finland. GDM was determined from the results of an oral glucose tolerance test. Serum samples were collected at six time-points, one in each trimester of pregnancy, and at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months postpartum. Analysis of serum squalene and noncholesterol sterols by gas-liquid chromatography revealed that in subjects with GDM (n = 22), the serum ?8-cholestenol concentration and lathosterol/sitosterol ratio were higher (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
25301963 View in PubMed
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[Fetal macrosomia is still a great problem of maternal diabetes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192228
Source
Duodecim. 1998;114(21):2253-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
K. Teramo
Author Affiliation
HYKS:n naistenklinikka PL 140 00029 HYKS. kari.teramo@huch.fi
Source
Duodecim. 1998;114(21):2253-9
Date
1998
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diabetes, Gestational - complications
Female
Fetal Macrosomia - epidemiology - etiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - complications
PubMed ID
11757116 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Obstet Gynecol Surv. 1999 Mar;54(3):203-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
J D Hoffman
K. Ward
Author Affiliation
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.
Source
Obstet Gynecol Surv. 1999 Mar;54(3):203-10
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Diabetes, Gestational - complications - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Macrosomia - epidemiology - etiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Tens of thousands of children deliver before they are full term each year. Although many social, environmental, and medical risk factors have been suggested, the etiology of a large percentage of preterm labor cases is still unknown. It has been noted for many years that preterm delivery is a condition that runs in families. Evidence concerning its aggregation among families, the recurrent nature of preterm labor, and its differing prevalence between races has led to the suggestion of a genetic cause for preterm delivery. There have been few formal studies to investigate this hypothesis. We suggest that modern molecular biology approaches can reveal the part that genes play in preterm delivery.
PubMed ID
10071840 View in PubMed
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Influence of pre-eclampsia on fetal growth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47390
Source
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2003 Mar;13(3):157-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
R. Xiao
T K Sorensen
M A Williams
D A Luthy
Author Affiliation
Center for Perinatal Studies, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98122, USA.
Source
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2003 Mar;13(3):157-62
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Birth weight
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Fetal Macrosomia - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Maternal Age
Medical Records
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Regression Analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We examined the effect of pre-eclampsia on fetal growth in a cohort of pregnant women delivering singleton infants. METHODS: Analyses were restricted to 155 women with pre-eclampsia and 5570 normotensive women. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) after adjusting for confounders. We estimated ORs for very low birth weight (VLBW;
Notes
Comment In: J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2003 Mar;13(3):145-612820834
PubMed ID
12820837 View in PubMed
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Large baby syndrome in singletons born after frozen embryo transfer (FET): is it due to maternal factors or the cryotechnique?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256879
Source
Hum Reprod. 2014 Mar;29(3):618-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
A. Pinborg
A A Henningsen
A. Loft
S S Malchau
J. Forman
A Nyboe Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hvidovre Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Kettegaard Allé 30, Hvidovre DK-2650, Denmark.
Source
Hum Reprod. 2014 Mar;29(3):618-27
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Cryopreservation - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
Embryo Transfer - adverse effects - methods
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - adverse effects
Fetal Macrosomia - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Abstract
Are singletons born after frozen embryo transfer (FET) at increased risk of being born large for gestational age (LGA) and if so, is this caused by intrinsic maternal factors or related to the freezing/thawing procedures?
Singletons after FET have an increased risk of being born LGA. This cannot solely be explained by intrinsic maternal factors as it was also observed in sibling pairs, where the sibling conceived after FET had an increased risk of LGA compared with the sibling born after Fresh embryo transfer.
FET singletons have a higher mean birthweight than singletons born after transfer of fresh embryos, and FET singletons may be at an increased risk of being born LGA.
The national register-based controlled cohort study involves two populations of FET singletons. The first population (A: total FET cohort) consisted of all FET singletons (n = 896) compared with singletons born after Fresh embryo transfer (Fresh) (n = 9480) and also with that born after natural conception (NC; n = 4510) in Denmark from 1997 to 2006. The second population (B: Sibling FET cohort) included all sibling pairs, where one singleton was born after FET and the consecutive sibling born after Fresh embryo transfer or vice versa from 1994 to 2008 (n = 666). The sibling cohort included n = 550 children with the sibling combination first child Fresh/second child FET and n = 116 children with the combination first child FET/second child Fresh.
Main outcome measures were LGA defined as birthweight of >2 SD from the population mean (z-score >2) according to Mars?ls curves. Macrosomia was defined as birthweight of >4500 g. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (AORs) of LGA and macrosomia were calculated for FET versus Fresh and versus NC singletons in the total FET cohort. Similarly, AOR was calculated for FET versus Fresh in the sibling cohort. Adjustments were made for maternal age, parity, child sex, year of birth and birth order in the sibling analyses. Meta-analyses were performed by pooling our data with the previously published cohort studies on LGA and macrosomia.
The AORs of LGA (z-score >2) and macrosomia in FET singletons versus singletons conceived after Fresh embryo transfer were 1.34 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.98-1.80] and 1.91 (95% CI 1.40-2.62), respectively. The corresponding risks for FET versus NC singletons were 1.41 (95% CI 1.01-1.98) for LGA and 1.67 (95% CI 1.18-2.37) for macrosomia. The increased risk of LGA and macrosomia in FET singletons was confirmed in the sibling cohort also after adjustment for birth order. Hence, the increased risk of LGA in FET singletons cannot solely be explained by being the second born or by intrinsic maternal factors, but may also partly be related to freezing/thawing procedures per se. In the meta-analysis, the summary effects of LGA and macrosomia in FET versus singletons conceived after Fresh embryo transfer were AOR 1.54 (95% CI 1.31-1.81) and AOR 1.64 (95% CI 1.26-2.12), respectively. The corresponding figures for FET versus NC singletons were for LGA AOR 1.32 (95% CI 1.07-1.61) and macrosomia AOR 1.41 (95% CI 1.11-1.80), respectively.
