Skip header and navigation

Refine By

94 records – page 1 of 10.

Administration of different Lactobacillus strains in fermented oatmeal soup: in vivo colonization of human intestinal mucosa and effect on the indigenous flora.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222069
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1993 Jan;59(1):15-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1993
Author
M L Johansson
G. Molin
B. Jeppsson
S. Nobaek
S. Ahrné
S. Bengmark
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Technology, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1993 Jan;59(1):15-20
Date
Jan-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cereals - microbiology
Female
Fermentation
Food Microbiology
Genotype
Humans
Intestinal Mucosa - microbiology
Lactobacillus - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Species Specificity
Abstract
In vivo colonization by different Lactobacillus strains on human intestinal mucosa of healthy volunteers was studied together with the effect of Lactobacillus administration on different groups of indigenous bacteria. A total of 19 test strains were administered in fermented oatmeal soup containing 5 x 10(6) CFU of each strain per ml by using a dose of 100 ml of soup per day for 10 days. Biopsies were taken from both the upper jejunum and the rectum 1 day before administration was started and 1 and 11 days after administration was terminated. The administration significantly increased the Lactobacillus counts on the jejunum mucosa, and high levels remained 11 days after administration was terminated. The levels of streptococci increased by 10- to 100-fold in two persons, and the levels of sulfite-reducing clostridia in the jejunum decreased by 10- to 100-fold in three of the volunteers 1 day after administration was terminated. In recta, the anaerobic bacterium counts and the gram-negative anaerobic bacterium counts decreased significantly by the end of administration. Furthermore, a decrease in the number of members of the Enterobacteriaceae by 1,000-fold was observed on the rectal mucosa of two persons. Randomly picked Lactobacillus isolates were identified phenotypically by API 50CH tests and genotypically by the plasmid profiles of strains and by restriction endonuclease analysis of chromosomal DNAs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
Notes
Cites: Appl Microbiol. 1974 May;27(5):961-794598229
Cites: Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek. 1992 Apr;61(3):175-831325752
Cites: Annu Rev Microbiol. 1977;31:107-33334036
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1978 Mar 9;298(10):531-4625309
Cites: Am J Hosp Pharm. 1979 Jun;36(6):754-7111546
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 1979 Sep;5(5):531-7115830
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 1979;11(3):233-42118526
Cites: Surg Clin North Am. 1980 Feb;60(1):197-2127361222
Cites: J Appl Bacteriol. 1979 Oct;47(2):197-208120356
Cites: J Dairy Sci. 1980 Mar;63(3):353-76768778
Cites: Eur J Pediatr. 1982 Sep;139(1):18-216816601
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 1987;19(5):531-73122316
Cites: Surgery. 1988 Aug;104(2):185-903135625
Cites: Surgery. 1988 Nov;104(5):917-233055397
Cites: Infection. 1988;16(6):329-363146551
Cites: World J Surg. 1990 Mar-Apr;14(2):191-52183481
Cites: Ann Med. 1990 Feb;22(1):57-92184848
Cites: Br J Surg. 1992 Jul;79(7):614-231643468
Cites: Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek. 1992 Apr;61(3):167-731519914
Cites: J Bacteriol. 1976 Sep;127(3):1576-8821936
PubMed ID
8439146 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alloscardovia omnicolens gen. nov., sp. nov., from human clinical samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162515
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2007 Jul;57(Pt 7):1442-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Geert Huys
Marc Vancanneyt
Klaas D'Haene
Enevold Falsen
Georges Wauters
Peter Vandamme
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Microbiology, Ghent University, K. L. Ledeganckstraat 35, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. geert.huys@UGent.be
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2007 Jul;57(Pt 7):1442-6
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Aerobiosis
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Base Composition
Belgium
Chaperonin 60 - genetics
Cluster analysis
DNA Fingerprinting
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
Fermentation
Genes, rRNA
Genotype
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - microbiology
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Norway
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
RNA, Bacterial - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid
Sweden
Abstract
The taxonomic position of 12 isolates tentatively assigned to the genus Bifidobacterium on the basis of a limited phenotypic characterization was examined. The isolates were collected between 1978 and 2005 in Belgium, Sweden and Norway, and originated from various human clinical samples, including urine, blood, urethra, oral cavity, tonsil, and abscesses of lung and aortic valve. On the basis of band number and clustering analysis, repetitive DNA element-based PCR fingerprinting using the BOXA1R and (GTG)(5) primers indicated that the clinical isolates represented a taxon probably not belonging to the genus Bifidobacterium. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities revealed that the isolates were most closely affiliated to Parascardovia denticolens LMG 18312(T) (93.0-93.2 %), Scardovia inopinata LMG 18313(T) (92.9-93.1 %) and other members of the Bifidobacteriaceae, indicating that the isolates belong to a novel genus within that family. This observation was further substantiated by the results of partial sequencing of the heat-shock protein 60 gene (hsp60) and determination of the DNA G+C contents (47.3-48.3 mol%). Members of the novel taxon can be phenotypically distinguished from S. inopinata, P. denticolens and Gardnerella vaginalis by the ability to grow on agar under aerobic conditions and on the basis of positive reactions for acid production from L-arabinose, raffinose, salicin and D-xylose. Unambiguous phenotypic differentiation from Aeriscardovia aeriphila and Bifidobacterium species may be difficult, so phenotypic analyses should be complemented by molecular methods. The values for DNA-DNA binding among four members of the novel genus were in the range of 89-100 %, indicating that the strains should be considered as a single novel species of a novel genus, for which the name Alloscardovia omnicolens gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Alloscardovia omnicolens is CCUG 31649(T) (=LMG 23792(T)).
PubMed ID
17625172 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Amperometric biosensor for ethanol analysis in wines and grape must during wine fermentation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9059
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2005 Jan-Feb;77(1):96-103
Publication Type
Article
Author
L V Shkotova
E A Slast'ia
T A Zhyliakova
O P Soldatkin
W. Schuhmann
S V Dziadevych
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2005 Jan-Feb;77(1):96-103
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biosensing Techniques - instrumentation - methods
Electrochemistry
Electrodes
English Abstract
Equipment Design
Ethanol - analysis
Fermentation
Reproducibility of Results
Wine - analysis - standards
Abstract
The amperometric biosensor for ethanol determination based on alcohol oxidase immobilised by the method of electrochemical polymerization has been developed. The industrial screen-printed platinum electrodes were used as transducers for creation of amperometric alcohol biosensor. Optimal conditions for electrochemical deposition of an active membrane with alcohol oxidase has been determined. Biosensors are characterised by good reproducibility and operational stability with minimal detection limit of ethanol 8 x 10(-5) M. The good correlation of results for ethanol detection in wine and during wine fermentation by using the developed amperometric biosensor with the data obtained by the standard methods was shown (r = 0.995).
PubMed ID
16335276 View in PubMed
Less detail

