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601 records – page 1 of 61.

Acoustically invisible feeding blue whales in Northern Icelandic waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267088
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Aug;136(2):939-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Tomonari Akamatsu
Marianne Helene Rasmussen
Maria Iversen
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Aug;136(2):939-44
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics - instrumentation
Animals
Balaenoptera - physiology - psychology
Equipment Design
Feeding Behavior
Iceland
Oceans and Seas
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Sound Spectrography
Time Factors
Transducers, Pressure
Vocalization, Animal
Abstract
Fixed passive acoustic monitoring can be used for long-term recording of vocalizing cetaceans. Both presence monitoring and animal density estimation requires the call rates and sound source levels of vocalizations produced by single animals. In this study, blue whale calls were recorded using acoustic bio-logging systems in Skjálfandi Bay off Húsavík, Northeast Iceland, in June 2012. An accelerometer was attached to individual whales to monitor diving behavior. During 21?h recording two individuals, 8?h 45?min and 13?h 2?min, respectively, 105 and 104 lunge feeding events and four calls were recorded. All recorded calls were down-sweep calls ranging from 105 to 48?Hz. The sound duration was 1-2?s. The source level was estimated to be between 158 and 169?dB re 1µPa rms, assuming spherical sound propagation from the possible sound source location to the tag. The observed sound production rates and source levels of individual blue whales during feeding were extremely small compared with those observed previously in breeding grounds. The feeding whales were nearly acoustically invisible. The function of calls during feeding remains unknown.
PubMed ID
25096128 View in PubMed
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Action schools! BC--Healthy Eating: effects of a whole-school model to modifying eating behaviours of elementary school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155339
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Jul-Aug;99(4):328-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
Meghan E Day
Karen S Strange
Heather A McKay
Patti-Jean Naylor
Author Affiliation
School of Physical Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Jul-Aug;99(4):328-31
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Feasibility Studies
Feeding Behavior
Female
Focus Groups
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Obesity - epidemiology
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Social Marketing
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The rate of obesity and associated risk factors in Canadian youth is increasing at an alarming rate. Nutrition plays an important role in weight maintenance. This study reports the effectiveness of Action Schools! BC---Healthy Eating, a school-based fruit and vegetable (FV) intervention, in effecting change in: 1) students' intake of FV, 2) students' knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding FV, and 3) students' willingness to try new FV.
Five schools that represented geographic, socio-economic and size variation were recruited as Action Schools! BC--Healthy Eating intervention schools. A second set of five schools were selected as matched healthy eating usual practice schools. Student outcomes were measured at baseline and at 12-week follow-up using self-report questionnaires. Classroom logs and progress reports were used to assess implementation dose and fidelity. The intervention included school-wide activities based on individualized Action Plans addressing goals across six Action Zones.
Significant differences were found between conditions over time while controlling for baseline levels. Fruit servings, FV servings, FV variety, and percent of FV tried from a fixed list increased in intervention schools. Teachers implemented a mean of 64% of requested classroom dose, and school Action Teams implemented activities across 80% of the whole-school model.
A whole-school framework can impact FV intake, but results were modest due to implementation issues. Further implementation and evaluation are necessary to fully understand the effectiveness of this initiative.
PubMed ID
18767281 View in PubMed
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Activity budgets and activity rhythms in red ruffed lemurs (Varecia rubra) on the Masoala Peninsula, Madagascar: seasonality and reproductive energetics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95795
Source
Am J Primatol. 2005 May;66(1):23-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Vasey Natalie
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon 97207-0751, USA. nvasey@pdx.edu
Source
Am J Primatol. 2005 May;66(1):23-44
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activity Cycles - physiology
Animals
Ecosystem
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Lemuridae - physiology
Madagascar
Motor Activity - physiology
Observation
Reproduction - physiology
Seasons
Sex Factors
Abstract
The activity budgets and daily activity rhythms of Varecia rubra were examined over an annual cycle according to season and reproductive stage. Given the relatively high reproductive costs and patchy food resources of this species, I predicted that V. rubra would 1) travel less and feed more during seasonal resource scarcity in an attempt to maintain energy balance, and 2) show sex differences in activity budgets due to differing reproductive investment. Contrary to the first prediction, V. rubra does not increase feeding time during seasonal food scarcity; rather, females feed for a consistent amount of time in every season, whereas males feed most during the resource-rich, hot dry season. The results are consistent with other predictions: V. rubra travels less in the resource-scarce cold rainy season, and there are some pronounced sex differences, with females feeding more and resting less than males in every season and in every reproductive stage except gestation. However, there are also some provocative similarities between the sexes when activity budgets are examined by reproductive stage. During gestation, female and male activity budgets do not differ and appear geared toward energy accumulation: both sexes feed and rest extensively and travel least during this stage. During lactation, activity budgets are geared toward high energy expenditure: both sexes travel most and in equal measure, and rest least, although it remains the case that females feed more and rest less than males. These similarities between female and male activity budgets appear related to cooperative infant care. The high energetic costs of reproduction in V. rubra females may require that they allot more time to feeding year round, and that their overall activity budget be more directly responsive to seasonal climate change, seasonal food distribution, and reproductive schedules.
