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193 records – page 1 of 20.

[A Danish intestinal pseudomyiasis case caused by Eristalis tenax]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95052
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Sep 28;171(40):2922-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-28-2009
Author
Rathe Mathias
Ozeraityte Aiste
Author Affiliation
Klinisk Mikrobiologisk Afdeling, Regionshospitalet Herning, Gl. landevej 61, DK-7400 Herning, Denmark. marat@ringamt.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Sep 28;171(40):2922-3
Date
Sep-28-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - diagnosis - parasitology
Animals
Child
Diagnosis, Differential
Diptera
Feces - parasitology
Humans
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic - parasitology
Larva
Male
Myiasis - parasitology
Rats
Abstract
Intestinal pseudomyiasis caused by the larvae of the drone fly Eristalis tenax is sporadically reported and symptoms are varying. We report a ten-year-old boy with intermittent nonspecific abdominal pain. He noticed a larva in his stools which was later identified as the rat-tailed larva of Eristalis tenax. After passing the larva his symptoms subsided. No treatment was given. We aim to register the first case of human pseudomyaisis caused by E. tenax in Denmark.
PubMed ID
19814944 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent occurrence of the intestinal ciliate Balantidium coli in pigs at a Danish research farm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63919
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2000;41(1):79-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
O. Hindsbo
C V Nielsen
J. Andreassen
A L Willingham
M. Bendixen
M A Nielsen
N O Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Ecology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. ohindsbo@zi.ku.dk
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2000;41(1):79-83
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Animals, Suckling
Balantidiasis - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Balantidium - isolation & purification
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Feces - parasitology
Female
Lactation
Parasite Egg Count - veterinary
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Parasitic - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Prevalence
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Statistics, nonparametric
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Abstract
A cross sectional study of the prevalence and intensity of Balantidium coli in pigs was carried out on a Danish research farm. The prevalence of B. coli infection increased from 57% in suckling piglets to 100% in most pig groups > or = 4 weeks old. The mean number of cysts per gram faeces (CPG) of pigs aged 12 weeks and younger were 52 weeks had significantly higher counts of > or = 865 CPG. Although some lactating sows had very high CPG's, no significant differences in CPG could be detected between the intensities of pregnant sows, lactating sows and empty and dry sows. No human cases of B. coli infection have been published in Denmark though it is zoonotic.
PubMed ID
10920478 View in PubMed
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[A LOCAL CASE OF CHRONIC STRONGYLOIDIASIS IN THE VOLGOGRAD REGION].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270391
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2015 Oct-Dec;(4):39-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
T F Boruk
G L Plyushcheva
O P Zelya
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2015 Oct-Dec;(4):39-40
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Feces - parasitology
Female
Humans
Larva - pathogenicity
Middle Aged
Russia
Sputum - parasitology
Strongyloides stercoralis - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Strongyloidiasis - parasitology - physiopathology - urine
Abstract
The paper describes a case of disseminated strongyloidosis in a 52-year-old woman living in Volgograd. Filariform and. rhabditiform larvae of the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis were found when analyzing her urine, sputum, and feces. She had been followed up and treated for duodenal ulcer for more than 15 years. During that time, the patient periodically underwent radiographic and ultrasonic studies and clinical and biochemical blood tests. Fecal tests were not been carried out. This case could convince that there was a risk for human strongyloidosis in the arid region having a temperate climate in European Russia and when timely detection of invasion and specific treatment were not performed, there might be disseminated strongyloidosis. The reason for late diagnosis was epidemiological history (possible contact with soil) underestimation and improper-patient examination.