Adjustment for body mass index as a possible confounder was not possible. The size of the FET/Fresh sibling cohort was limited; however, the complete sibling cohort was sufficiently powered to explore the risk of LGA. A bias is very unlikely as data coding was based on national registers.
Our findings are consistent with the previous Nordic studies and thus can be generalized to the Nordic countries. The causes for LGA in FET singletons should be further explored.
No external funding was used for this project. None of the authors have any conflict of interest to declare.
PubMed ID
24413766 View in PubMed
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Maternal and neonatal outcomes in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes. a nation-wide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273641
Source
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2015;28(14):1720-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Per Glud Ovesen
Dorte Møller Jensen
Peter Damm
Steen Rasmussen
Ulrik Schiøler Kesmodel
Source
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2015;28(14):1720-4
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apgar score
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Macrosomia - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Abstract
To estimate the association between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes in Denmark.
A population-based cohort study including all singleton pregnancies in Denmark from 2004 to 2010 (n?=?403?092). Maternal complications during pregnancy and delivery and fetal complications were classified according to the International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision.
The final study population consisted of 398?623 women. Of these, 9014 (2.3%) had GDM. Data were adjusted for maternal age, parity, smoking, gestational age, birth weight, BMI, gender of the fetus and calendar year. The risk of preeclampsia, caesarean section (both planned and emergency) and shoulder dystocia was increased in women with GDM. In the unadjusted analysis, the risk of thrombosis was increased by a factor 2 in the GDM patients, but in the adjusted analysis this association disappeared. Post-partum hemorrhage was similar in the two groups. The GDM women had an increased risk of giving birth to a macrosomic neonate although the unadjusted analysis did not show any difference between the two groups. Low Apgar score was increased in the GDM, but this association disappeared in the adjusted analysis. Stillbirth was comparable in the two groups.
Women with GDM still have increased incidence of obstetric and neonatal complications, which could imply that treatment of women with GDM should be tightened.
PubMed ID
25228278 View in PubMed
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Maternal characteristics and lifestyle factors and the risk of delivering high birth weight infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9691
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Jul;102(1):115-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Janne Ørskou
Tine Brink Henriksen
Ulrik Kesmodel
Niels Jørgen Secher
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Epidemiological Research Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. joerskou@hotmail.com
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Jul;102(1):115-20
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Analysis of Variance
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Exercise
Female
Fetal Macrosomia - epidemiology - etiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Life Style
Male
Maternal Age
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - methods
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Saudi Arabia - epidemiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with an increased risk of giving birth to infants weighing more than 4000 g and to study whether changes in these factors over time can explain the increasing proportion of high birth weight infants over the last decade. METHODS: Our analyses included 24,093 pregnancies of nondiabetic women with information on potential risk factors for high birth weight: maternal prepregnancy weight, height, age, parity, smoking habits, alcohol and caffeine intake, marital status, educational level, gestational age, and infant gender. Information was obtained from questionnaires completed during pregnancy and birth registration forms at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, from 1990 to 1999. RESULTS: We found a statistically significantly increased risk of giving birth to infants weighing more than 4000 g for women with high prepregnancy weight and height, parity greater than 2, gestational age greater than 42 weeks, and male infant gender and for nonsmokers. Women with a low caffeine intake or 10 or more years of education were also at statistically significantly higher risk. The variation found in birth weight over the past 10-year period was explained by changes in maternal prepregnancy weight, height, smoking habits, educational level, and caffeine intake over the same period. CONCLUSION: Risk factors associated with a higher proportion of high birth weight infants may be clinically significant and have an impact on public health. High birth weight increases the risk of adverse outcomes of delivery as well as the risk of childhood morbidity.
PubMed ID
12850616 View in PubMed
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Maternal nutritional status, diabetes and risk of macrosomia among Native Canadian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205969
Source
Early Hum Dev. 1998 Feb 27;50(3):293-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-27-1998
Author
L E Caulfield
S B Harris
E A Whalen
M E Sugamori
Author Affiliation
Center for Human Nutrition, Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
Source
Early Hum Dev. 1998 Feb 27;50(3):293-303
Date
Feb-27-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Female
Fetal Macrosomia - epidemiology - etiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Nutritional Status
Ontario
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - complications
Risk factors
Abstract
Multivariate methods were used to identify risk factors for macrosomia (birth weight > 4000 g) among 741 singleton births to Native Canadian women from Sioux Lookout Zone, Ontario, Canada, in 1990-1993. The average birth weight was 3691 +/- 577 g, and 29.2% of infants weighed more than 4000 g at birth. Macrosomic infants were born at later gestational ages and were more likely to be male. Women delivering macrosomic infants were taller, entered pregnancy with higher body mass indexes (BMI) and gained more weight during pregnancy, but were less likely to smoke cigarettes. They were more likely to have previously delivered a macrosomic infant and to have had gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Risk of macrosomia was associated with maternal glycemic status; women with pre-existing diabetes were at greatest risk, followed by those with GDM A2 (fasting glucose > or = 6 mmol/l). Women with GDM A1 (fasting glucose
PubMed ID
9548033 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.