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347 records – page 1 of 35.

Abdominal wall defects in Denmark, 1970-89.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31708
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2002 Jan;16(1):73-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
M. Bugge
N V Holm
Author Affiliation
Wilhelm Johannsen Centre for Functional Genome Research, Department of Medical Genetics, Institute of Biochemistry and Genetics, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. MB@IMBG.ku.dk
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2002 Jan;16(1):73-81
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Muscles - abnormalities
Birth Certificates
Cohort Studies
Death Certificates
Denmark - epidemiology
Fetal Death - epidemiology - etiology
Gastroschisis - classification - epidemiology
Hernia, Umbilical - classification - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Prevalence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In the last two to three decades, increasing rates of gastroschisis but not of omphalocele have been reported from different parts of the world. The present study represents a register containing 469 children born with abdominal wall defects based on data retrieved from 20 birth cohorts (1970-89) in three nationwide registries. A tentative estimate of the completeness as regards identification of liveborn and stillborn infants is a minimum of 95% and 90% respectively. All cases were reclassified to 166 cases of gastroschisis, 258 of omphalocele and 16 of gross abdominal wall defect. The average point prevalence at birth of gastroschisis was 1.33 per 10 000 live and stillbirths. During the first decade, an increase in prevalence occurred culminating in 1976, followed by a decrease reaching its initial value in 1983 and then a new increase. Overall, no significant linear trend could be demonstrated for the entire period. The average point prevalence at birth for omphalocele was 2.07 and for gross abdominal wall defect 0.12 per 10 000 live and stillbirths with no significant change in the period. The geographical distribution of gastroschisis and omphalocele showed no difference per county.
PubMed ID
11856457 View in PubMed
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Absolute vs relative improvements in congenital diaphragmatic hernia survival: what happened to "hidden mortality".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151056
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2009 May;44(5):877-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
V Kandice Mah
Mohammed Zamakhshary
Doug Y Mah
Brian Cameron
Juan Bass
Desmond Bohn
Leslie Scott
Sharifa Himidan
Mark Walker
Peter C W Kim
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2009 May;44(5):877-82
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Death Certificates
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Fetal Diseases - surgery
Hernia, Diaphragmatic - congenital - embryology - mortality - surgery
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Selection Bias
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The aim of this study is to determine if there has been a true, absolute, or apparent relative increase in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) survival for the last 2 decades.
All neonatal Bochdalek CDH patients admitted to an Ontario pediatric surgical hospital during the period when significant improvements in CDH survival was reported (from January 1, 1992, to December 31, 1999) were analyzed. Patient characteristics were assessed for CDH population homogeneity and differences between institutional and vital statistics-based population survival outcomes. SAS 9.1 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC) was used for analysis.
Of 198 cohorts, demographic parameters including birth weight, gestational age, Apgar scores, sex, and associated congenital anomalies did not change significantly. Preoperative survival was 149 (75.2%) of 198, whereas postoperative survival was 133 (89.3%) of 149, and overall institutional survival was 133 (67.2%) of 198. Comparison of institution and population-based mortality (n = 65 vs 96) during the period yielded 32% of CDH deaths unaccounted for by institutions. Yearly analysis of hidden mortality consistently showed a significantly lower mortality in institution-based reporting than population.
A hidden mortality exists for institutionally reported CDH survival rates. Careful interpretation of research findings and more comprehensive population-based tools are needed for reliable counseling and evaluation of current and future treatments.
PubMed ID
19433161 View in PubMed
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Advances in perinatal care and declining regional neonatal mortality in Finland, 1968-82.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237049
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1986 May;75(3):362-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1986
Author
A. Tenovuo
P. Kero
P. Piekkala
M. Sillanpää
R. Erkkola
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1986 May;75(3):362-9
Date
May-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asphyxia Neonatorum - mortality
Bacterial Infections - mortality
Birth weight
Cerebral Hemorrhage - mortality
Child Welfare
Congenital Abnormalities - mortality
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Finland
Humans
Infant care
Infant mortality
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - mortality
Virus Diseases - mortality
Abstract
Neonatal mortality (NNM) was investigated in the region of the University Central Hospital of Turku (UCHT), Finland, during a 15-year period from 1968 till 1982. During the study period 81 620 liveborn infants were born. The NNM rate declined from 13.5 in 1968 to 3.0 in 1982 during the study period. Significant declines occurred in NNM due to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and asphyxia. The decline in NNM was more obvious during the early neonatal period (0-6 days after birth) and in the low birth weight (LBW) group (BW less than 2500 g). We believe that centralization of obstetric and neonatal services in risk cases and the new neonatal intensive care accounted for the decline in NNM.