PubMed ID
26827587 View in PubMed
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Amoebiasis in a non-endemic country. Epidemiology, presenting symptoms and diagnostic methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40267
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1983;15(2):207-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
P O Pehrson
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1983;15(2):207-14
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Amebiasis - epidemiology
Carrier State - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnosis, Differential
Diarrhea - diagnosis - etiology
Entamoeba histolytica - isolation & purification
Entamoebiasis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Europe
Feces - parasitology
Female
Humans
Infant
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic - diagnosis
Liver Abscess, Amebic - diagnosis
Male
Middle Aged
Parasite Egg Count - methods
Retrospective Studies
Sigmoidoscopy
Sweden
Travel
Abstract
392 patients with amoebiasis, diagnosed at Roslagstull Hospital, Stockholm during 10 yr, are reviewed. The disease is increasing in frequency, due both to increased travelling by Swedish citizens and immigration from non-European countries. The risk for an ordinary charter tourist is, however, rather low. Two-thirds of the patients were symptomatic and one-third were regarded as asymptomatic cyst carriers. The importance of repeated examination of stool samples and examinations using different techniques, especially direct microscopy of fresh faeces, is pointed out. The latter technique is in our laboratory shown to be as efficient in cases with no diarrhoea as in those with diarrhoea, with trophozoites demonstrated in the same frequency in both groups. Sigmoidoscopy with scrapings was seldom of diagnostic value.
PubMed ID
6308756 View in PubMed
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An attempt to evaluate the spreading of Taenia saginata eggs in the environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233899
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 1988;29(3-4):511-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988

An outbreak of cryptosporidiosis at a day-care centre in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83794
Source
Euro Surveill. 2007 Aug;12(8):E070823.3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Persson K.
Svenungsson B.
de Jong B.
Author Affiliation
Department of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Stockholm Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2007 Aug;12(8):E070823.3
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Day Care Centers - statistics & numerical data
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology
Diarrhea - epidemiology - parasitology
Disease Outbreaks
Feces - parasitology
Humans
Sweden - epidemiology
Swimming Pools
PubMed ID
17868622 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of gastroenteritis among schoolchildren staying in a wildlife reserve: thorough investigation reveals Norway's largest cryptosporidiosis outbreak.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137050
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):287-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Gražina Rimšeliene
Line Vold
Lucy Robertson
Christian Nelke
Kjersti Søli
Øystein Haarklau Johansen
Frank S Thrana
Karin Nygård
Author Affiliation
European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Stockholm, Sweden. Grazina.Rimseliene@fhi.no
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):287-95
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Animals, Wild - parasitology
Child
Cohort Studies
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission
Cryptosporidium parvum - isolation & purification
Feces - parasitology
Female
Food Microbiology
Food Parasitology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - parasitology
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oocysts - parasitology
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Water Microbiology
Abstract
In March and April 2009, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health was notified about two groups of schoolchildren with gastroenteritis following a stay at a Norwegian wildlife reserve. Although at first considered a typical norovirus outbreak, an investigation that considered other possibilities was initiated.
A retrospective cohort study was conducted among schoolchildren visiting the reserve in the relevant weeks. A web-based questionnaire was distributed by email. Faecal samples of visitors and employees were analysed. The premises were inspected, and water samples and animal faeces analysed.
We received 141 replies (response rate 84%); 74 cases were identified. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in faecal samples from 9/12 (75%) visitors and 2/15 (13%) employees. One employee diagnosed with Cryptosporidium infection helped in the kitchen. Additionally, one pupil was diagnosed with norovirus infection. No food item was identified as a source of the outbreak. Pathogens were not detected in water samples taken in week 12, one week from the start of the outbreak. Escherichia coli, but not Cryptosporidium oocysts, were detected in water samples taken one month later.
Although Cryptosporidium is seldom considered as an aetiological agent of gastrointestinal illness in Norway, this outbreak indicates that it should not be excluded. In this cryptosporidiosis outbreak, the largest in Norway to date, the transmission vehicle was not definitively identified, but a food handler, water, and animal contact could not be excluded. We recommend improving hand hygiene routines, boiling drinking water, and emphasise that people who are unwell, particularly those working in catering, should stay away from work.
PubMed ID
21321048 View in PubMed
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193 records – page 1 of 20.