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Abdominal wall defects in Denmark, 1970-89.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31708
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2002 Jan;16(1):73-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
M. Bugge
N V Holm
Author Affiliation
Wilhelm Johannsen Centre for Functional Genome Research, Department of Medical Genetics, Institute of Biochemistry and Genetics, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. MB@IMBG.ku.dk
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2002 Jan;16(1):73-81
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Muscles - abnormalities
Birth Certificates
Cohort Studies
Death Certificates
Denmark - epidemiology
Fetal Death - epidemiology - etiology
Gastroschisis - classification - epidemiology
Hernia, Umbilical - classification - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Prevalence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In the last two to three decades, increasing rates of gastroschisis but not of omphalocele have been reported from different parts of the world. The present study represents a register containing 469 children born with abdominal wall defects based on data retrieved from 20 birth cohorts (1970-89) in three nationwide registries. A tentative estimate of the completeness as regards identification of liveborn and stillborn infants is a minimum of 95% and 90% respectively. All cases were reclassified to 166 cases of gastroschisis, 258 of omphalocele and 16 of gross abdominal wall defect. The average point prevalence at birth of gastroschisis was 1.33 per 10 000 live and stillbirths. During the first decade, an increase in prevalence occurred culminating in 1976, followed by a decrease reaching its initial value in 1983 and then a new increase. Overall, no significant linear trend could be demonstrated for the entire period. The average point prevalence at birth for omphalocele was 2.07 and for gross abdominal wall defect 0.12 per 10 000 live and stillbirths with no significant change in the period. The geographical distribution of gastroschisis and omphalocele showed no difference per county.
PubMed ID
11856457 View in PubMed
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Source
Dan Medicinhist Arbog. 2015;43:101-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sven Erik Hansen
Source
Dan Medicinhist Arbog. 2015;43:101-8
Date
2015
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Fatal Outcome
Female
Fetal Death - etiology
History, 19th Century
Humans
Medical Illustration - history
Obstetrics - history
Osteomyelitis - complications - history - pathology
Parturition
Periodicals as Topic
Pregnancy
Abstract
A birth with fatal outcome for both the mother and the foetus was reported in the Danish medical journal, Bibliothek for Læger in 1868. Here, the article with its two illustrations is summarised because of the vivid description of the course together with the therapeutic considerations expressed by the obstetrician. Due to an earlier osteomyelitis the pregnant woman's spine was deformed and her pelvis was narrowed. The birth came to a standstill, and it became necessary to reduce the circumference of the foetus' cranium by perforation, after which the dead foetus could be delivered. The woman died of infection some days later. Afterwards her deformed lumbar spine and pelvis was removed, preserved and depicted in two lithographs. The preserved pelvis is still extant in the Saxtorphian obstetric collection in Medical Museion, Copenhagen.
PubMed ID
27086448 View in PubMed
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Abortion and calf mortality in Danish cattle herds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64883
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 1993;34(4):371-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
J S Agerholm
A. Basse
H V Krogh
K. Christensen
L. Rønsholt
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology and Epidemiology, National Veterinary Laboratory, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 1993;34(4):371-7
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Veterinary - etiology
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - etiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Death - veterinary
Infection - mortality - veterinary
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The aetiology of abortions and calf mortality in 65 Danish cattle herds consisting of both dairy and beef breeds during a 1-year period is described. All observed aborted foetuses, still-born calves, and calves dying before 6 months of age were necropsied, and relevant microbiological examinations were performed. A total of 240 calves and 66 abortions were submitted corresponding to a calf mortality rate of 7%. The abortion frequency could not be calculated. 43% of the calves died at day 0, while 22% were aborted, 15% died during the first week of life, 9% died from 1 to 4 weeks of age, and 11% died at the age of 1 to 6 months. The most common cause was neonatal pulmonic atelectasis (stillbirth) followed by foetal infections, pneumonia, and septicaemia.
PubMed ID
8147289 View in PubMed
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Absence of human bocavirus from deceased fetuses and their mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146525
Source
J Clin Virol. 2010 Feb;47(2):186-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Anita Riipinen
Elina Väisänen
Anne Lahtinen
Riitta Karikoski
Mika Nuutila
Heljä-Marja Surcel
Helena Taskinen
Klaus Hedman
Maria Söderlund-Venermo
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FIN-00250 Helsinki, Finland. anita.riipinen@ttl.fi
Source
J Clin Virol. 2010 Feb;47(2):186-8
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - etiology
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Female
Fetal Death - etiology
Fetus - virology
Finland - epidemiology
Heart - virology
Human bocavirus - isolation & purification
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Liver - virology
Middle Aged
Parvoviridae Infections - epidemiology - virology
Placenta - virology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - virology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
The human bocavirus (HBoV), a newly discovered parvovirus, is closely related to the bovine parvovirus and the canine minute virus, which are known to cause adverse pregnancy outcomes. Another human parvovirus, B19, can lead to fetal hydrops, miscarriage and intrauterine fetal death (IUFD).
To determine the prevalence of HBoV DNA in aborted fetuses and IUFDs. The HBoV serology of the mothers was also studied.
We retrospectively studied all available fetuses (N=535) autopsied during 7/1992-12/1995, and 1/2003-12/2005 in Helsinki, Finland. All available formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded fetal tissues - placenta, heart and liver - of 120 miscarriages, 169 IUFDs, and 246 induced abortions were studied by quantitative PCR. We also measured the HBoV IgM and IgG antibodies in the corresponding maternal sera (N=462) mostly of the first trimester. The IgM-positive sera underwent HBoV PCR.
None of the fetal tissues harbored HBoV DNA. A total of 97% (448/462) of the mothers were positive for IgG antibodies to HBoV, while only 0.9% (4/462) exhibited HBoV-specific IgM antibodies without viremia or respiratory symptoms. One IgM-positive mother had an unexplained fetal loss.
