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6 records – page 1 of 1.

High incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma in Iceland and the Faroe Islands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21292
Source
Br J Cancer. 1999 Jan;79(2):373
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999

Metal removal efficiency, operational life and secondary environmental impacts of a stormwater filter developed from iron-oxide-amended bottom ash.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290056
Source
J Environ Sci Health A Tox Hazard Subst Environ Eng. 2017 Dec 06; 52(14):1330-1340
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-06-2017
Author
Aamir Ilyas
Tone M Muthanna
Author Affiliation
a Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering , Norwegian University of Science and Technology , Trondheim , Norway.
Source
J Environ Sci Health A Tox Hazard Subst Environ Eng. 2017 Dec 06; 52(14):1330-1340
Date
Dec-06-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adsorption
Coal Ash - chemistry
Equipment Design
Ferric Compounds - chemistry
Filtration
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Pilot Projects
Rain - chemistry
Time Factors
Waste Water - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Purification - methods
Abstract
The aim of this paper was to conduct pilot-scale column tests on an alternative treatment filter designed for the treatment of highway stormwater in cold climates. The study evaluated adsorption performance of the filter with regard to the four most commonly found metals (Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in highway stormwater. An alternative method was used to estimate the operational life of the filter from the adsorption test data without a breakthrough under high hydraulic loads. The potential environmental impact of the filter was assessed by comparing desorption test data with four different environmental quality standards. The proposed filter achieved high adsorption (over 90%) of the target metals. The comparisons of desorption and leaching data with the environmental standards indicated that iron-oxide/bottom ash was non-hazardous, reusable and without serious environmental risks. The operational life and filter dimensions were highly dependent on rainfall depth, which indicated that the filter design would have to be adapted to suit the climate. To fully appreciate the performance and environmental aspects, the filter unit should be tested in the field and the testing should explicitly include ecotoxicological and life cycle impacts.
PubMed ID
28961058 View in PubMed
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Modified Fenton oxidation of diesel fuel in arctic soils rich in organic matter and iron.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257341
Source
Chemosphere. 2014 Oct;113:56-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Mary K Sherwood
Daniel P Cassidy
Author Affiliation
Kent County Department of Public Works, 1500 Scribner NW, Grand Rapids, MI 49504, United States.
Source
Chemosphere. 2014 Oct;113:56-61
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
Chelating Agents
Edetic Acid
Environmental Remediation - methods
Ferric Compounds - chemistry
Gasoline - analysis
Humic Substances - analysis
Hydrogen Peroxide - chemistry
Iron - chemistry
Models, Chemical
Oxidation-Reduction
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Abstract
Modified Fenton (MF) chemistry was tested in the laboratory to treat three diesel fuel-contaminated soils from the Canadian arctic rich in soil organic matter (SOM) and Fe oxides. Reactors were dosed with hydrogen peroxide (HP), and treatment was compared in reactors with SOM as the only chelate vs. reactors to which ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) was added. Concentrations of diesel fuel and HP were measured over time, and the oxidation of both diesel fuel and SOM were quantified in each soil. A distinct selectivity for oxidation of diesel fuel over SOM was observed. Reactors with EDTA showed significantly less diesel fuel oxidation and lower oxidant efficiency (diesel fuel oxidized/HP consumed) than reactors with SOM as the only chelate. The results from these studies demonstrate that MF chemistry can be an effective remedial tool for contaminated arctic soils, and challenge the traditional conceptual model that SOM reduces the efficiency of MF treatment through excessive scavenging of oxidant.
PubMed ID
25065790 View in PubMed
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[Role of the Microbial Community in Formation of Speleothem (Moonmilk) in the Snezhnaya Carst Cave (Abkhazia).]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289528
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2016 Sep; 85(5):598-608
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2016
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2016 Sep; 85(5):598-608
Date
Sep-2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Calcium - chemistry
Calcium Carbonate - chemistry
Caves - microbiology
Cold Temperature
Comamonadaceae - growth & development - metabolism
Ferric Compounds - chemistry
Russia
Abstract
The resi Its of investigation of speleothem (moonmilk) from the Snezhnaya cave (West Caucasus, Abkhazia) are-reported. The structure of microbial complexes from moonmilk was investigated by quantita- tive PCR; strains of culturable microorganisms were isolated and their preferred temperature and carbon sources were determined. Among eubacteria, -34% belonged to the iron bacteria (Rhodoferax). Most bacte- rial strains were shown to be facultative psychrophiles with the maximum growth rate at 4C. The microstruc- ture and elemental composition of mionmilk were investigated using a scanning electron microscope (EVO- 40HV, Carl Zeiss) and silicon drifi X-ay detector X-MAX 80 ffM2' The visually plastic and homogeneous mass of moonmilk was shown to be highly heterogeneous, containing various microstructures. The elemental composition of some nanostructures depended on the structure of bacterial biofilms. Some loci of the biofilm were found to contain up to 46% (wt/wt) of iron oxides. Calcium content was high, up to 61.5% (wt/wt) only in cubic crystalline structures which were not involved in microbiological processes.
