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An anthroposophic lifestyle and intestinal microflora in infancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31230
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2002 Dec;13(6):402-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Johan S Alm
Jackie Swartz
Bengt Björkstén
Lars Engstrand
Johan Engström
Inger Kühn
Gunnar Lilja
Roland Möllby
Elisabeth Norin
Göran Pershagen
Claudia Reinders
Karin Wreiber
Annika Scheynius
Author Affiliation
Sachs' Children's Clinic, Söder Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Johan.Alm@sos.ki.se
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2002 Dec;13(6):402-11
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anthroposophy - psychology
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Colony Count, Microbial
Comparative Study
Family Health
Feces - chemistry - microbiology
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - diagnosis - microbiology - therapy
Infant
Infant Food - microbiology
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Intestines - microbiology
Life Style
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The intestinal flora is considered to have an impact on the development of the immune system. In the anthroposophic lifestyle, a diet comprising vegetables spontaneously fermented by lactobacilli, and a restrictive use of antibiotics, anti-pyretics and vaccinations, is typical. The aim of this study was to assess the gut flora in infants in relation to certain lifestyle characteristics associated with anthroposophy. Sixty-nine children
PubMed ID
12485315 View in PubMed
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Caffeine in wastewater is a tracer for human fecal contamination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126536
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Mar;120(3):A108-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Carol Potera
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Mar;120(3):A108-9
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caffeine - analysis - isolation & purification
Carbamazepine - analysis - isolation & purification
Enterobacteriaceae - isolation & purification - physiology
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Feces - chemistry - microbiology
Humans
Quebec
Water - chemistry
Water Microbiology
Water Pollution
Notes
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Dec;119(12):A514-922133540
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Jun;115(6):856-6417589591
Cites: MMWR Surveill Summ. 2008 Sep 12;57(9):39-6218784643
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Jan;105(1):110-315635355
Cites: Chemosphere. 2012 Jan;86(2):118-2322075053
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2009 Mar;157(3):994-100219038482
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Feb;120(2):192-722030231
PubMed ID
22382130 View in PubMed
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Diagnostic trends in Clostridium difficile detection in Finnish microbiology laboratories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149761
Source
Anaerobe. 2009 Dec;15(6):261-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Eija Könönen
Marja Rasinperä
Anni Virolainen
Silja Mentula
Outi Lyytikäinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), PO Box 30, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland. eija.kononen@thl.fi
Source
Anaerobe. 2009 Dec;15(6):261-5
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Proteins - analysis - genetics
Bacterial Toxins - analysis - genetics
Bacteriological Techniques
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - statistics & numerical data - trends
Clostridium Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Clostridium difficile - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Culture Media
Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous - diagnosis - microbiology
Enterotoxins - analysis - genetics
Feces - chemistry - microbiology
Finland
Humans
Microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Questionnaires
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Abstract
Due to increased interest directed to Clostridium difficile-associated infections, a questionnaire survey of laboratory diagnostics of toxin-producing C. difficile was conducted in Finland in June 2006. Different aspects pertaining to C. difficile diagnosis, such as requests and criteria used for testing, methods used for its detection, yearly changes in diagnostics since 1996, and the total number of investigations positive for C. difficile in 2005, were asked in the questionnaire, which was sent to 32 clinical microbiology laboratories, including all hospital-affiliated and the relevant private clinical microbiology laboratories in Finland. The situation was updated by phone and email correspondence in September 2008. In June 2006, 28 (88%) laboratories responded to the questionnaire survey; 24 of them reported routinely testing requested stool specimens for C. difficile. Main laboratory methods included toxin detection (21/24; 88%) and/or anaerobic culture (19/24; 79%). In June 2006, 18 (86%) of the 21 laboratories detecting toxins directly from feces, from the isolate, or both used methods for both toxin A (TcdA) and B (TcdB), whereas only one laboratory did so in 1996. By September 2008, all of the 23 laboratories performing diagnostics for C. difficile used methods for both TcdA and TcdB. In 2006, the number of specimens processed per 100,000 population varied remarkably between different hospital districts. In conclusion, culturing C. difficile is common and there has been a favorable shift in toxin detection practice in Finnish clinical microbiology laboratories. However, the variability in diagnostic activity reported in 2006 creates a challenge for national monitoring of the epidemiology of C. difficile and related diseases.
