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107 records – page 1 of 11.

Adult and pediatric fellowship programs in critical care medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245319
Source
Crit Care Med. 1980 Nov;8(11):693-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980
Source
Sykepleien. 1988 Jul 7;76(13):25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-7-1988
Author
B A Ostby
Source
Sykepleien. 1988 Jul 7;76(13):25
Date
Jul-7-1988
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - nursing
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Fellowships and Scholarships
Humans
Norway
PubMed ID
3420516 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Albert Renold fellowship 1993 (II). Carani B. Sanjeevi, Stockholm, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48520
Source
Diabetologia. 1993 Oct;36(10):suppl 43-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Source
Diabetologia. 1993 Oct;36(10):suppl 43-4
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - genetics
Fellowships and Scholarships
History, 20th Century
India
Portraits
Sweden
PubMed ID
8243844 View in PubMed
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American Society of Neuroradiology research survey 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189259
Source
Acad Radiol. 2002 Jul;9(7):810-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Annette J Johnson
Vincent P Mathews
Angelo Artemakis
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Radiology Education and Research Institute, Indianapolis 46202, USA.
Source
Acad Radiol. 2002 Jul;9(7):810-4
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Fellowships and Scholarships
Humans
Neurology
Radiology
Research - economics - statistics & numerical data
Research Support as Topic
Societies, Medical
United States
Abstract
Research is a critical component of the mission of academic radiology, and success in research is necessary for the future of neuroradiology. Thus, the authors set out to establish a baseline of research activities of American Society of Neuroradiology (ASNR) members.
The authors surveyed 100 fellowship program directors. The survey was Web based, with recruitment from the ASNR Fellowship Database survey site and with e-mail and fax solicitations to the Web site. Questions focused on neuroradiologist and neuroradiology fellow involvement in research.
Forty-eight of the 100 program directors (48%) responded. Several key findings emerged: (a) About one-third of fellowship programs require all fellows to do some research, with most fellows receiving less than 1 day per week of academic time; (b) just over half of the programs expect fellows to publish a paper; (c) about two-thirds of academic neuroradiologists get at least 1 academic day per week; (d) most academic neuroradiologists perform research, but most of this research is unfunded; and (e) about nine of 10 academic sections have at least one neuroradiologist with some extramural funding.
The relative lack of extramural funding among academic neuroradiologists is a reality that is probably multifactorial; however, there may be a direct relationship between amount of academic time free from clinical duties and successful competition for funding. The time (and, thus, financial) support of research-oriented fellows and faculty should be increased.
PubMed ID
12139097 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of procedural training in Canadian respirology fellowship programs: program directors' and fellows' perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151287
Source
Can Respir J. 2009 Mar-Apr;16(2):55-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
D R Stather
J. Jarand
G A Silvestri
A. Tremblay
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. drstathe@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2009 Mar-Apr;16(2):55-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bronchoscopy
Canada
Clinical Competence
Data Collection
Fellowships and Scholarships
Health Educators
Humans
Program Evaluation - standards
Pulmonary Medicine - education
Students, Medical
Abstract
In recent years, there has been a rapid growth in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures performed by respirologists.
To assess the number and type of procedures performed in Canadian respirology training programs, for comparison with the American College of Chest Physicians minimum competency guidelines, and to assess fellow satisfaction with procedural training during their fellowships.
Internet-based surveys of Canadian respirology fellows and respirology fellowship program directors were conducted.
Response rates for program director and respirology fellow surveys were 71% (10 of 14) and 62% (41 of 66), respectively. Thirty-eight per cent of respirology fellows reported the presence of an interventional pulmonologist at their institution. Flexible bronchoscopy was the only procedure reported by a large majority of respirology fellows (79.5%) to meet American College of Chest Physicians recommendations (100 procedures). As reported by respirology fellows, recommended numbers of procedures were met by 59.5% of fellows for tube thoracostomy, 21% for transbronchial needle aspiration and 5.4% for closed pleural biopsy. Respirology fellows in programs with an interventional pulmonologist were more likely to have completed some form of additional interventional bronchoscopy training (80% versus 32%; P=0.003), had increased exposure to and expressed improved satisfaction with training in advanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, but did not increase their likelihood of achieving recommended numbers for any procedures.
Canadian respirology fellows perform lower numbers of basic respiratory procedures, other than flexible bronchoscopy, than that suggested by the American College of Chest Physicians guidelines. Exposure and training in advanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures is minimal. A concerted effort to improve procedural training is required to improve these results.
