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47 records – page 1 of 5.

Alcohol consumption and time to recognition of pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168892
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2006 Nov;10(6):467-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Erika M Edwards
Martha M Werler
Author Affiliation
Data Coordinating Center, Boston University School of Public Health, 715 Albany St, 580, Boston, MA 02118, USA. eedwards@bu.edu
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2006 Nov;10(6):467-72
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Awareness
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Fetal Development - drug effects
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Menstrual Cycle - drug effects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unplanned
Pregnant Women - psychology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Risk-Taking
Time Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Despite warnings to abstain from alcohol, American women who are or could become pregnant still drink. This study evaluates whether women who consume alcohol are at an increased risk of recognizing pregnancy later than women who do not, adjusting for confounding factors that have been associated with alcohol consumption during pregnancy.
The sample included 863 control women from a multisite case-control study conducted from 1996 to 2002 in the United States and Canada. Telephone interviews were conducted with mothers by trained nurse interviewers who administered standardized questionnaires on demographic and reproductive factors, and pregnancy exposures.
Alcohol consumption was classified as none (42.0%), occasional (31.9%), regular (15.6%), and heavy (10.5%). Time to recognition of pregnancy was calculated as the date pregnancy was suspected minus the last menstrual period date (median: 31 days; range: 7-227 days). Unadjusted Cox proportional hazard models found that regular drinkers, but not heavy drinkers, had a significantly higher risk of recognizing pregnancy later than non-drinkers. However, this association went away after adjustment for demographic factors. Among women with unplanned pregnancies, heavy alcohol intake was associated with a 45% increased hazard ratio, compared to 0.80 for women with planned pregnancies; however, this finding was not statistically significant.
While time to pregnancy recognition did not vary among drinkers and non-drinkers, results from this study reiterate previous findings that pregnant women consume alcohol, and that drinkers share social and demographic characteristics that could be used to target public health interventions.
PubMed ID
16763772 View in PubMed
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An assessment of the developmental, reproductive, and neurotoxicity of endosulfan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89883
Source
Birth Defects Res B Dev Reprod Toxicol. 2009 Feb;86(1):1-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Silva Marilyn H
Gammon Derek
Author Affiliation
Department of Pesticide Regulation, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812, USA. msilva@cdpr.ca.gov
Source
Birth Defects Res B Dev Reprod Toxicol. 2009 Feb;86(1):1-28
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Autistic Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Databases, Factual
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Embryo, Mammalian - embryology
Endocrine Disruptors - classification - toxicity
Endosulfan - classification - toxicity
Female
Fetal Development - drug effects
Humans
Infertility, Male - epidemiology - etiology
Inhalation Exposure
Insecticides - classification - toxicity
Male
Nervous System Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level
Pesticide Residues - toxicity
Pregnancy
Rabbits
Rats
Reproduction - drug effects
Risk assessment
Spermatozoa - drug effects
Teratogens - classification - toxicity
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Endosulfan has been used for over 50 years. Although most analogs have been discontinued, endosulfan has less environmental persistence. Nevertheless, pressure groups are lobbying for a worldwide ban. The reasons are: possible rodent male reproductive toxicity, other endocrine effects and cancer; human epidemiology, and exposure studies; residues appearing in remote areas of the world, e.g., the Arctic. METHODS: The endosulfan toxicology database is described and risks of its use assessed. RESULTS: Endosulfan is an antagonist at the GABA(A) receptor Cl(-) ionophore in mammalian CNS. Rat acute toxicity is moderate, LD(50)=48 (M) or 10 mg/kg/d (F), oral gavage; 130 (M), 70 mg/kg/d (F) dermal; LC(50)=34.5 microg/L (M), 12.6 microg/L (F), inhalation. Critical NOELs for risk assessment: acute oral (gavage)=0.7 mg/kg/d (rabbit developmental); Subchronic oral (diet)=1.2 mg/kg/d (rat reproduction); Chronic oral (diet)=0.6 mg/kg/d. There were no acceptable dermal toxicity studies. The critical acute and subchronic inhalation NOELs=0.001 mg/L, chronic inhalation=0.0001 mg/L (estimated). Toxicity to rat sperm occurred at doses causing neurotoxicity. Endocrine effects, resulting from P450 oxygenase(s) induction, were reversible. Increased cancer, genotoxicity, or histopathology in rodents was not observed in any organ. Possible effects on brain biogenic amine levels were probably secondary. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiology and rodent studies suggesting autism and male reproductive toxicity are open to other interpretations. Developmental/ reproductive toxicity or endocrine disruption occurs only at doses causing neurotoxicity. Toxicity to the fetus or young animals is not more severe than that shown by adults.
