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25-Hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in maternal and cord blood at delivery and in maternal blood during lactation in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240391
Source
Hum Nutr Clin Nutr. 1984 Jul;38(4):261-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1984
Author
C. Lamberg-Allardt
M. Larjosto
E. Schultz
Source
Hum Nutr Clin Nutr. 1984 Jul;38(4):261-8
Date
Jul-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Calcifediol - blood
Calcium - blood
Cholecalciferol - administration & dosage
Female
Fetal Blood - metabolism
Finland
Food Habits
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lactation
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Nutritional Requirements
Pregnancy
Seasons
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood
Abstract
The 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration (25-OHD) in maternal and cord blood of 192 mothers was determined at delivery from June to the end of November. Ninety-nine mothers had received a daily supplementation of 12.5 micrograms of vitamin D during pregnancy and this group had a significantly higher 25-OHD concentration both in maternal and in cord blood than in the corresponding non-supplemented group. A daily supplement of 2.5 micrograms of vitamin D was given to 63 of the mothers during lactation. Of these mothers 44 were still lactating after 6 months. The dietary vitamin D intake of 31 mothers was calculated. We found a significant correlation between the maternal serum 25-OHD concentration 16-18 weeks after delivery and the total vitamin D intake. The intake (5.5 micrograms/d, including supplementation) was lower than that recommended for lactating mothers which is 10 micrograms/d (Food and Nutrition Board, 1980).
PubMed ID
6088438 View in PubMed
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450K epigenome-wide scan identifies differential DNA methylation in newborns related to maternal smoking during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122072
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):1425-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Bonnie R Joubert
Siri E Håberg
Roy M Nilsen
Xuting Wang
Stein E Vollset
Susan K Murphy
Zhiqing Huang
Cathrine Hoyo
Øivind Midttun
Lea A Cupul-Uicab
Per M Ueland
Michael C Wu
Wenche Nystad
Douglas A Bell
Shyamal D Peddada
Stephanie J London
Author Affiliation
Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):1425-31
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors - genetics - metabolism
Biological Markers - blood
Chromatography, Liquid
Cohort Studies
Cotinine - blood
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - genetics - metabolism
DNA Methylation
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Epigenesis, Genetic
Female
Fetal Blood
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Exposure
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - epidemiology - genetics
Repressor Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Transcription Factors - genetics - metabolism
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, due to in utero exposures may play a critical role in early programming for childhood and adult illness. Maternal smoking is a major risk factor for multiple adverse health outcomes in children, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear.
We investigated epigenome-wide methylation in cord blood of newborns in relation to maternal smoking during pregnancy.
We examined maternal plasma cotinine (an objective biomarker of smoking) measured during pregnancy in relation to DNA methylation at 473,844 CpG sites (CpGs) in 1,062 newborn cord blood samples from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (450K).
We found differential DNA methylation at epigenome-wide statistical significance (p-value
Notes
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Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):a40223026408
Erratum In: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Dec;120(12):A455
PubMed ID
22851337 View in PubMed
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[Ability of blood protein, typical of normal growth, to activate glycolysis and inhibit the Pasteur reaction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66133
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1977 Mar-Apr;49(2):78-82
Publication Type
Article
Author
V N Bila
V P Korotkoruchko
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1977 Mar-Apr;49(2):78-82
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Animals
Animals, Newborn - blood
Beta-Globulins - pharmacology
Blood Proteins - pharmacology
English Abstract
Female
Fetal Blood
Glycolysis - drug effects
Immune Sera - pharmacology
Muscles - metabolism
Oxygen
Pregnancy
Rabbits
Abstract
Formation of lactic acid by the extracts from the healthy rabbit muscles was studied as affected by the sera of embryos, newborn rabbits and pregnant female rabbits. The blood sera and beta-globulin isolated from them are established to activate anaerobic glycolysis and inhibit the Pasteur reaction. It is shown that protein typical of normal growth, belonging to beta-globulins and circulating in blood of the embryos, newborn rabbits from the first to the fifteenth day of development is "responsible" for this phenomena. Correlation is found between the precipitation test for detecting this protein and its biological effect on glycolysis and the Pasteur reaction.
PubMed ID
68614 View in PubMed
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[Activation of plasminogen with immobilized trypsin]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65930
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1979 Jul-Aug;51(4):335-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
E V Eretskaia
S A Kudinov
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1979 Jul-Aug;51(4):335-9
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Enzyme Activation
Enzymes, Immobilized - metabolism
Female
Fetal Blood - metabolism
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Kinetics
Placenta
Plasminogen - metabolism
Pregnancy
Temperature
Trypsin - metabolism
Abstract
Human plasminogen isolated from the placenta serum fraction by means of affinity chromatography was activated by trypsin being in covalent bond with sepharose. The activation is studied as dependent on pH, temperature and the proenzyme-activator ratio in the presence of 25% glycerol as a stabilizing agent and without it. Utilization of the immobilized trypsin as a plasminogen activator makes it possible to transform completely the proenzyme to plasmin varying the plasminogen-trypsin ratio and time of activation when it is conducted under optimal conditions: in the presence of 25% glycerol at pH 7.0-7.1 and the temperature of 30 degrees C.