PubMed ID
3727999 View in PubMed
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Amenorrhea, intrauterine mortality and parental consanguinity in an isolated French Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253210
Source
Hum Biol. 1974 Sep;46(3):405-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1974

Amniotic fluid embolism in Sweden, 1951-1980.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65619
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 1985;20(3):130-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
U. Högberg
I. Joelsson
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 1985;20(3):130-7
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Embolism, Amniotic Fluid - etiology - mortality
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Humans
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Amniotic fluid embolism is one of the least frequent complications of parturition, but the most dangerous of all. 38 cases of fatal amniotic fluid embolism were diagnosed in Sweden during the years 1951-1980, i.e. 1 case for every 83,000 live births. The proportion of amniotic fluid embolism in maternal mortality as a whole increased from 1.2 to 16.5% during this period. Predisposing factors identified were gemini/polydyramnios, abruptio placentae, hypertonic labor, rupture of the birth canal, macrosomia, and obstetrical interventions such as administration of oxytocin and fundal pressure. The main symptoms were cardiovascular shock with right heart strain, and hemorrhage with pathologic proteolysis. Four cases of presumed amniotic fluid embolism with survival of the patient were diagnosed during the years 1972-1980--a case fatality rate of 66% (4/12).
PubMed ID
3841331 View in PubMed
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Analysis of intrapartum fetal deaths: their decline with increasing electronic fetal monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241160
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1984;63(5):459-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
R. Erkkola
M. Grönroos
R. Punnonen
P. Kilkku
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1984;63(5):459-62
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Weight
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Fetal Heart - physiopathology
Fetal Monitoring
Finland
Heart rate
Humans
Labor, Obstetric
Pregnancy
Abstract
Over a 12-year period, from 1970 to 1981, 30 600 babies were born at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Central Hospital, Turku, Finland. During that period, the use of electronic fetal monitoring increased remarkably, being involved in 9, 12, 33 and 95% of all vaginal deliveries during four consecutive 3-year periods. The number of intrapartum deaths during the same 12-year period was 52, giving an overall rate of 1.7 per thousand. When 15 lethally malformed infants are excluded, the rate becomes 1.2 per thousand. In the four consecutive 3-year periods, the death rates were 1.7, 1.9, 1.0 and 0.3 per thousand. Electronic fetal monitoring was not undertaken in any of the cases leading to fetal death. The main factor leading to fetal death could be considered to be hypoxia in approximately 90% of the deaths of normally formed babies. The most common reasons for hypoxia were placental abruption and cord entanglement, yet in many cases only the decreased placental perfusion could be suggested to have caused the hypoxia. The mean weight of those babies that died intrapartally decreased significantly, being approximately 1 250 g during the last 3-year period.
PubMed ID
6496047 View in PubMed
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Analysis of malpractice claims with a focus on oxytocin use in labour.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78439
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(3):315-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Jonsson Maria
Nordén Solveig Lindeberg
Hanson Ulf
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. maria.jonsson@akademiska.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(3):315-9
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Fetal Distress - epidemiology
Fetal Monitoring
Humans
Hypoxia, Brain - epidemiology
Labor, Obstetric
Malpractice - statistics & numerical data
Midwifery - statistics & numerical data
Oxytocics - adverse effects
Oxytocin - adverse effects
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to analyse the motives behind disciplinary action in obstetric malpractice cases concerning delivery, and to evaluate the frequency of inappropriate oxytocin use in these cases. METHODS: An analysis of all malpractice claims resulting in disciplinary action against physicians and midwives during the period 1996-2003. Investigations and decisions made by the Board of Medical Responsibility were reviewed with special focus on the use of oxytocin. RESULTS: Of 77 cases, 60 regarded patients in labour. In the majority, there had been a normal pregnancy and spontaneous start of labour (78%). At the beginning of labour, 87% showed a normal fetal heart rate (FHR) pattern, indicating fetal well-being. In 70%, there was adverse fetal outcome with brain damage or death. The most common reason for disciplinary action was improper interpretation of fetal monitor tracings and corresponding failure to recognise fetal distress (76%). Injudicious use of oxytocin was common (68.5%), and was the primary reason for disciplinary action in 33% of the cases. CONCLUSION: In a Swedish setting, a few common clinical problems pervade; interpretation of FHR patterns and the use of oxytocin account for the majority of rulings of negligence in malpractice cases regarding delivery. Analysis of the cases suggests that the adverse fetal outcomes could possibly have been prevented.
