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310 records – page 1 of 31.

Abnormal adherence junctions in the heart and reduced angiogenesis in transgenic mice overexpressing mutant type XIII collagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53860
Source
EMBO J. 2001 Sep 17;20(18):5153-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-17-2001
Author
M. Sund
R. Ylönen
A. Tuomisto
R. Sormunen
J. Tahkola
A P Kvist
S. Kontusaari
H. Autio-Harmainen
T. Pihlajaniemi
Author Affiliation
Collagen Research Unit, Biocenter Oulu, Department of Medical Biochemistry, University of Oulu, PL 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
EMBO J. 2001 Sep 17;20(18):5153-64
Date
Sep-17-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adherens Junctions - ultrastructure
Animals
Collagen - genetics - metabolism - physiology
Embryonic and Fetal Development
Fetus - abnormalities - blood supply
Heart - embryology
Heart Defects, Congenital - pathology
Mice
Mice, Transgenic
Mutation
Myocardium - ultrastructure
Neovascularization, Physiologic
Phenotype
Placenta - abnormalities - blood supply
RNA, Messenger - biosynthesis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Type XIII collagen is a type II transmembrane protein found at sites of cell adhesion. Transgenic mouse lines were generated by microinjection of a DNA construct directing the synthesis of truncated alpha1(XIII) chains. Shortened alpha 1(XIII) chains were synthesized by fibroblasts from mutant mice, and the lack of intracellular accumulation in immunofluorescent staining of tissues suggested that the mutant molecules were expressed on the cell surface. Transgene expression led to fetal lethality in offspring from heterozygous mating with two distinct phenotypes. The early phenotype fetuses were aborted by day 10.5 of development due to a lack of fusion of the chorionic and allantoic membranes. The late phenotype fetuses were aborted by day 13.5 of development and displayed a weak heartbeat, defects of the adherence junctions in the heart with detachment of myofilaments and abnormal staining for the adherence junction component cadherin. Decreased microvessel formation was observed in certain regions of the fetus and the placenta. These results indicate that type XIII collagen has an important role in certain adhesive interactions that are necessary for normal development.
PubMed ID
11566879 View in PubMed
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Accuracy in estimating fetal urinary bladder volume using a modified ultrasound technique.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63687
Source
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2002 Apr;19(4):371-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
M. Fägerquist
U. Fägerquist
H. Steyskal
A. Odén
S G Blomberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, North Elfsborg County Hospital, Trollhättan, Sweden. mats.fagerquist@vgregion.se
Source
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2002 Apr;19(4):371-9
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bladder - embryology - ultrasonography
Comparative Study
Computer simulation
Embryonic and Fetal Development
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Ultrasonography, Prenatal - methods
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Fetal urine production at different gestational ages has been evaluated using ultrasound in several previous studies. In a recent study, we investigated the accuracy when estimating the bladder volume using the conventional ultrasound technique and found a total variability of 17.3-10.9% for bladder volumes of 5-40 mL. The variability is mainly caused by: (i) inappropriate image selection (the 'freezing error') and (ii) limitations when measuring on the frozen image (the 'frozen error'). The aim of this study was to reduce the total error by reducing the 'freezing' and the 'frozen error'. To this end, we used a modified manual ultrasound technique (adding a 'rocking' motion to the conventional method) and digitized the selected image. METHODS: Two patients for each gestational week from 24 to 40 weeks were selected. The fetal urinary bladder was examined with ultrasound three times within 1 min and documented on videotape. The volume, as assessed by the longitudinal section of the recorded bladder images, stored in digitized form, was evaluated on three occasions with > 24 h in between. The mean and variability (standard deviation, SD) were estimated. RESULTS: For fetal bladder volumes between 5 and 40 mL, the 'freezing error' (SD), the 'frozen error' and the 'total error' were 11.7-5.1%, 8.0-3.0% and 14.2-5.9%, respectively. Comparing the present with a previous study, when selecting images and assessing bladder volumes repeatedly within 1 min, SD was 12.9-5.5% vs. 17.3-10.9%. CONCLUSIONS: Using a modified ultrasound technique, the variability in fetal bladder volume estimation can be reduced.