PubMed ID
38546 View in PubMed
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Adoption of diagnostic technology and variation in caesarean section rates: a test of the practice style hypothesis in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124304
Source
Health Serv Res. 2012 Dec;47(6):2169-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Jostein Grytten
Lars Monkerud
Rune Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Section of Community Dentistry, University of Oslo and Akershus University Hospital, Blindern, Oslo, Norway. josteing@odont.uio.no
Source
Health Serv Res. 2012 Dec;47(6):2169-89
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiotocography
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data - trends
Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures - statistics & numerical data
Electrocardiography
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data - trends
Pregnancy
Ultrasonography
Uncertainty
Abstract
To examine whether the introduction of advanced diagnostic technology in maternity care has led to less variation in type of delivery between hospitals in Norway.
The Medical Birth Registry of Norway provided detailed medical information for 1.7 million deliveries from 1967 to 2005. Information about diagnostic technology was collected directly from the maternity units.
The data were analyzed using a two-level binary logistic model with Caesarean section as the outcome measure. Level one contained variables that characterized the health status of the mother and child. Hospitals are level two. A heterogeneous variance structure was specified for the hospital level, where the error variance was allowed to vary according to the following types of diagnostic technology: two-dimensional ultrasound, cardiotocography, ST waveform analysis, and fetal blood analyses.
There was a marked variation in Caesarean section rates between hospitals up to 1973. After this the variation diminished markedly. This was due to the introduction of ultrasound and cardiotocography.
Diagnostic technology reduced clinical uncertainty about the diagnosis of risk factors of the mother and child during delivery, and variation in type of delivery between hospitals was reduced accordingly. The results support the practice style hypothesis.
PubMed ID
22594486 View in PubMed
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Aetiology of congenital hypothyroidism in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231420
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1989 Jan;78(1):67-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1989
Author
M. Virtanen
J. Mäenpää
J. Pikkarainen
L. Pitkänen
J. Perheentupa
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1989 Jan;78(1):67-73
Date
Jan-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Congenital Hypothyroidism
False Positive Reactions
Fetal Blood - analysis
Finland
Humans
Hypothyroidism - epidemiology - etiology
Infant, Newborn
Risk factors
Seasons
Thyrotropin - blood
Abstract
In Finland a nationwide screening programme for congenital hypothyroidism (CHT) has operated since 1980 with complete coverage. Among the total of 307,000 newborns screened, the incidence per 100,000 was 24.6 for thyroid dysgenesis and 4.0 for dyshormonogenesis. We conclude that, when screening is based on cord serum TSH, the false-positive results are caused mainly by difficult delivery. The most important factors associated with dyshormonogenesis were CHT in the family, origin from a geographic risk area, and origin of both mother and father from the same community. These reflect the autosomal recessive inheritance. The risk factors for dysgenesis were female gender, CHT in the family, birth in a geographic risk area, and birth during a risk period of the year.
PubMed ID
2919526 View in PubMed
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The All Our Babies pregnancy cohort: design, methods, and participant characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115873
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13 Suppl 1:S2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sheila W McDonald
Andrew W Lyon
Karen M Benzies
Deborah A McNeil
Stephen J Lye
Siobhan M Dolan
Craig E Pennell
Alan D Bocking
Suzanne C Tough
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. sheilaw.mcdonald@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13 Suppl 1:S2
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Child
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Gene-Environment Interaction
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Pregnancy - blood
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Design
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The prospective cohort study design is ideal for examining diseases of public health importance, as its inherent temporal nature renders it advantageous for studying early life influences on health outcomes and research questions of aetiological significance. This paper will describe the development and characteristics of the All Our Babies (AOB) study, a prospective pregnancy cohort in Calgary, Alberta, Canada designed to examine determinants of maternal, infant, and child outcomes and identify barriers and facilitators in health care utilization.
Women were recruited from health care offices, communities, and through Calgary Laboratory Services before 25 weeks gestation from May 2008 to December 2010. Participants completed two questionnaires during pregnancy, a third at 4 months postpartum, and are currently being followed-up with questionnaires at 12, 24, and 36 months. Data was collected on pregnancy history, demographics, lifestyle, health care utilization, physical and mental health, parenting, and child developmental outcomes and milestones. In addition, biological/serological and genetic markers can be extracted from collected maternal and cord blood samples.