PubMed ID
19243027 View in PubMed
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Birth outcome and risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia following in utero exposure to pivmecillinam: a population-based cohort study with 414 exposed pregnancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58620
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2001;33(6):439-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
H. Larsen
G L Nielsen
M. Møller
F. Ebbesen
H C Schønheyder
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital and Aalborg Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2001;33(6):439-44
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Amdinocillin Pivoxil - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Carnitine - deficiency
Denmark - epidemiology
Embryonic and Fetal Development - drug effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypoglycemia - chemically induced
Infant, Newborn
Penicillins - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Urinary Tract Infections - drug therapy
Abstract
Concerns have been raised as to the safety of using pivaloyl-conjugated beta-lactam antibiotics during pregnancy as they cause carnitine depletion. Restrictions have been recommended in some Scandinavian countries as drug-induced carnitine depletion could constitute a risk to the developing foetus. One of these drugs, pivmecillinam, is widely used against urinary tract infections but few data exist concerning its safety in pregnancy. In a cohort study, we compared the prevalences of congenital abnormalities, pre-term delivery, low birth weight, low Apgar score and neonatal hypoglycaemia in the offspring of 414 women who had at least 1 prescription for pivmecillinam redeemed during pregnancy with those of the offspring of 7472 pregnant women for whom no drugs were prescribed during pregnancy. The prevalence of congenital abnormalities was 1.7% among 119 infants exposed in the first trimester and 3.7% among the reference group [odds ratio (OR) 0.46; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11-1.86]. We found no significantly increased risks in either pre-term delivery (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.11-1.86), low birth weight (OR 0.57, 95%, CI 0.23-1.41), low Apgar score (OR 2.32, 95% CI 0.30-18.16) or hypoglycaemia (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.18-3.00) that were induced by carnitine depletion. No significantly increased risk in adverse birth outcome was therefore found in women treated with pivmecillinam.
PubMed ID
11450863 View in PubMed
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Body dimensions of infants exposed to antiepileptic drugs in utero: observations spanning 25 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58737
Source
Epilepsia. 2000 Jul;41(7):854-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
K. Wide
B. Winbladh
T. Tomson
B. Källén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Sachs' Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Epilepsia. 2000 Jul;41(7):854-61
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticonvulsants - adverse effects - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Birth Weight - drug effects
Body Height
Carbamazepine - adverse effects - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Embryonic and Fetal Development - drug effects
Epilepsy - drug therapy
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - drug therapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To investigate the influence of maternal antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment on pregnancy duration, birth weight, body length, head circumference, and intrauterine growth in infants exposed in utero to antiepileptic drugs in Sweden between 1973-1997, with 963 singleton infants. METHODS: Data collected from (a) 1973-1981 (record linkage between a hospital discharge register and a medical birth register); (b) 1984-1995 (prospectively collected information in one defined catchment area with two delivery hospitals); and (c) 1995-1997 (medical birth register data). Observed numbers of infants below a defined size for body measurements compared with expected numbers calculated from all births in Sweden after stratification for year of birth, maternal age, parity, and education or smoking habits in early pregnancy. Standard deviation scores estimated with same stratification procedures. RESULTS: Fraction of monotherapy exposures increased from approximately 40% to approximately 90% from 1973 to 1997. Significantly increased numbers of infants with small body measurements found in exposed group. Negative influence on body dimensions decreased over time. More marked effects found in infants exposed to polytherapy. In monotherapy, only infants exposed to carbamazepine consistently showed reduction in body dimensions. Significant effect on gestational age in girls and on number of small for gestational age (
PubMed ID
10897157 View in PubMed
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Cancer in pregnancy: Motherisk on-line question and answer forum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160346
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Nov;53(11):1891-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Sandy Grupp
Adrienne Einarson
Gideon Koren
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Nov;53(11):1891-2
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Canada
Family Practice - methods
Female
Fetal Development - drug effects
Gestational Age
Humans
Maternal Health Services - methods
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic - diagnosis - drug therapy
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Diagnosis
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Women's health
Abstract
It seems to me that cancer is occurring or being diagnosed more frequently among young women who are or might become pregnant. In the past year, I have seen several such women in my practice and I have had difficulty finding appropriate information in order to counsel them. Is there somewhere I can go for information about cancer during pregnancy so that I can better educate and inform these patients?
The Motherisk Program at the Hospital for Sick Children supports an on-line Cancer in Pregnancy Forum where physicians and other health care professionals can submit questions or details of experiences that they have had with patients who had cancer during pregnancy. Questions about the safety of chemotherapeutic drugs before and during pregnancy and about possible exacerbation of previous cancer by pregnancy are most common.