Notes
Erratum In: Am J Primatol. 2005 Aug;66(4):393-4
PubMed ID
15898071 View in PubMed
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Adolescent impulsivity and soft drink consumption: The role of parental regulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277047
Source
Appetite. 2016 Jan 1;96:432-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2016
Author
Elisabeth L Melbye
Ingunn H Bergh
Solveig E S Hausken
Ester F C Sleddens
Kari Glavin
Nanna Lien
Mona Bjelland
Source
Appetite. 2016 Jan 1;96:432-42
Date
Jan-1-2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Carbonated Beverages
Cross-Sectional Studies
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Impulsive Behavior
Linear Models
Male
Norway
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The present study aimed to explore the process in which impulsivity might influence soft drink consumption in adolescents, addressing potential mediating effects of perceived parental regulation regarding unhealthy eating. A cross-sectional survey was performed among 440 13-15-year-olds in Eastern Norway. The survey questionnaire included measures of impulsivity, six types of maternal and paternal regulation (as perceived by the adolescents), and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB). Parallel multiple-mediator analyses were performed to reveal potential mediating effects of perceived parental regulatory behaviors on the association between adolescent impulsivity and SSB consumption. Separate models were run for maternal and paternal regulation. Results from our model analyses (both maternal and paternal models) indicated that all the six measured parental regulatory behaviors jointly acted as mediators on the association between adolescent impulsivity and SSB consumption. However, only perceived maternal and paternal legitimacy of regulation showed a unique contribution to the mediated effect. This finding suggests that adolescents' perception of parental legitimate authority is of particular importance in explaining the relationship between impulsivity and unhealthy eating behaviors in adolescents. Future nutrition interventions targeting adolescents and their parents should take personal factors such as adolescents' level of impulsivity into account. Ultimately; what may be an appropriate approach to impulsive individuals and their parents may diverge from what may be an appropriate approach to less impulsive individuals and their parents.
PubMed ID
26456410 View in PubMed
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Adults only. Reindeer hunting at the middle palaeolithic site salzgitter lebenstedt, northern Germany.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199198
Source
J Hum Evol. 2000 Apr;38(4):497-521
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
S. Gaudzinski
W. Roebroeks
Author Affiliation
Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum Mainz, Forschungsbereich Altsteinzeit, Schloss Monrepos, Neuwied, 56567, Germany. S.Gaudzinski@rz-online.de
Source
J Hum Evol. 2000 Apr;38(4):497-521
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Bone Density
Bone and Bones - anatomy & histology
Feeding Behavior
Germany
Hominidae
Humans
Mammals - anatomy & histology
Paleontology - methods
Reindeer - anatomy & histology
Abstract
The Middle Palaeolithic site Salzgitter Lebenstedt (northern Germany), excavated in 1952, is well known because of its well-preserved faunal remains, dominated by adult reindeer (Rangifer tarandus). The archaeological assemblage accumulated in an arctic setting in an earlier part of the last (Weichsel) glacial (OIS5-3). The site is remarkable because of the presence of unique Middle Palaeolithic bone tools and the occurrence of the northernmost Neanderthal remains, but this paper focuses on an analysis of its reindeer assemblage. The results indicate autumn hunting of reindeer by Middle Palaeolithic hominids. After the hunt, carcasses were butchered and in subsequent marrow processing of the bones a selection against young and sub-adult animals occurred. Adults were clearly preferred, and from their bones, again, poorer marrow bones were neglected. This focus on primeness of resources has been documented in other domains of Neanderthal behaviour, but Salzgitter Lebenstedt is the best example yet known in terms of systematic and routinized processing of game. The Salzgitter Lebenstedt assemblage displays some remarkable similarities to the Late Glacial reindeer assemblages from the Ahrensburg tunnel valley sites. The subsequent review of the evidence on subsistence strategies from earlier periods of the European Palaeolithic shows that hunting of large mammals may have been a part of the behavioural repertoire of the Middle Pleistocene occupants of Europe from the earliest occupation onwards. At the same time, it is suggested that these early hunting strategies were incorporated in ways of moving through landscapes ("settlement systems") which were different from what we know from the middle parts of the Upper Palaeolithic onwards.