A total of 4011 pregnant women were eligible for recruitment into the AOB study. Of this, 3388 women completed at least one survey. The majority of participants were less than 35 years of age, Caucasian, Canadian born, married or in a common-law relationship, well-educated, and reported household incomes above the Calgary median. Women who discontinued after the first survey (n=123) were typically younger, non-Caucasian, foreign-born, had lower education and household income levels, were less likely to be married or in a common-law relationship, and had poor psychosocial health in early pregnancy. In general, AOB participants reflect the pregnant and parenting population at local and provincial levels, and perinatal indicators from the study are comparable to perinatal surveillance data.
The extensive and rich data collected in the AOB cohort provides the opportunity to answer complex questions about the relationships between biology, early experiences, and developmental outcomes. This cohort will contribute to the understanding of the biologic mechanisms and social/environmental pathways underlying associations between early and later life outcomes, gene-environment interactions, and developmental trajectories among children.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23445747 View in PubMed
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Amniotic fluid erythropoietin and neonatal outcome in pregnancies complicated by intrauterine growth restriction before 34 gestational weeks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261771
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Mar;94(3):288-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Laura Seikku
Leena Rahkonen
Minna Tikkanen
Esa Hämäläinen
Petri Rahkonen
Sture Andersson
Kari Teramo
Jorma Paavonen
Vedran Stefanovic
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Mar;94(3):288-94
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amniotic Fluid - metabolism
Biological Markers - blood
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Erythropoietin - blood
Female
Fetal Blood - metabolism
Fetal Growth Retardation - metabolism
Finland
Humans
Immunoassay
Luminescent Measurements - methods
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Diagnosis - methods
Abstract
High amniotic fluid erythropoietin concentration reflects chronic fetal hypoxia. Our aim was to study amniotic fluid erythropoietin concentration in relation to neonatal outcome in pregnancies complicated by intrauterine growth restriction.
Retrospective case series.
Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
A total of 66 singleton pregnancies complicated by intrauterine growth restriction.
Amniocentesis or amniotic fluid sampling at cesarean section was performed between 24 and 34 gestational weeks. Values of amniotic fluid erythropoietin were quantitated with immunochemiluminometric assay. Normal amniotic fluid erythropoietin was defined as 27 IU/L.
Adverse neonatal outcome.
Abnormal biophysical profile and reversed end-diastolic flow in umbilical artery were associated with abnormal amniotic fluid erythropoietin (p
PubMed ID
25484184 View in PubMed
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Analysis of hemoglobin adducts from acrylamide, glycidamide, and ethylene oxide in paired mother/cord blood samples from Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131736
Source
Chem Res Toxicol. 2011 Nov 21;24(11):1957-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-21-2011
Author
Hans von Stedingk
Anna C Vikström
Per Rydberg
Marie Pedersen
Jeanette K S Nielsen
Dan Segerbäck
Lisbeth E Knudsen
Margareta Törnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Environmental Chemistry Unit, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Chem Res Toxicol. 2011 Nov 21;24(11):1957-65
Date
Nov-21-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - blood
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Chromatography, Liquid
Denmark
Epoxy Compounds - blood
Ethylene Oxide - blood
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Fetus
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Mass Spectrometry
Maternal Exposure
Placenta - physiology
Pregnancy
Smoking - adverse effects - blood
Abstract
The knowledge about fetal exposure to acrylamide/glycidamide from the maternal exposure through food is limited. Acrylamide, glycidamide, and ethylene oxide are electrophiles and form adducts with hemoglobin (Hb), which could be used for in vivo dose measurement. In this study, a method for analysis of Hb adducts by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, the adduct FIRE procedure, was applied to measurements of adducts from these compounds in maternal blood samples (n = 87) and umbilical cord blood samples (n = 219). The adduct levels from the three compounds, acrylamide, glycidamide, and ethylene oxide, were increased in tobacco smokers. Highly significant correlations were found between cord and maternal blood with regard to measured adduct levels of the three compounds. The mean cord/maternal hemoglobin adduct level ratios were 0.48 (range 0.27-0.86) for acrylamide, 0.38 (range 0.20-0.73) for glycidamide, and 0.43 (range 0.17-1.34) for ethylene oxide. In vitro studies with acrylamide and glycidamide showed a lower (0.38-0.48) rate of adduct formation with Hb in cord blood than with Hb in maternal blood, which is compatible with the structural differences in fetal and adult Hb. Together, these results indicate a similar life span of fetal and maternal erythrocytes. The results showed that the in vivo dose in fetal and maternal blood is about the same and that the placenta gives negligible protection of the fetus to exposure from the investigated compounds. A trend of higher levels of the measured adducts in cord blood with gestational age was observed, which may reflect the gestational age-related change of the cord blood Hb composition toward a higher content of adult Hb. The results suggest that the Hb adduct levels measured in cord blood reflect the exposure to the fetus during the third trimester. The evaluation of the new analytical method showed that it is suitable for monitoring of background exposures of the investigated electrophilic compounds in large population studies.
PubMed ID
21882862 View in PubMed
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318 records – page 1 of 32.