An outbreak of Escherichia coli O103:H25 - bacteriological investigations and genotyping of isolates from food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150192
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2009 Aug 15;133(3):259-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2009
Author
Camilla Sekse
Kristin O'Sullivan
Per Einar Granum
Liv Marit Rørvik
Yngvild Wasteson
Hannah Joan Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Safety and Infection Biology, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2009 Aug 15;133(3):259-64
Date
Aug-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Colony Count, Microbial
Disease Outbreaks
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Fermentation
Food Microbiology
Genotype
Humans
Meat Products - microbiology
Norway - epidemiology
Sheep - microbiology
Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
During the spring of 2006, a national disease outbreak caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O103:H25 was investigated in Norway. At the time of the outbreak the Norwegian School of Veterinary Science was the national reference laboratory for E. coli O157 in food, and the microbiological investigations to identify the food source were performed there. Food- and environmental samples (n=931) were collected by the Norwegian Food Safety Authorities following two different hypotheses i) that minced meat was the source of STEC, and ii) that fermented sausage was the source of STEC. Twenty seven food samples, all collected following the latter hypothesis contained eae-positive E. coli O103:H25, but none of these were stx-positive. By PFGE it was shown that isolates from one particular type of fermented sausage "morr sausage 1" were identical to the isolates from patients. Samples of sheep meat that were linked epidemiologically to meat used for sausage production also contained isolates identical or closely related to patient strains. The presented study underpins epidemiological indications that fermented sausage was the source of the outbreak, but points specifically to one particular brand of sausage as the source.
PubMed ID
19540608 View in PubMed
Less detail

An outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection in southern Sweden associated with consumption of fermented sausage; aspects of sausage production that increase the risk of contamination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87458
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2008 Mar;136(3):370-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Sartz L.
De Jong B.
Hjertqvist M.
Plym-Forshell L.
Alsterlund R.
Löfdahl S.
Osterman B.
Ståhl A.
Eriksson E.
Hansson H-B
Karpman D.
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2008 Mar;136(3):370-80
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cookery
Disease Outbreaks
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Escherichia coli O157 - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Feces - microbiology
Female
Fermentation
Food Microbiology
Humans
Male
Meat - microbiology
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A large outbreak of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infections occurred in southern Sweden during autumn 2002. A matched case-control study was performed and indicated an association between consumption of fermented sausage and EHEC infection (odds ratio 5.4, P
PubMed ID
17445322 View in PubMed
Less detail

The antihypertensive effect of fermented milk in individuals with prehypertension or borderline hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100641
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Oct;24(10):678-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
L. Usinger
L T Jensen
B. Flambard
A. Linneberg
H. Ibsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. lotusi01@glo.regionh.dk
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Oct;24(10):678-83
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Cultured Milk Products - metabolism
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Female
Fermentation
Heart rate
Humans
Hypertension - diet therapy - physiopathology
Lactobacillus helveticus - metabolism
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Placebo Effect
Prehypertension - diet therapy - physiopathology
Time Factors
Treatment Failure
Abstract
Fermented milk (FM) with putative antihypertensive effect in humans could be an easy applicable lifestyle intervention against hypertension. The mode of action is supposed to be through active milk peptides, shown to possess in vitro ACE-inhibitory effect. Blood pressure (BP) reductions upto 23?mm?Hg have been reported in spontaneously hypertensive rats fed FM. Results from human studies of the antihypertensive effect are inconsistent. However, many studies suffer from methodological weaknesses, as insufficient blinding and the use of office BP measurements. We conducted a randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled study of the antihypertensive effect of Lactobacillus helveticus FM in 94 prehypertensive and borderline hypertensive subjects. The participants were randomised into three treatment groups with a daily intake of 150?ml of FM, 300?ml of FM or placebo (chemically acidified milk). The primary outcome was repeated 24-h ambulatory BP measurements. There were no statistically significant differences in the outcome between the groups (systolic BP (SBP), P=0.9; diastolic BP (DBP), P=0.2). However, the group receiving 300?ml FM had reduced BP across the 8-week period in several readings, which could be compatible with a minor antihypertensive effect. Heart rate and lipids remained unchanged between groups. Hence, our study does not support earlier studies measuring office BP-measurements, reporting antihypertensive effect of FM. Based on straight performed 24-h ambulatory BP measurements, milk fermented with Lactobacillus helveticus does not posses significant antihypertensive effect.
PubMed ID
20147968 View in PubMed
Less detail

Application of state-of-art sequencing technologies to indigenous food fermentations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120880
Source
Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2013 Apr;24(2):178-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Sacha A F T van Hijum
Elaine E Vaughan
Rudi F Vogel
Author Affiliation
NIZO Food Research, Kluyver Centre for Genomics of Industrial Fermentation, P.O. Box 20, 6710 BA Ede, The Netherlands. svhijum@cmbi.ru.nl
Source
Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2013 Apr;24(2):178-86
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - microbiology
Diet
Ecosystem
Fermentation - genetics
Food Microbiology - methods
Humans
Metagenome - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA - methods
Abstract
Fermented foods and beverages are an integral part of the human diet globally. Understanding the microbial interactions within these fermenting ecosystems is required to deliver safe products with desirable consumer properties, and moreover, maintenance of these traditions. Effective tools are required for documentation of cultures in traditional and artisanal fermented products, for sensory quality and safety improvements, in some cases for starter culture design for commercialization and potentially for supporting sustainable food systems. Here we trace the developments of sequence-based molecular technologies for investigating the diversity and functionality of microbiota in traditional or indigenous fermented foods and beverages. The opportunities of phylobiomics, metagenomics and metatranscriptomics to enrich our knowledge of fermenting microbial ecosystems are presented.
PubMed ID
22960050 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Bacteria involved in the process of methanic fermentation of alcoholic molasses mash]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13627
Source
Mikrobiol Zh. 1966;28(5):19-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966

