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129 records – page 1 of 13.

Accuracy of Canadian health administrative databases in identifying patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a validation study using the medical records of rheumatologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114676
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Oct;65(10):1582-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Jessica Widdifield
Sasha Bernatsky
J Michael Paterson
Karen Tu
Ryan Ng
J Carter Thorne
Janet E Pope
Claire Bombardier
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Oct;65(10):1582-91
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Algorithms
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - epidemiology
Data Mining - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Fees and Charges - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Rheumatology - statistics & numerical data
Single-Payer System - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Health administrative data can be a valuable tool for disease surveillance and research. Few studies have rigorously evaluated the accuracy of administrative databases for identifying rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Our aim was to validate administrative data algorithms to identify RA patients in Ontario, Canada.
We performed a retrospective review of a random sample of 450 patients from 18 rheumatology clinics. Using rheumatologist-reported diagnosis as the reference standard, we tested and validated different combinations of physician billing, hospitalization, and pharmacy data.
One hundred forty-nine rheumatology patients were classified as having RA and 301 were classified as not having RA based on our reference standard definition (study RA prevalence 33%). Overall, algorithms that included physician billings had excellent sensitivity (range 94-100%). Specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) were modest to excellent and increased when algorithms included multiple physician claims or specialist claims. The addition of RA medications did not significantly improve algorithm performance. The algorithm of "(1 hospitalization RA code ever) OR (3 physician RA diagnosis codes [claims] with =1 by a specialist in a 2-year period)" had a sensitivity of 97%, specificity of 85%, PPV of 76%, and negative predictive value of 98%. Most RA patients (84%) had an RA diagnosis code present in the administrative data within ±1 year of a rheumatologist's documented diagnosis date.
We demonstrated that administrative data can be used to identify RA patients with a high degree of accuracy. RA diagnosis date and disease duration are fairly well estimated from administrative data in jurisdictions of universal health care insurance.
PubMed ID
23592598 View in PubMed
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Assessing needs and board rates for handicapped children in foster family care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255968
Source
Child Welfare. 1971 Dec;50(10):588-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1971
Author
C P Shah
Source
Child Welfare. 1971 Dec;50(10):588-92
Date
Dec-1971
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Child Health Services
Disabled Persons
Fees and Charges
Foster Home Care
Humans
Models, Theoretical
PubMed ID
4261517 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing needs and board rates for handicapped children in foster family care: progress report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254065
Source
Child Welfare. 1974 Jan;53(1):31-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1974

Canadian Colloquium on Computer-Assisted Interpretation of Electrocardiograms. I. Review of the present state of automated electrocardiogram interpretation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254636
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1973 May 19;108(10):1230-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-19-1973

Can a public health care system achieve equity? The Norwegian experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35183
Source
Med Care. 1995 Sep;33(9):938-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995
Author
J. Grytten
G. Rongen
R. Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Dentistry, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Med Care. 1995 Sep;33(9):938-51
Date
Sep-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Fees and Charges
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Health status
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
National Health Programs - organization & administration - standards
Norway
Physicians - supply & distribution
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Justice
Time Factors
Travel
Abstract
Equity in health care provision is an important policy goal in Norway. This article addresses equality in the services provided by primary care physicians. These services are the responsibility of local government financed mainly through public funding. Patient fees are low. The local government system results in geographical variation in the number of physicians relative to local health demands. The authors present the hypothesis that this generates inequalities in health care utilization. The system of government finance is based on the assumption that utilization of health services is independent of patient income. Therefore, variation in income is expected to have only a small impact on utilization. The authors estimate a demand model by combining extensive micro data with aggregate data on municipal supply. There is very little relationship between indicators of access and health care utilization. The estimated income elasticities approximate zero, supporting the argument that equality in utilization has been achieved. However, the authors results also raise the question of whether equality has been achieved at the cost of limiting supply of services for people who could afford to consume more, or to pay for services of higher quality.
PubMed ID
7666707 View in PubMed
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129 records – page 1 of 13.