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The 2009 H1N1 pandemic response in remote First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario: barriers and improvements from a health care services perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130157
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. ncharani@uwaterloo.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Catchment Area (Health)
Federal Government
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Information Dissemination
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pandemics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Professional-Patient Relations
Retrospective Studies
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
To retrospectively examine the barriers faced and opportunities for improvement during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic response experienced by participants responsible for the delivery of health care services in 3 remote and isolated Subarctic First Nation communities of northern Ontario, Canada.
A qualitative community-based participatory approach.
Semi-directed interviews were conducted with adult key informants (n=13) using purposive sampling of participants representing the 3 main sectors responsible for health care services (i.e., federal health centres, provincial hospitals and Band Councils). Data were manually transcribed and coded using deductive and inductive thematic analysis.
Primary barriers reported were issues with overcrowding in houses, insufficient human resources and inadequate community awareness. Main areas for improvement included increasing human resources (i.e., nurses and trained health care professionals), funding for supplies and general community awareness regarding disease processes and prevention.
Government bodies should consider focusing efforts to provide more support in terms of human resources, monies and education. In addition, various government organizations should collaborate to improve housing conditions and timely access to resources. These recommendations should be addressed in future pandemic plans, so that remote western James Bay First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario and other similar communities can be better prepared for the next public health emergency.
PubMed ID
22030007 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal health programming under siege, critics charge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120994
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Oct 2;184(14):E739-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2-2012
Author
Paul Christopher Webster
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Oct 2;184(14):E739-40
Date
Oct-2-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Federal Government
Financial Management - economics
Health Services Research - economics
Health Services, Indigenous - economics
Humans
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 2012 Oct 16;184(15):1715-6; author reply 171623073677
PubMed ID
22949561 View in PubMed
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Adrift from the moorings of good public policy: ignoring evidence and human rights.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157650
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Jun;19(3):229-30; discussion 233-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Richard Elliott
Author Affiliation
Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network, 600-1240 Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5R 2A7. relliott@aidslaw.ca
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Jun;19(3):229-30; discussion 233-4
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Federal Government
Health Policy
Human Rights
Humans
Street Drugs
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - methods
Substance Abuse, Intravenous
Notes
Comment On: Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Jun;19(3):220-518551754
PubMed ID
18424110 View in PubMed
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Alaska's approach to planning an emergency medical service system: how is it working three years later?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76569
Source
Pages 373-376 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
in arctic areas faced with similar tasks. While the political contexts are different, the geographic factors dictating these approaches are the same, as are other practical considerations. Role of the Federal Government In the United States, little national attention was given to improving
  1 document  
Author
Way, G. H.
Johnson, M. S.
Author Affiliation
Emergency Medical Services Section, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Juneau, Alaska
Source
Pages 373-376 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Date
1985
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska State Health Plan
EMS
Federal Government
Infrastructure
Regional centers
Sub-regional centers
Urban centers
Villages
Documents
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Alternatives for protecting privacy while respecting patient care and public health needs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80584
Source
Ethics Inf Technol. 1999;1(4):249-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
DeCew J W
Author Affiliation
Clark University, Worcester, MA, USA.
Source
Ethics Inf Technol. 1999;1(4):249-55
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Databases, Factual
European Union
Federal Government
Germany
Government Regulation
Guidelines
Humans
Informed consent
Internet
Medical Records
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Models, organizational
Negotiating
Privacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Private Sector
Public Policy
Security Measures
Social Control, Informal
Sweden
United States
Abstract
This paper begins with a discussion of the value of privacy, especially for medical records in an age of advancing technology. I then examine three alternative approaches to protection of medical records: reliance on governmental guidelines, the use of corporate self-regulation, and my own third hybrid view on how to maintain a presumption in favor of privacy with respect to medical information, safeguarding privacy as vigorously and comprehensively as possible, without sacrificing the benefits of new information technology in medicine. None of the three models I examine are unproblematic, yet it is crucial to weigh the strengths and weaknesses of these alternative approaches.
PubMed ID
16986224 View in PubMed
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Beyond Roe, after Casey: the present and future of a "fundamental" right.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4581
Source
Womens Health Issues. 1993;3(3):162-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
J. Benshoof
Author Affiliation
Center for Reproductive Law & Policy, New York, NY.
Source
Womens Health Issues. 1993;3(3):162-70
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal
Federal Government
Female
Forecasting
Government Regulation
Humans
Judicial Role
Minors
Parental Consent
Parental Notification
Personal Autonomy
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Supreme Court Decisions
United States
Vulnerable Populations
Women's Rights - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Abstract
Although the US Supreme Court recently reaffirmed a woman's right to end a pregnancy before viability, many women remain unable to exercise that right because their access to abortion is limited. 83% of the counties in the nation have no abortion providers, and many women must travel hundreds of miles to obtain an abortion. In its Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania vs. Casey decision, the Supreme Court upheld what it felt were the central tenets of Roe vs. Wade but appointed an "undue burden" standard instead of a "strict scrutiny" standard for the courts to use when determining whether or not a state restriction is to be allowed. This means that women must prove "undue" harm from a restriction. 2 other new concepts contained in Casey are that the state has an interest in fetal life throughout a pregnancy and that the government does not have to remain neutral in an abortion case even if it did not involve the issue of funding. This means that states can try to discourage a woman's choice to have an abortion. Since Casey, the Supreme Court has refused to review several abortion cases and federal courts have taken action allowing abortion restrictions to go into effect in Pennsylvania, Utah, South Dakota, North Dakota, and Mississippi. State courts in Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Alaska, New York, and West Virginia have also heard abortion restriction cases in the past year. These restrictions involved a waiting period, criminalization, a residency requirement, a community hospital's ban on abortions, and state funding for abortion. Following the Casey decision, efforts were made to codify Roe by reintroducing the Freedom of Choice Act in Congress. During the committee process, however, the bill was amended in such a way as to make pro-choice advocates doubt that the amended version will be able to accomplish the aims of the original Act. Because the High Court ruled in Bray vs. Alexandria Women's Health Clinic that the ability of abortion clinics to prevent antichoice blockades is limited since the blockades do not violate civil rights laws, Congress is advancing a measure called "The Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act" to counteract the harassment which occurs outside of the clinics. State legislatures have taken action to impose mandatory delays and biased counseling on abortion-seekers, restrict the access of young women to abortion, prohibit Medicaid funding for abortion, require unnecessary reporting regulations on the part of abortion services, and institute protective measures for reproductive rights. Although the right acknowledged in the Roe vs. Wade decision continues to exist, the struggle for women's reproductive autonomy must go forward to assure constitutional protection for the right to choose and guaranteed access to that right for all women.
PubMed ID
8274872 View in PubMed
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143 records – page 1 of 15.