PubMed ID
17364306 View in PubMed
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Analysis of perinatal mortality rate in the Stockholm area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60684
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1979;275:35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
A. Ericson
M. Eriksson
R. Zetterström
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1979;275:35-40
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Catchment Area (Health)
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Gestational Age
Hospitals, Maternity
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Parity
Pregnancy
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Urban health
Abstract
During the period 1973--1976, a significant decrease in perinatal mortality from 14.2 to 10.4/10 newborns occurred in Sweden. In the Stockholm area, the mean perinatal mortality during the same period varied significantly between the different maternity hospitals, even when pre-term and high risk pregnancies were excluded from the comparison. The majority of hospitals with fewer deliveries and without pediatric wards had a perinatal mortality above the mean. Some explanations of these differences were also looked for in differences between the total population of the referral area of each maternity hospital. In the referral areas of the hospitals with a perinatal mortality above the mean, there were higher percentages of low-income households and over-crowded dwellings and fewer professional people than in the other area. The results suggest a need for analysis of individually-based data to find etiological factors which account for differences in perinatal mortality.
PubMed ID
291287 View in PubMed
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Anencephalus and drinking water composition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249965
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1977 May;105(5):460-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1977
Author
J M Elwood
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1977 May;105(5):460-8
Date
May-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anencephaly - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Calcium - analysis
Canada
Congenital Abnormalities - mortality
Drinking
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Fresh Water - analysis
Humans
Hydrocephalus - mortality
Lithium - analysis
Magnesium - analysis
Pregnancy
Spinal Dysraphism - mortality
Water - analysis
Water Softening
Water supply
Abstract
The mortality rate (stillbirths and infant deaths) from anencephalus from 1950-1969 in 36 cities of over 50,000 population in Canada showed a negative association (r = -.39) with the concentration of magnesium in water sampled at domestic taps. The mortality rates showed negative associations with mean income and longitude, and a multiple regression model using the three factors showed significant effects of each and accounted for 69% of the intercity variation in rates. There were no significant associations seen with water calcium concentration or total hardness. Income, magnesium and longitude were also negatively associated with mortality rates from spina bifida, hydrocephalus, other congenital abnormalities, and total stillbirth and infant death rates, but the association with magnesium was significant only for total stillbirths. The negative association of anencephalus mortality and magnesium levels was also seen in a sample of 14 smaller towns in Ontario.
PubMed ID
324271 View in PubMed
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An epidemic of parvovirus B19 in a population of 3,596 pregnant women: a study of sociodemographic and medical risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32777
Source
BJOG. 2000 May;107(5):637-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
I P Jensen
P. Thorsen
B. Jeune
B R Møller
B F Vestergaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, States Serum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
BJOG. 2000 May;107(5):637-43
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Parvoviridae Infections - epidemiology
Parvovirus B19, Human - isolation & purification
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To estimate the incidence of human parvovirus B19 among pregnant women before and during an epidemic, to elucidate possible sociodemographic and medical risk factors during pregnancy and to estimate the association between parvovirus B19 infection and negative pregnancy outcome. DESIGN: Prospective study among pregnant women followed from their first antenatal visit before 24 full weeks of gestation until delivery. SETTING: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark, November 1992 to February 1994. METHODS: 3,596 pregnant women were invited to participate. The women were examined at first antenatal visit in the period from November 1992 to February 1994 and at delivery. The last delivery was in August 1994 and samples were thus collected before and during a large parvovirus B19 epidemic in Denmark January to September 1994. A blood sample for parvovirus B19 serology was taken at enrollment and from the umbilical cord at delivery. Three questionnaires were completed during 2nd and 3rd trimesters and a registration form at delivery. In total, 3,174 (87.6%) were enrolled and 79.5% completed the study. RESULTS: The prevalence of B19 IgG seropositivity at the first antenatal visit before 24 full weeks of gestation was 66% . The cumulative prevalence proportion of acute parvovirus B19 infection during pregnancy among IgG negative women was found to be 10.3% (IgM seropositivity and/or IgG seroconversion). The IgG seroconversion incidence increased significantly from 1.0% to 13.5% among 932 seronegative pregnant women before and during the epidemic, respectively (P
PubMed ID
10826579 View in PubMed
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347 records – page 1 of 35.