PubMed ID
19591954 View in PubMed
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Dynamics of fecal microbiota in hospitalized elderly fed probiotic LKM512 yogurt.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149275
Source
Microbiol Immunol. 2009 Aug;53(8):421-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Mitsuharu Matsumoto
Mitsuo Sakamoto
Yoshimi Benno
Author Affiliation
Dairy Science and Technology Institute, Kyodo Milk Industry Co. Ltd., 20-1 Hirai, Hinode, Tokyo 190-0182, Japan. m-matumoto@meito.co.jp
Source
Microbiol Immunol. 2009 Aug;53(8):421-32
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bacteria - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification - metabolism
Biogenic Polyamines - metabolism
Feces - chemistry - microbiology
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Intestines - chemistry - metabolism - microbiology
Male
Probiotics - administration & dosage - analysis
Yogurt - analysis - microbiology
Abstract
The comprehensive dynamics of intestinal microbiota including uncultured bacteria in response to probiotic consumption have not been well studied. The aims of this study were twofold: firstly to analyze the impact on intestinal microbiota of yogurt fermented by Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis LKM512, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus LKM1759, and Streptococcus thermophilus LKM1742 (LKM512 yogurt) and placebo fermented by these lactic acid bacterial strains without LKM512; and secondly to investigate the changes in intestinal microbiota that influence the concentration of PA, one of the beneficial metabolites produced by bacteria in the intestine. The LKM512 yogurt/placebo trial was performed in six hospitalized elderly patients (three men and three women with an average age of 80.3 years) and lasted seven weeks with the following schedule: pre-consumption for one week, LKM512 yogurt consumption for two weeks, washout period for two weeks, and placebo consumption for two weeks. The amount of ingested LKM512 yogurt or placebo was 100 g/day/individual. Fecal samples were analyzed using T-RFLP and real-time PCR. The T-RFLP patterns in five of the six volunteers were changed in a similar fashion by LKM512 yogurt consumption, although these patterns were individually changed following consumption of placebo. It was confirmed that B. animalis subsp. lactis was increased dramatically and Lactobacillus spp. tended to be decreased by LKM512 yogurt consumption. Some indigenous uncultured bacteria were increased and some decreased by LKM512 yogurt/placebo consumption. The similar changes in the intestinal microbiota of the elderly caused by consumption of the LKM512 yogurt were found to be influenced by the LKM512 strain itself, and not by the lactic acid bacteria in the yogurt. Moreover, this study suggests that the increase in intestinal PA concentrations caused by LKM512 yogurt consumption is probably dependent on the LKM512 strain colonizing the intestine.
PubMed ID
19659926 View in PubMed
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Environmental toxicants in breast milk of Norwegian mothers and gut bacteria composition and metabolites in their infants at 1 month.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300900
Source
Microbiome. 2019 02 27; 7(1):34
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-27-2019
Author
Nina Iszatt
Stefan Janssen
Virissa Lenters
Cecilie Dahl
Hein Stigum
Rob Knight
Siddhartha Mandal
Shyamal Peddada
Antonio González
Tore Midtvedt
Merete Eggesbø
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Exposure and Epidemiology, Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 222, Skøyen, 0213, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Microbiome. 2019 02 27; 7(1):34
Date
02-27-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Bacteria - classification - drug effects - genetics
Biodiversity
Cohort Studies
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - genetics
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Fatty Acids, Volatile - analysis
Feces - chemistry - microbiology
Flame Retardants - adverse effects - analysis
Gastrointestinal Microbiome - drug effects
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - adverse effects - analysis
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Metabolomics
Milk, human - chemistry
Norway
Pesticides - adverse effects - analysis
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - adverse effects - analysis
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA - methods
Abstract
Early disruption of the microbial community may influence life-long health. Environmental toxicants can contaminate breast milk and the developing infant gut microbiome is directly exposed. We investigated whether environmental toxicants in breastmilk affect the composition and function of the infant gut microbiome at 1 month. We measured environmental toxicants in breastmilk, fecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), and gut microbial composition from 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing using samples from 267 mother-child pairs in the Norwegian Microbiota Cohort (NoMIC). We tested 28 chemical exposures: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated flame retardants (PBDEs), per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), and organochlorine pesticides. We assessed chemical exposure and alpha diversity/SCFAs using elastic net regression modeling and generalized linear models, adjusting for confounders, and variation in beta diversity (UniFrac), taxa abundance (ANCOM), and predicted metagenomes (PiCRUSt) in low, medium, and high exposed groups.
