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A clinical intervention for children exposed to alcohol in utero.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4424
Source
Alaska Med. 1996 Oct-Dec;38(4):124-31, 147
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Li
K. Pearson
Author Affiliation
Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 1996 Oct-Dec;38(4):124-31, 147
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Mass Screening
Patient care team
Population Surveillance
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study describes a statewide system of delivering special services to children affected by prenatal alcohol exposure and investigates the usefulness of this system as part of a statewide fetal alcohol syndrome surveillance system. The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services administered seven clinics in four of the five largest cities in Alaska during 1992-1995. Among the 74 children selected to be evaluated for fetal alcohol syndrome, 70 had one or more central nervous system abnormalities. Four children were assigned the diagnosis of fetal alcohol syndrome. Recommendations made to parents of the evaluated children included parent support group follow-up (38%), referral to a psychologist (35%), and further school testing and planning (27%). Clinics for alcohol-exposed children provide health officials an opportunity to deliver appropriate services to children exposed to alcohol in utero and to their families. Further studies are necessary to improve the delivery of services to birth mothers of alcohol-exposed children who attend the clinic. State-wide fetal alcohol syndrome surveillance can be accomplished by linking these clinics with other state data sources.
PubMed ID
9124639 View in PubMed
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Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1981 Apr;91(6):204-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1981
Author
P. Løkken
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1981 Apr;91(6):204-6
Date
Apr-1981
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child, Preschool
Female
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
6940100 View in PubMed
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Fetal alcohol syndrome--Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, and New York, 1995-1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4420
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2002 May 24;51(20):433-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-24-2002
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2002 May 24;51(20):433-5
Date
May-24-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Arizona - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Colorado - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
New York - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Abstract
Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is caused by maternal alcohol use during pregnancy and is one of the leading causes of preventable birth defects and developmental disabilities in the United States. FAS is diagnosed on the basis of a combination of growth deficiency (pre- or postnatal), central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction, facial dysmorphology, and maternal alcohol use during pregnancy. Estimates of the prevalence of FAS vary from 0.2 to 1.0 per 1,000 live-born infants. This variation is due, in part, to the small size of the populations studied, varying case definitions, and different surveillance methods. In addition, differences have been noted among racial/ethnic populations. To monitor the occurrence of FAS, CDC collaborated with five states (Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, New York, and Wisconsin*) to develop the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Surveillance Network (FASSNet). This report summarizes the results of an analysis of FASSNet data on children born during 1995-1997, which indicate that FAS rates in Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, and New York ranged from 0.3 to 1.5 per 1,000 live-born infants and were highest for black and American Indian/Alaska Native populations. This study demonstrates that FASSNet is a useful tool that enables health care professionals to monitor the occurrence of FAS and to evaluate the impact of prevention, education, and intervention efforts.
PubMed ID
12056499 View in PubMed
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Fetal alcohol syndrome in Alaska, 1977 through 1992: An administrative prevalence derived from multiple data sources

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4422
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1998 May;88(5):781-786
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
  1 website  
Author
Egeland, GM
Perham-Hester, KA
Gessner, BD
Ingle, D
Berner, JE
Middaugh, JP
Author Affiliation
National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, AK, USA.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1998 May;88(5):781-786
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Population Surveillance - methods
Prevalence
United States
United States Indian Health Service
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The prevalence and characteristics of fetal alcohol syndrome cases and the usefulness of various data sources in surveillance were examined in Alaska to guide prevention and future surveillance efforts. METHODS: Sixteen data sources in Alaska were used to identify children with fetal alcohol syndrome. Medical charts were reviewed to verify cases, and records were reviewed to provide descriptive data. RESULTS: Fetal alcohol syndrome rates varied markedly by birth year and race, with the highest prevalence (4.1 per 1000 live births) found among Alaska Natives born between 1985 and 1988. Screening and referral programs to diagnostic clinics identified 70% of all recorded cases. The intervention program for children 0 to 3 years of age detected 29% of age-appropriate cases, and Medicaid data identified 11% of all cases; birth certificates detected only 9% of the age-appropriate cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate a high prevalence of fetal alcohol syndrome in Alaska and illustrate that reliance on any one data source would lead to underestimates of the extent of fetal alcohol syndrome in a population.
PubMed ID
9585745 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fetal alcohol syndrome--Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, and New York, 1995-1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4419
Source
JAMA. 2002 Jul 3;288(1):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-3-2002