We did not find HBoV DNA in any of the deceased fetuses. Almost all pregnant women were HBoV-IgG positive.
PubMed ID
20031484 View in PubMed
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Absolute vs relative improvements in congenital diaphragmatic hernia survival: what happened to "hidden mortality".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151056
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2009 May;44(5):877-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
V Kandice Mah
Mohammed Zamakhshary
Doug Y Mah
Brian Cameron
Juan Bass
Desmond Bohn
Leslie Scott
Sharifa Himidan
Mark Walker
Peter C W Kim
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2009 May;44(5):877-82
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Death Certificates
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Fetal Diseases - surgery
Hernia, Diaphragmatic - congenital - embryology - mortality - surgery
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Selection Bias
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The aim of this study is to determine if there has been a true, absolute, or apparent relative increase in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) survival for the last 2 decades.
All neonatal Bochdalek CDH patients admitted to an Ontario pediatric surgical hospital during the period when significant improvements in CDH survival was reported (from January 1, 1992, to December 31, 1999) were analyzed. Patient characteristics were assessed for CDH population homogeneity and differences between institutional and vital statistics-based population survival outcomes. SAS 9.1 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC) was used for analysis.
Of 198 cohorts, demographic parameters including birth weight, gestational age, Apgar scores, sex, and associated congenital anomalies did not change significantly. Preoperative survival was 149 (75.2%) of 198, whereas postoperative survival was 133 (89.3%) of 149, and overall institutional survival was 133 (67.2%) of 198. Comparison of institution and population-based mortality (n = 65 vs 96) during the period yielded 32% of CDH deaths unaccounted for by institutions. Yearly analysis of hidden mortality consistently showed a significantly lower mortality in institution-based reporting than population.
A hidden mortality exists for institutionally reported CDH survival rates. Careful interpretation of research findings and more comprehensive population-based tools are needed for reliable counseling and evaluation of current and future treatments.
PubMed ID
19433161 View in PubMed
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[Adrenal structure in the fetuses of humans living in the European North]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59506
Source
Morfologiia. 1993 May-Jun;104(5-6):77-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
S G Sukhanov
N R Bunchak
Source
Morfologiia. 1993 May-Jun;104(5-6):77-83
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Glands - embryology - metabolism - ultrastructure
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Fetal Death - embryology
Fetus
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Nuclear Proteins - metabolism
Organ Size
Russia
Abstract
The adrenals of 194 human fetuses of 17-40 weeks and newborn infants were studied by histological and morphometrical methods. The abortive material was taken at hospitals in the city of Arkhangelsk and regions beyond the Polar circle. The mass of adrenals was found to be reliably less as compared with the norms in middle latitudes, and the rate of increase of this index decreased in the dynamics of pregnancy. The microscopic and stereometric investigations have revealed decreased thickness of the cortex, adaptational and pathological changes of adrenocorticocytes. Little mass of the adrenals was associated in some cases with a premature formation of the cortex zones.
PubMed ID
8012542 View in PubMed
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Advanced paternal age and risk of fetal death: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63286
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Dec 15;160(12):1214-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2004
Author
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Kasper Daniel Hansen
Per Kragh Andersen
George Davey Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ana@niph.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Dec 15;160(12):1214-22
Date
Dec-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - etiology
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Fetal Death - etiology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Paternal Age
Pregnancy
Reproductive history
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
A possible detrimental paternal age effect on offspring health due to mutations of paternal origin should be reflected in an association between paternal age and fetal loss. The authors used data from a prospective study of 23,821 pregnant women recruited consecutively to the Danish National Birth Cohort from 1997 to 1999 to assess the association between paternal age and fetal death. Fathers of the pregnancies were identified by record linkage to population registers. The paternal age-related risks of fetal death and its components, early and late fetal loss, were estimated using survival analysis. Pregnancies fathered by a man aged 50 or more years (n = 124) had almost twice the risk of ending in a fetal loss compared with pregnancies with younger fathers (hazard ratio = 1.88, 95% confidence interval: 0.93, 3.82), after adjustment for maternal age, reproductive history, and maternal lifestyle during pregnancy. Various approaches to adjustment for potential residual confounding of the relation by maternal age did not affect the relative risk estimates. The paternal age-related risk of late fetal death was higher than the risk of early fetal death and started to increase from the age of 45 years. It should, however, be interpreted cautiously because of the restricted number of fetal deaths.
PubMed ID
15583374 View in PubMed
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Advances in perinatal care and declining regional neonatal mortality in Finland, 1968-82.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237049
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1986 May;75(3):362-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1986
Author
A. Tenovuo
P. Kero
P. Piekkala
M. Sillanpää
R. Erkkola
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1986 May;75(3):362-9
Date
May-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asphyxia Neonatorum - mortality
Bacterial Infections - mortality
Birth weight
Cerebral Hemorrhage - mortality
Child Welfare
Congenital Abnormalities - mortality
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Finland
Humans
Infant care
Infant mortality
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - mortality
Virus Diseases - mortality
Abstract
Neonatal mortality (NNM) was investigated in the region of the University Central Hospital of Turku (UCHT), Finland, during a 15-year period from 1968 till 1982. During the study period 81 620 liveborn infants were born. The NNM rate declined from 13.5 in 1968 to 3.0 in 1982 during the study period. Significant declines occurred in NNM due to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and asphyxia. The decline in NNM was more obvious during the early neonatal period (0-6 days after birth) and in the low birth weight (LBW) group (BW less than 2500 g). We believe that centralization of obstetric and neonatal services in risk cases and the new neonatal intensive care accounted for the decline in NNM.
PubMed ID
3727999 View in PubMed
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815 records – page 1 of 82.