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Dietary patterns of women aged 50-69 years and associations with nutrient intake, sociodemographic factors and key risk factors for non-communicable diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290911
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2016 08; 19(11):2024-32
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2016
Author
Marianne S Markussen
Marit B Veierød
Anne Lene Kristiansen
Giske Ursin
Lene F Andersen
Author Affiliation
1Institute of Basic Medical Sciences,Department of Nutrition,University of Oslo,Blindern,Oslo,Norway.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2016 08; 19(11):2024-32
Date
08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Noncommunicable Diseases - epidemiology
Norway
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
In women, the risk for non-communicable diseases increases after menopause. We aimed to identify major dietary patterns and study their associations with nutrient intake, sociodemographic factors and risk factors for non-communicable diseases among women aged 50-69 years.
A cross-sectional study. Food intake was recorded by a 253-item FFQ. Dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis. The associations between the dietary patterns and nutrients were described by Pearson's correlation coefficients and multiple regression analysis was used to examine the associations between the dietary patterns and age, education, BMI, physical activity and smoking.
The Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Programme.
Women (n 6298) aged 50-69 years.
Three dietary patterns were identified: 'Prudent', 'Western' and 'Continental'. Adherence to the 'Prudent' pattern was related to older age, higher education, higher BMI, more physical activity (P trend
PubMed ID
26780977 View in PubMed
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Eating location is associated with the nutritional quality of the diet in Norwegian adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257680
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Apr;17(4):915-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Jannicke B Myhre
Elin B Løken
Margareta Wandel
Lene F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute for Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, PO Box 1046 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Apr;17(4):915-23
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Beverages
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Fast Foods
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Meals
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Norway
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritive Value
Restaurants
Young Adult
Abstract
To study the association between dinner eating location and the nutritional quality of the specific dinner meal and the whole-day dietary intake and to compare the diets of those consuming =25% of energy out of home and at school/work (SOH; substantial out-of-home eaters) with those consuming
PubMed ID
23481490 View in PubMed
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The effect of under-reporting of energy intake on dietary patterns and on the associations between dietary patterns and self-reported chronic disease in women aged 50-69 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282672
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Aug;116(3):547-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Marianne S Markussen
Marit B Veierød
Giske Ursin
Lene F Andersen
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Aug;116(3):547-58
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Basal Metabolism
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes mellitus
Diet
Diet Records
Energy intake
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Norway
Self Report
Abstract
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate whether under-reporting of energy intake affects derived dietary patterns and the association between dietary patterns and self-reported chronic disease. Diets of 6204 women aged 50-69 years participating in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program were assessed using a 253-item FFQ. We identified dietary patterns using principal component analysis. According to the revised Goldberg cut-off method, women with a ratio of reported energy intake:estimated BMR
PubMed ID
27265399 View in PubMed
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New Iodine Food Composition Database and Updated Calculations of Iodine Intake among Norwegians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295678
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Jul 20; 10(7):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-20-2018
Author
Monica H Carlsen
Lene F Andersen
Lisbeth Dahl
Nina Norberg
Anette Hjartåker
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, 0372 Oslo, Norway. m.h.carlsen@medisin.uio.no.
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Jul 20; 10(7):
Date
Jul-20-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Beverages - analysis
Databases, Factual
Diet
Diet Surveys
Feeding Behavior
Female
Food analysis
Humans
Iodine - administration & dosage - analysis - deficiency
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Trace Elements - administration & dosage - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Iodine food composition data of Norwegian foods have been sparse and knowledge about different dietary iodine sources limited. We compiled a comprehensive iodine food composition database and estimated dietary iodine intake among adults in the latest Norwegian national dietary survey (Norkost 3). The iodine content of food and beverages were compiled using international guidelines and standards. Iodine content of 3259 food items were compiled, including analytical values, values from other food composition databases, estimated values, and values that were based on recipes. Estimated iodine intake in the Norkost 3 population ranged from 15 to 1462 µg/day. Men had significantly higher intake of iodine than women (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
30037013 View in PubMed
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