Notes
Cites: Hum Reprod Update. 2001 Jul-Aug;7(4):384-9311476351
Cites: Clin Lymphoma. 2001 Dec;2(3):173-711779294
Cites: Cancer. 2006 Sep 15;107(6):1219-2616894524
Cites: Am J Hematol. 1991 Apr;36(4):243-81707227
Cites: Med Pediatr Oncol. 1988;16(1):3-63340063
PubMed ID
18000262 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Sep 6;161(36):5024-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-6-1999
Author
J. Balle
M J Olofsson
J. Hilden
Author Affiliation
H:S Hvidovre Hospital, familieambulatoriet.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Sep 6;161(36):5024-8
Date
Sep-6-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Denmark
Embryonic and Fetal Development - drug effects
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Marijuana Abuse - complications
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - psychology
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In two Copenhagen University hospitals 12,885 pregnant women, seen during the period 1.8.1992 to 30.04.1995, answered questionnaires regarding consumption of alcohol, tobacco, cannabis and other drugs. The prevalence of cannabis use was 0.8%. Women using cannabis but no other illicit drugs were each retrospectively matched with four randomly chosen pregnant women in the same period and the same age group and with same parity. Eighty-four cannabis users were included. These women were socioeconomically disadvantaged and had a higher prevalence of present and past use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. No significant difference in pregnancy, delivery or puerperal outcome was found. Children of women using cannabis were 150 g lighter, 1.2 cm shorter and had 0.2 cm smaller head circumference than the control infants. Controlling for the child's sex and maternal use of alcohol did not eliminate the significant differences in birthweight and length; however, they were eliminated by controlling for maternal tobacco smoking. It is concluded, that the use of cannabis is not a major prognostic factor regarding the outcome of pregnancy, but is an indicator of low socioeconomic status and use of other substances.
PubMed ID
10489797 View in PubMed
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Children are different: environmental contaminants and children's health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205210
Source
Can J Public Health. 1998 May-Jun;89 Suppl 1:S9-13, S10-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
G W Chance
E. Harmsen
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, Canadian Institute of Child Health, Ottawa. cich@igs.net
Source
Can J Public Health. 1998 May-Jun;89 Suppl 1:S9-13, S10-5
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Behavior - drug effects
Child Development - drug effects
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Embryonic and Fetal Development - drug effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental health
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Abstract
Although the impact of environmental contaminants on human health has been widely studied, few reports in the Canadian literature have focussed on the specific vulnerability of children. Because of their rapid growth, physiologic and metabolic immaturity, the fetus and child are often at increased risk from toxic substances in their environments. Furthermore, greater air, food and fluid intakes relative to body weight compared with the adult, increase the child's potential for excessive exposures. The crawling stage of infancy, the play patterns and short stature of toddlers also serve to increase their exposure to dust and heavy and volatile substances which accumulate near the floor. This article provides an overview of some of the developmental physiologic, anatomic and behavioural features of the fetus, infant and child which increase their vulnerability to environmental contaminants in comparison with adults. Specific examples are given.
PubMed ID
9654786 View in PubMed
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[Congenital malformations and fetal growth of children with intrauterine exposure to anticonvulsants]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31857
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Nov 5;163(45):6279-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-5-2001
Author
K M Fonager
H. Larsen
L. Pedersen
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Aarhus Universitet, Institut for Epidemiologi og Socialmedicin, Center for Epidemiologisk Grundforskning.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Nov 5;163(45):6279-83
Date
Nov-5-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - etiology
Adult
Anticonvulsants - adverse effects
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Embryonic and Fetal Development - drug effects
English Abstract
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - chemically induced
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Pregnancy
Prescriptions, Drug
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine the risk of malformations and fetal growth in the children of women treated with anticonvulsant drugs in North Jutland County, Denmark. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All women treated with anticonvulsant drugs in the county were identified in a Pharmaco-Epidemiological Prescription Database and linked to the Danish Medical Birth Registry and the Regional Hospital Information system. RESULTS: We identified 235 pregnancies where the mothers had used prescriptions for anticonvulsants around conception and/or during pregnancy, and 17,259 unexposed pregnancies where the mothers had not used prescriptions. One case of neural tube defect was found among 15 malformations in the exposed cohort. The overall odds ratio for malformations was 2.2 (95% confidence intervals 1.3-3.8). The odds ratios for low birth weight and preterm delivery were respectively 1.5 (95% confidence intervals 0.6-3.7) and 1.6 (95% confidence intervals 1.0-2.5). CONCLUSION: We found an increased risk of congenital malformations and a tendency to growth retardation in the children of women taking anticonvulsants.
PubMed ID
11723688 View in PubMed
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Developmental origins of environmentally induced disease and dysfunction International Conference on Foetal Programming and Developmental Toxicity, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands, 20-24 May, 2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87496
Source
Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2008 Feb;102(2):71-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008

Developmental origins of environmentally induced disease and dysfunction. Proceedings of the International Conference on Foetal Programming and Developmental Toxicity. Tórshavn, Faroe Islands. May, 20-24, 2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87477
Source
Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2008 Feb;102(2):71-273
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Feb-2008

47 records – page 1 of 5.