Notes
Comment In: J Hum Evol. 2003 Feb;44(2):263-73; author reply 275-8112669705
PubMed ID
10715194 View in PubMed
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Aerobic fitness is associated with low cardiovascular disease risk: the impact of lifestyle on early risk factors for atherosclerosis in young healthy Swedish individuals - the Lifestyle, Biomarker, and Atherosclerosis study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284719
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2017;13:91-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Maria Fernström
Ulrika Fernberg
Gabriella Eliason
Anita Hurtig-Wennlöf
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2017;13:91-99
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Biomarkers - blood
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Carotid Artery Diseases - blood - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - prevention & control
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dyslipidemias - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Exercise Test
Feeding Behavior
Hand Strength
Healthy Diet
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Muscle strength
Prevalence
Prognosis
Protective factors
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and atherosclerosis is slow and develops over decades. In the cross-sectional Swedish Lifestyle, Biomarker, and Atherosclerosis study, 834 young, self-reported healthy adults aged 18.0-25.9 years have been studied to identify early risk factors for atherosclerosis.
The aims of this study were to 1) assess selected cardiometabolic biomarkers, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) as a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, and lifestyle-related indicators (food habits, handgrip strength, and oxygen uptake, VO2 max); 2) analyze the associations between cIMT and lifestyle factors; and 3) identify subjects at risk of CVD using a risk score and to compare the characteristics of subjects with and without risk of CVD.
Blood samples were taken in a fasting state, and food habits were reported through a questionnaire. cIMT was measured by ultrasound, and VO2 max was measured by ergometer bike test. The risk score was calculated according to Wildman.
cIMT (mean ± standard deviation) was 0.50±0.06 mm, and VO2 max values were 37.8±8.5 and 42.9±9.9 mL/kg/min, in women and men, respectively. No correlation was found between aerobic fitness expressed as VO2 max (mL/kg/min) and cIMT. Using Wildman's definition, 12% of the subjects were classified as being at risk of CVD, and 15% had homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. A total of 35% of women and 25% of men had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol than recommended. Food habits did not differ between those at risk and those not at risk. However, aerobic fitness measured as VO2 max (mL/kg/min) differed; 47% of the subjects at risk had low aerobic fitness compared to 23% of the nonrisk subjects (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
28352184 View in PubMed
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After-school snack intake among Canadian children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114423
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Nov-Dec;103(6):e448-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jo-Anne Gilbert
Doris Miller
Shannon Olson
Sylvie St-Pierre
Author Affiliation
Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON. jo-anne.gilbert@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Nov-Dec;103(6):e448-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Meals
Nutritive Value
Snacks - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
The article describes the after-school (AS) snacking pattern of young Canadians and its relationship with the amount of energy consumed daily and at dinner.
We analyzed cross-sectional dietary data, measured by 24h recall, from 9,131 children and adolescents aged 4 to 18 years from the Canadian Community Health Survey, cycle 2.2 (2004). We evaluated AS snack intake; i.e., foods consumed Monday to Friday between 3:00 and 6:00 pm, excluding lunch and dinner. We also assessed the consumption frequency of AS snack items, the energy provided by AS snacks and total daily energy intake (TDEI) by age group and sex.
Approximately 63% of respondents consumed AS snacks. AS snacks provided on average 1212[95%CI,1157-1268] kJ (290[95%CI,276-303] kcal), representing 13[95%CI,12-13]% of TDEI. Youth who consumed AS snacks contributing 1-418 kJ (1-99 kcal) reported lower TDEI than those who consumed no snack. Among AS snack consumers, TDEI was higher in groups consuming the highest amount of energy from AS snacks. Fruits were among the most frequently consumed food categories. However, the largest energy contributors were mostly foods that may be energy-dense and nutrient-poor, such as cookies, sugar-sweetened beverages and sweets.
Considering that the majority of children and adolescents consumed AS snacks, that these snacks provided about 13% of their TDEI, and that the majority of the most frequently consumed snacks were generally energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods, the AS time period presents an opportunity to promote healthy eating in order to improve diet quality and potentially influence TDEI among Canadian children and adolescents.
PubMed ID
23618026 View in PubMed
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Alaska fish adjust to climate change by following the food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266474
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Feb 15;91(1):11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2015
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Feb 15;91(1):11
Date
Feb-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Climate change
Feeding Behavior
Fishes - physiology
PubMed ID
25806382 View in PubMed
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[Alimentation dependent health disorders among adult population of Bashkortostan Republic and their relation with nutritional traits].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156420
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2008;(5):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
R M Takaev
N S Kondrova
I M Baikina
T K Larionova
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2008;(5):15-9
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bashkiria - epidemiology
Feeding Behavior
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Disorders - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The authors demonstrated relationship between alimentation dependent diseases among adult population of the Republic and nutritional traits of the population, defined major directions of program to optimize nutrition of the population.
PubMed ID
18589724 View in PubMed
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601 records – page 1 of 61.