Behavior of Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus in Chouri├žo de Vinho, a dry fermented sausage made from wine-marinated meat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114836
Source
J Food Prot. 2013 Apr;76(4):588-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
J García Díez
L. Patarata
Author Affiliation
Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Centre of Studies in Animal and Veterinary Science, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal.
Source
J Food Prot. 2013 Apr;76(4):588-94
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Fermentation
Food Contamination - analysis - prevention & control
Food Handling - methods
Food Microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Meat Products - microbiology
Salmonella - growth & development
Staphylococcus aureus - growth & development
Abstract
Portuguese chouriço de vinho is made by drying coarsely minced meat and fat that has been previously marinated with wine (usually red), salt, and garlic for 1 to 2 days at a low temperature (4 to 8 °C). This procedure may improve the microbiological safety of the product. The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of three pathogens in this product, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, to establish the minimum period of drying and maturation necessary to render safe products. The pathogens were inoculated in the chouriço de vinho batter. A factorial design was used to study the following variables in the fermentation process: (i) the presence or absence of an indigenous Lactobacillus sakei starter culture; (ii) the presence or absence of fermentable carbohydrates; and (iii) the salt level (1.5 or 3%). The samples were analyzed 24 h after the preparation of the batter (at stuffing); after 7, 15, and 30 days of drying; and after 30 days of storage at 4 °C under vacuum. Under all of the conditions studied, the levels of the three pathogens decreased during the drying period. In the early stages of drying, the addition of L. sakei starter culture and/or carbohydrates resulted in lower levels of gram-positive pathogens. After 15 days of drying, populations of all pathogens decreased by ca. 2 log in all samples. At that sampling time, L. monocytogenes was undetectable in the chouriço de vinho with L. sakei starter culture and carbohydrates. The mean count of S. aureus after 15 days of drying was below 1 log CFU/g. After 30 days of drying, no pathogens were detected. The drying period could be shortened to 15 days when considering only the gram-positive pathogens studied and the use of a starter culture and carbohydrates. Due to the low infective dose of Salmonella spp., the product should be considered safe after 30 days, when this pathogen became undetectable.
PubMed ID
23575119 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biological activity in traditional Alaska pollack sikhae during low temperature fermentation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75487
Source
Biofactors. 2004;22(1-4):319-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Yong-Jun Cha
Eun-Jeong Jeong
Hun Kim
Woo-Jin Cho
Gi-Jin Nam
Author Affiliation
Department of Food and Nutrition, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773, South Korea. yjcha@changwon.ac.kr
Source
Biofactors. 2004;22(1-4):319-21
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Antioxidants - isolation & purification
Chitin - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Fermentation
Fishes
Food Handling - methods
Gram-Positive Bacteria - drug effects
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Oligosaccharides - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Temperature
Abstract
Biological activity was examined on Alaska pollack sikhae produced with 4 treatments (by irradiating at 5 or 10 kGy, or by adding either 0.1 or 0.3% of chitooligosaccharide), compared with control (2-step fermentation only) during fermentation at -2 degrees C. The extracts (500 ppm level) of sikhae had antimicrobial activities against 4 different strains of food poisoning bacteria such as Staphy. aureus, B. subtilis, B. cereus, and L. monocytogenes. Antioxidative activity (EDA(50), 11.55 mg/mL) in control group increased with time up to 60 days of fermentation but decreased thereafter, while those levels in other products were kept within 10.60-18.30 mg/mL ranges during fermentation. Inhibitory activity of angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) (IC(50), 1.51-2.89 mg/mL) in all products was observed during fermentation except at 0 day. Inhibitory activity of xanthine oxidase (XO) (IC(50), 0.65-0.87 mg/mL) in all products also increased with time up to 30 days of fermentation. Without irradiating or adding of chitooligosaccharide, Alaska pollack sikhae showing biological activities was enough by 2-step fermentation and storage at -2 degrees C only.
PubMed ID
15630304 View in PubMed
Less detail

94 records – page 1 of 10.