Lack of recognition and complexity of foetal alcohol neuroimpairments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78095
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Feb;96(2):237-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Elgen I.
Bruaroy S.
Laegreid L M
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Bergen, Norway. irene.elgen@helse-bergen.no
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Feb;96(2):237-41
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol-Induced Disorders, Nervous System - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Competence
Education, Medical
Female
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Social Work - education
Abstract
AIMS: To obtain the recorded prevalence of foetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and foetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) in Norway, and evaluate the effect of a general information program to increase the recognition of FAS/FASD for health care and social workers. METHODS: A questionnaire regarding prevalence of FAS/FASD was sent to all Norwegian paediatric and child psychiatry departments. In the region Hordaland county, an information program was carried out to educate health-care and social workers on symptoms and signs of FAS/FASD, and referral was encouraged for suspected cases. Referred children received a neuropaediatric evaluation, and the effect of the information program on recorded FAS/FASD was recorded. RESULTS: Based on the national survey, a prevalence of 0.3 per 1000 was calculated. After the information program, the estimated prevalence in Hordaland County increased to 1.5 per 1000. In 5 years, 25 children were diagnosed with FAS and 22 with FASD. One-third of all children were mentally retarded. Microcephaly and neuroimpairments were more common among FAS children. Almost all children met the criteria of ADHD. CONCLUSION: The rate of FAS/FASD may be greatly underestimated because of lack of knowledge. An information program aimed at health-care and social workers is effective.
PubMed ID
17429912 View in PubMed
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Maternal smoking in pregnancy and externalizing behavior in 18-month-old children: results from a population-based prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89888
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Mar;48(3):283-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Stene-Larsen Kim
Borge Anne I H
Vollrath Margarete E
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Postbox 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway. kim.stene-larsen@fhi.no
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Mar;48(3):283-9
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggression - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - psychology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - psychology
Female
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Internal-External Control
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Maternal Behavior - psychology
Norway
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology - psychology
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The relation between prenatal smoking and child behavioral problems has been investigated in children of school age and older, but prospective studies in younger children are lacking. Using the population-based prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, we examined the risk for externalizing behaviors among 18-month-old children after exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy. METHOD: Participants were 22,545 mothers and their 18-month-old children. Mothers reported their smoking habits at the 17th week of gestation and their child's externalizing behavior at 18 months of age by means of standardized questionnaires. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, with scores of externalizing behavior above the 88.6th percentile as the dependent variable and self-reported smoking as the independent variable. We examined the child's sex as a possible moderator. RESULTS: We documented a threshold effect of smoking 10 cigarettes or more per day during pregnancy on subsequent externalizing behaviors among 18-month-old children, even after adjusting for relevant confounders (odds ratio 1.32, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.70). The child's sex did not moderate these effects (odds ratio 0.98, 95% confidence interval 0.83-1.16). CONCLUSIONS: Maternal smoking during pregnancy increases offspring's subsequent risk for externalizing behavior problems at 18 months of age. The pattern of risk does not differ between boys and girls. Our findings suggest a population attributable risk of 17.5% (i.e., the proportion of externalizing cases that could potentially be avoided if prenatal smoking was eliminated or reduced to fewer than 10 cigarettes per day).
PubMed ID
19242291 View in PubMed
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A multiple source methodology for the surveillance of fetal alcohol syndrome--The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Surveillance Network (FASSNet).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4418
Source
Teratology. 2002;66 Suppl 1:S41-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002

Prenatal origins of poor sleep in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94357
Source
Sleep. 2009 Aug 1;32(8):1086-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2009
Author
Pesonen Anu-Katriina
Räikkönen Katri
Matthews Karen
Heinonen Kati
Paavonen Juulia E
Lahti Jari
Komsi Niina
Lemola Sakari
Järvenpää Anna-Liisa
Kajantie Eero
Strandberg Timo
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Sleep. 2009 Aug 1;32(8):1086-92
Date
Aug-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Body Height
Body Size
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Monitoring, Ambulatory
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Sleep Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVES: We examined whether small body size at birth and prenatal tobacco or alcohol exposure predict poor sleep and more sleep disturbances in children. DESIGN: An epidemiologic cohort study of 289 eight-year-old children born at term. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Sleep duration and efficiency were measured by actigraphy for 7 consecutive nights (mean = 7.1, SD = 1.2). We used both continuous measures of poor sleep and binary variables of short sleep and low sleep efficiency (
PubMed ID
19725260 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.