Notes
Cites: Chest. 2000 Sep;118(3):572-310988171
Cites: Chest. 1989 Dec;96(6):1228-322582826
Cites: Chest. 1991 Dec;100(6):1668-751959412
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995 Feb;151(2 Pt 1):282-77842180
Cites: Chest. 1997 Jul;112(1):251-39228384
Cites: Chest. 2005 May;127(5):1614-2115888836
Cites: Chest. 2007 Jan;131(1):261-7417218585
Cites: Chest. 2001 Oct;120(4):1333-911591579
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2002 Feb;19(2):356-7311866017
Cites: Chest. 2003 May;123(5):1693-71712740291
Cites: Chest. 2004 Feb;125(2):527-3114769734
Cites: Ann Thorac Surg. 2004 Jul;78(1):287-91; discussion 287-9115223446
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1978 Jul;118(1):17-21677557
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1983 Mar;127(3):344-76830056
Cites: Chest. 1989 May;95(5):1130-82651036
Cites: Chest. 2000 Sep;118(3):625-3010988182
PubMed ID
19399309 View in PubMed
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[A questionnaire among 171 students with MB enrolled in a PhD program. Financing, time schedules and future research and clinical training].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200172
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Sep 27;161(39):5418-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-27-1999
Author
H. Grønbaek
E M Hauge
Author Affiliation
Aarhus Universitet, Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet. henning.gronbaek@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Sep 27;161(39):5418-22
Date
Sep-27-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Education, Medical, Continuing
Employment
Fellowships and Scholarships
Humans
Personnel Selection
Questionnaires
Research
Research Support as Topic
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Abstract
One hundred and seventy-one medical doctors registered as Ph.D.-students at the Faculty of Health Science, University of Aarhus, Denmark, were asked to answer a questionnaire concerning the local Ph.D.-programme. No financial problems were revealed concerning the wages of 69% of the Ph.D.-students, however 31% had financial problems. One third of the Ph.D.-students found it difficult to complete the Ph.D.-programme within the scheduled three years and delays were expected. Most Ph.D.-students intended to continue research after their Ph.D.-study, suggesting that the Ph.D.-programme promotes the scientific education of future generations of medical doctors. However, problems concerning the recruitment of physicians into preclinical/theoretical medicine were revealed and it is suggested that steps should be taken to ease career planning in this field.
PubMed ID
10553354 View in PubMed
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Bringing hope and care to the poor, dispossessed and homeless of Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174529
Source
Br J Community Nurs. 2005 May;10(5):223
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Karen Daniel
Source
Br J Community Nurs. 2005 May;10(5):223
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Fellowships and Scholarships
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Red Cross
Relief Work
Russia
PubMed ID
15923988 View in PubMed
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Canadian research fellowship training programs in digestive sciences: achievements and challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195261
Source
Clin Invest Med. 2001 Feb;24(1):44-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
I T Beck
W T Depew
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont.
Source
Clin Invest Med. 2001 Feb;24(1):44-53
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Career Choice
Digestive System
Fellowships and Scholarships
Humans
Questionnaires
Research
Training Support
Universities
Abstract
The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG) is committed to fostering the development of future Canadian investigators. Up to 1986, research fellowship support was obtained from the Medical Research Council (MRC) of Canada. Since that time, several peer-reviewed, industry-sponsored, CAG-supported research fellowships and a variety of independently funded awards have augmented this effort. In the same period, peer-reviewed operating grants (OGs) from the MRC and other agencies have been constrained. The aim of this study was to determine the success of CAG, MRC or any other Canadian research fellowships in the development of career investigators in digestive sciences and to identify factors influencing the outcomes of such training.
MRC records and the minutes of CAG annual meetings were reviewed to identify research fellowship support. Canadian program directors were requested to list research fellows affiliated with their groups between 1986 and 1997. Only fellowships providing at least 1 year of training were included. A 7-page questionnaire detailing biographic characteristics, the site and duration, and specific issues related to the quality of research training was sent to identified trainees. Significant associations between success in achieving an academic appointment or OG support and several variables of training were identified.
Eighty-six research fellows were trained. Responses were obtained from 43 of them. The demographic characteristics of the whole group and the respondents were similar. Of the respondents, 81% of trainees obtained academic appointments. Fellowships longer than 1 year were associated with higher rates of academic posting, and MRC-funded fellows had greater success rates of academic appointments. Of eligible trainees 63% have obtained OG support. None of the other variables examined predicted success. Of the trainees responding, 85% valued the fellowship very highly.
The establishment of the additional research fellowships has fostered the development of career investigators in digestive sciences. The high success rate of former trainees in obtaining academic appointments and OG support suggests that the fellowship programs are effective and appropriately oriented. The structure of the current programs does not require substantial revision. OG support for new investigators appears now to lag substantially.
PubMed ID
11266031 View in PubMed
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Cardiology fellowship subspecialty training opportunities in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199867
Source
Hosp Med. 1999 Aug;60(8):588-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
P. Mazeika
N. Prasad
Source
Hosp Med. 1999 Aug;60(8):588-91
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiology - education
Education, Medical, Graduate
Emigration and Immigration
Fellowships and Scholarships
Humans
Inservice training
Internship and Residency
Abstract
Overseas experience broadens horizons, provides a different perspective on medicine and enhances a doctor's professional credibility. This article covers cardiology subspecialty training opportunities in Canada and offers advice on finding a job, the application process and acclimatization into Canadian life.
PubMed ID
10621816 View in PubMed
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107 records – page 1 of 11.