PubMed ID
11952967 View in PubMed
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Adult major affective disorder after prenatal exposure to an influenza epidemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208905
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1997 Apr;54(4):322-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
R A Machón
S A Mednick
M O Huttunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, Calif., USA.
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1997 Apr;54(4):322-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Brain - embryology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Embryonic and Fetal Development - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Abstract
We have previously reported an increase in schizophrenia diagnoses in a population exposed during the second trimester to the 1957 influenza epidemic. These basic findings together with a fair number of replications have been interpreted as supporting a neurodevelopmental contribution to the origins of schizophrenia. Recent neuroimaging findings suggest that affective illness may also have a neurodevelopmental origin. We examined the hypothesis that exposure to an influenza epidemic during the second trimester would increase the risk for adult major affective disorder.
The subjects had been exposed as fetuses to the type A2/Singapore influenza epidemic in greater Helsinki, Finland. Control subjects were born in the 6 years before the epidemic.
We found a significant (P .05) were similar. The second-trimester effect remained when we estimated population-based rates (2.1 vs 0.6 per 1000) (P .05) elevation was observed for the bipolar forms of major affective disorder.
These data are consistent with the hypothesis concerning the possible neurodevelopmental contribution to the origins of some forms of major affective disorder, especially unipolar depressive disorder. These encouraging findings, if replicated, may suggest that some mental disorders may stem, in part, from a disturbance in the development of the fetal brain during the second trimester.
PubMed ID
9107148 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and time to recognition of pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168892
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2006 Nov;10(6):467-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Erika M Edwards
Martha M Werler
Author Affiliation
Data Coordinating Center, Boston University School of Public Health, 715 Albany St, 580, Boston, MA 02118, USA. eedwards@bu.edu
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2006 Nov;10(6):467-72
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Awareness
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Fetal Development - drug effects
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Menstrual Cycle - drug effects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unplanned
Pregnant Women - psychology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Risk-Taking
Time Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Despite warnings to abstain from alcohol, American women who are or could become pregnant still drink. This study evaluates whether women who consume alcohol are at an increased risk of recognizing pregnancy later than women who do not, adjusting for confounding factors that have been associated with alcohol consumption during pregnancy.
The sample included 863 control women from a multisite case-control study conducted from 1996 to 2002 in the United States and Canada. Telephone interviews were conducted with mothers by trained nurse interviewers who administered standardized questionnaires on demographic and reproductive factors, and pregnancy exposures.
Alcohol consumption was classified as none (42.0%), occasional (31.9%), regular (15.6%), and heavy (10.5%). Time to recognition of pregnancy was calculated as the date pregnancy was suspected minus the last menstrual period date (median: 31 days; range: 7-227 days). Unadjusted Cox proportional hazard models found that regular drinkers, but not heavy drinkers, had a significantly higher risk of recognizing pregnancy later than non-drinkers. However, this association went away after adjustment for demographic factors. Among women with unplanned pregnancies, heavy alcohol intake was associated with a 45% increased hazard ratio, compared to 0.80 for women with planned pregnancies; however, this finding was not statistically significant.
While time to pregnancy recognition did not vary among drinkers and non-drinkers, results from this study reiterate previous findings that pregnant women consume alcohol, and that drinkers share social and demographic characteristics that could be used to target public health interventions.