PubMed ID
29364607 View in PubMed
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[Role of the Microbial Community in Formation of Speleothem (Moonmilk) in the Snezhnaya Carst Cave (Abkhazia).]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289686
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2016 Sep; 85(5):598-608
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2016
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2016 Sep; 85(5):598-608
Date
Sep-2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Calcium - chemistry
Calcium Carbonate - chemistry
Caves - microbiology
Cold Temperature
Comamonadaceae - growth & development - metabolism
Ferric Compounds - chemistry
Russia
Abstract
The resi Its of investigation of speleothem (moonmilk) from the Snezhnaya cave (West Caucasus, Abkhazia) are-reported. The structure of microbial complexes from moonmilk was investigated by quantita- tive PCR; strains of culturable microorganisms were isolated and their preferred temperature and carbon sources were determined. Among eubacteria, -34% belonged to the iron bacteria (Rhodoferax). Most bacte- rial strains were shown to be facultative psychrophiles with the maximum growth rate at 4C. The microstruc- ture and elemental composition of mionmilk were investigated using a scanning electron microscope (EVO- 40HV, Carl Zeiss) and silicon drifi X-ay detector X-MAX 80 ffM2' The visually plastic and homogeneous mass of moonmilk was shown to be highly heterogeneous, containing various microstructures. The elemental composition of some nanostructures depended on the structure of bacterial biofilms. Some loci of the biofilm were found to contain up to 46% (wt/wt) of iron oxides. Calcium content was high, up to 61.5% (wt/wt) only in cubic crystalline structures which were not involved in microbiological processes.
PubMed ID
29364607 View in PubMed
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A systematic screening of total antioxidants in dietary plants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61700
Source
J Nutr. 2002 Mar;132(3):461-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Bente L Halvorsen
Kari Holte
Mari C W Myhrstad
Ingrid Barikmo
Erlend Hvattum
Siv Fagertun Remberg
Anne-Brit Wold
Karin Haffner
Halvard Baugerød
Lene Frost Andersen
Ø. Moskaug
David R Jacobs
Rune Blomhoff
Author Affiliation
Institute for Nutrition Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Nutr. 2002 Mar;132(3):461-71
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - analysis
Asteraceae - chemistry
Cereals - chemistry
Diet
Ericaceae - chemistry
Fabaceae - chemistry
Ferric Compounds - chemistry
Ferrous Compounds - chemistry
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Juglandaceae - chemistry
Norway
Nuts - chemistry
Oxidation-Reduction
Plant Roots - chemistry
Plants, Edible - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rosaceae - chemistry
Seeds - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Zingiberaceae - chemistry
Abstract
A predominantly plant-based diet reduces the risk for development of several chronic diseases. It is often assumed that antioxidants contribute to this protection, but results from intervention trials with single antioxidants administered as supplements quite consistently do not support any benefit. Because dietary plants contain several hundred different antioxidants, it would be useful to know the total concentration of electron-donating antioxidants (i.e., reductants) in individual items. Such data might be useful in the identification of the most beneficial dietary plants. We have assessed systematically total antioxidants in a variety of dietary plants used worldwide, including various fruits, berries, vegetables, cereals, nuts and pulses. When possible, we analyzed three or more samples of dietary plants from three different geographic regions in the world. Total antioxidants was assessed by the reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) (i.e., the FRAP assay), which occurred rapidly with all reductants with half-reaction reduction potentials above that of Fe(3+)/Fe(2+). The values, therefore, expressed the corresponding concentration of electron-donating antioxidants. Our results demonstrated that there is more than a 1000-fold difference among total antioxidants in various dietary plants. Plants that contain most antioxidants included members of several families, such as Rosaceae (dog rose, sour cherry, blackberry, strawberry, raspberry), Empetraceae (crowberry), Ericaceae (blueberry), Grossulariaceae (black currant), Juglandaceae (walnut), Asteraceae (sunflower seed), Punicaceae (pomegranate) and Zingiberaceae (ginger). In a Norwegian diet, fruits, berries and cereals contributed 43.6%, 27.1% and 11.7%, respectively, of the total intake of plant antioxidants. Vegetables contributed only 8.9%. The systematic analysis presented here will facilitate research into the nutritional role of the combined effect of antioxidants in dietary plants.
PubMed ID
11880572 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.