PubMed ID
16763772 View in PubMed
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Ambient temperature during gestation and cold-related adult mortality in a Swedish cohort, 1915-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265273
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Oct;119:191-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Tim A Bruckner
Gerard J van den Berg
Kirk R Smith
Ralph A Catalano
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Oct;119:191-7
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Cold Temperature
Fetal Development
Gestational Age
Humans
Hypothermia - complications
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Seasons
Stroke - etiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
For all climatic regions, mortality due to cold exceeds mortality due to heat. A separate line of research indicates that season of birth predicts lifespan after age 50. This and other literature implies the hypothesis that ambient temperature during gestation may influence cold-related adult mortality. We use data on over 13,500 Swedes from the Uppsala Birth Cohort Study to test whether cold-related mortality in adulthood varies positively with unusually benign ambient temperature during gestation. We linked daily thermometer temperatures in Uppsala, Sweden (1915-2002) to subjects beginning at their estimated date of conception and ending at death or the end of follow-up. We specified a Cox proportional hazards model with time-dependent covariates to analyze the two leading causes of cold-related death in adulthood: ischemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke. Over 540,450 person-years, 1313 IHD and 406 stroke deaths occurred. For a one standard deviation increase in our measure of warm temperatures during gestation, we observe an increased hazard ratio of 1.16 for cold-related IHD death (95% confidence interval: 1.03-1.29). We, however, observe no relation for cold-related stroke mortality. Additional analyses show that birthweight percentile and/or gestational age do not mediate discovered findings. The IHD results indicate that ambient temperature during gestation--independent of birth month--modifies the relation between cold and adult mortality. We encourage longitudinal studies of the adult sequelae of ambient temperature during gestation among populations not sufficiently sheltered from heat or cold waves.
PubMed ID
24593929 View in PubMed
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An assessment of the developmental, reproductive, and neurotoxicity of endosulfan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89883
Source
Birth Defects Res B Dev Reprod Toxicol. 2009 Feb;86(1):1-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Silva Marilyn H
Gammon Derek
Author Affiliation
Department of Pesticide Regulation, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812, USA. msilva@cdpr.ca.gov
Source
Birth Defects Res B Dev Reprod Toxicol. 2009 Feb;86(1):1-28
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Autistic Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Databases, Factual
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Embryo, Mammalian - embryology
Endocrine Disruptors - classification - toxicity
Endosulfan - classification - toxicity
Female
Fetal Development - drug effects
Humans
Infertility, Male - epidemiology - etiology
Inhalation Exposure
Insecticides - classification - toxicity
Male
Nervous System Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level
Pesticide Residues - toxicity
Pregnancy
Rabbits
Rats
Reproduction - drug effects
Risk assessment
Spermatozoa - drug effects
Teratogens - classification - toxicity
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Endosulfan has been used for over 50 years. Although most analogs have been discontinued, endosulfan has less environmental persistence. Nevertheless, pressure groups are lobbying for a worldwide ban. The reasons are: possible rodent male reproductive toxicity, other endocrine effects and cancer; human epidemiology, and exposure studies; residues appearing in remote areas of the world, e.g., the Arctic. METHODS: The endosulfan toxicology database is described and risks of its use assessed. RESULTS: Endosulfan is an antagonist at the GABA(A) receptor Cl(-) ionophore in mammalian CNS. Rat acute toxicity is moderate, LD(50)=48 (M) or 10 mg/kg/d (F), oral gavage; 130 (M), 70 mg/kg/d (F) dermal; LC(50)=34.5 microg/L (M), 12.6 microg/L (F), inhalation. Critical NOELs for risk assessment: acute oral (gavage)=0.7 mg/kg/d (rabbit developmental); Subchronic oral (diet)=1.2 mg/kg/d (rat reproduction); Chronic oral (diet)=0.6 mg/kg/d. There were no acceptable dermal toxicity studies. The critical acute and subchronic inhalation NOELs=0.001 mg/L, chronic inhalation=0.0001 mg/L (estimated). Toxicity to rat sperm occurred at doses causing neurotoxicity. Endocrine effects, resulting from P450 oxygenase(s) induction, were reversible. Increased cancer, genotoxicity, or histopathology in rodents was not observed in any organ. Possible effects on brain biogenic amine levels were probably secondary. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiology and rodent studies suggesting autism and male reproductive toxicity are open to other interpretations. Developmental/ reproductive toxicity or endocrine disruption occurs only at doses causing neurotoxicity. Toxicity to the fetus or young animals is not more severe than that shown by adults.
PubMed ID
19243027 View in PubMed
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310 records – page 1 of 31.