PBDE-28 and the surfactant perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) were associated with less microbiome diversity. Some sub-OTUs of Lactobacillus, an important genus in early life, were lower in abundance in samples from infants with relative "high" (>?80th percentile) vs. "low" (
PubMed ID
30813950 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of hepatocyte growth factor as a local acute phase response marker in the bowel: the clinical impact of a rapid diagnostic test for immediate identification of acute bowel inflammation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269919
Source
Cytokine. 2015 Jan;71(1):8-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Ashraf E Sorour
Johanna Lönn
Sravya Sowdamini Nakka
Tayeb Nayeri
Fariba Nayeri
Source
Cytokine. 2015 Jan;71(1):8-15
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute-Phase Reaction - diagnosis
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - analysis
Diarrhea - etiology - mortality
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Feces - chemistry - microbiology - parasitology - virology
Female
Gastroenteritis - diagnosis
Hepatocyte Growth Factor - analysis - metabolism
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Polysaccharides - metabolism
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome - diagnosis
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
There are no rapid tests that can distinguish contagious gastroenteritis, which requires isolation at its onset, from exacerbation of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or bowel engagement in the course of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is an acute phase cytokine that is produced at the site of injury. It has high affinity to sulfated glycan, and this binding affinity is lost during chronic inflammation. The fecal pH strongly impacts the prognosis for severe bowel disease. We developed a strip test to evaluate HGF as a local acute phase response marker in the bowel. This test assessed the binding affinity of HGF to sulfated glycans in fecal samples and determined fecal pH as an indicator of illness severity.
Fresh feces from patients with diarrhea (n=513) were collected and tested blindly, and information about patient illness course and outcome was collected. Patients were classified based on the focus of inflammation and the cause of the symptoms. Objectively verified diagnoses of infectious gastroenteritis (n=131) and IBD onset/exacerbation and bowel cancer (n=44) were used to estimate the performance of the test strip. ELISA was performed on 101 freeze-thawed feces samples to determine the fecal HGF levels.
The test rapidly distinguished infectious gastroenteritis from non-infectious inflammatory causes of diarrhea (sensitivity, 87.96%; specificity, 90.9%; positive predictive value, 96.6%; negative predictive value, 71.4%; accuracy, 89.1%). Fecal pH (p
PubMed ID
25174881 View in PubMed
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Fungal Dysbiosis and Intestinal Inflammation in Children With Beta-Cell Autoimmunity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311284
Source
Front Immunol. 2020; 11:468
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2020
Author
Jarno Honkanen
Arja Vuorela
Daniel Muthas
Laura Orivuori
Kristiina Luopajärvi
Mysore Vishakante Gowda Tejesvi
Anton Lavrinienko
Anna Maria Pirttilä
Christopher L Fogarty
Taina Härkönen
Jorma Ilonen
Terhi Ruohtula
Mikael Knip
Janne J Koskimäki
Outi Vaarala
Author Affiliation
Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Front Immunol. 2020; 11:468
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Fungal - blood
Autoantibodies - blood
Autoimmunity
Candida - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - immunology
Dysbiosis
Feces - chemistry - microbiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
HLA-DQ beta-Chains - genetics
Humans
Insulin-Secreting Cells - immunology - pathology
Male
Mycoses - epidemiology - immunology
Saccharomyces - physiology
beta-Defensins - analysis
Abstract
Although gut bacterial dysbiosis is recognized as a regulator of beta-cell autoimmunity, no data is available on fungal dysbiosis in the children at the risk of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We hypothesized that the co-occurrence of fungal and bacterial dysbiosis contributes to the intestinal inflammation and autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing beta-cells in T1D. Fecal and blood samples were collected from 26 children tested positive for at least one diabetes-associated autoantibody (IAA, GADA, IA-2A or ICA) and matched autoantibody-negative children with HLA-conferred susceptibility to T1D (matched for HLA-DQB1 haplotype, age, gender and early childhood nutrition). Bacterial 16S and fungal ITS2 sequencing, and analyses of the markers of intestinal inflammation, namely fecal human beta-defensin-2 (HBD2), calprotectin and secretory total IgA, were performed. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) and circulating cytokines, IFNG, IL-17 and IL-22, were studied. After these analyses, the children were followed for development of clinical T1D (median 8 years and 8 months). Nine autoantibody positive children were diagnosed with T1D, whereas none of the autoantibody negative children developed T1D during the follow-up. Fungal dysbiosis, characterized by high abundance of fecal Saccharomyces and Candida, was found in the progressors, i.e., children with beta-cell autoimmunity who during the follow-up progressed to clinical T1D. These children showed also bacterial dysbiosis, i.e., increased Bacteroidales and Clostridiales ratio, which was, however, found also in the non-progressors, and is thus a common nominator in the children with beta-cell autoimmunity. Furthermore, the progressors showed markers of intestinal inflammation detected as increased levels of fecal HBD2 and ASCA IgG to fungal antigens. We conclude that the fungal and bacterial dysbiosis, and intestinal inflammation are associated with the development of T1D in children with beta-cell autoimmunity.
PubMed ID
32265922 View in PubMed
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Helicobacter pylori antigen in stool is associated with SIDS and sudden infant deaths due to infectious disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93053
Source
Pediatr Res. 2008 Oct;64(4):405-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Stray-Pedersen Arne
Vege Ashild
Rognum Torleiv O
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Oslo, N-0027 Oslo, Norway. arne.stray-pedersen@medisin.uio.no
Source
Pediatr Res. 2008 Oct;64(4):405-10
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Feces - chemistry - microbiology
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Immunoassay
Infant
Interleukin-6 - cerebrospinal fluid
Norway
Statistics, nonparametric
Sudden Infant Death - etiology
Abstract
Infection with Helicobacter pylori has been proposed to be a common cause of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). We investigated the frequency of H. pylori infection in 160 infant deaths and 156 live controls by means of the Helicobacter pylori stool antigen (HpSA) immunoassay. Histology was performed in 26 randomly selected cases. H. pylori antigen was detected in 8% (12/156) of the live controls compared with 25% (30/122) of SIDS cases (p
PubMed ID
18535491 View in PubMed
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High frequency of hybrid Escherichia coli strains with combined Intestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli (IPEC) and Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) virulence factors isolated from human faecal samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297455
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2018 Nov 01; 18(1):544
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-01-2018
Author
Bjørn-Arne Lindstedt
Misti D Finton
Davide Porcellato
Lin T Brandal
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432, Ås, Norway. bjorn-arne.lindstedt@nmbu.no.
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2018 Nov 01; 18(1):544
Date
Nov-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli - genetics - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Escherichia coli Proteins - analysis - genetics - isolation & purification
Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli - genetics - isolation & purification
Feces - chemistry - microbiology
Humans
Incidence
Intestines - microbiology
Meningitis, Escherichia coli - epidemiology - microbiology
Norway - epidemiology
Phylogeny
Uropathogenic Escherichia coli - genetics - isolation & purification
Virulence - genetics
Virulence Factors - analysis - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
Classification of pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) has traditionally relied on detecting specific virulence associated genes (VAGs) or combinations thereof. For E. coli isolated from faecal samples, the presence of specific genes associated with different intestinal pathogenic pathovars will determine their classification and further course of action. However, the E. coli genome is not a static entity, and hybrid strains are emerging that cross the pathovar definitions. Hybrid strains may show gene contents previously associated with several distinct pathovars making the correct diagnostic classification difficult. We extended the analysis of routinely submitted faecal isolates to include known virulence associated genes that are usually not examined in faecal isolates to detect the frequency of possible hybrid strains.
From September 2012 to February 2013, 168 faecal isolates of E. coli routinely submitted to the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH) from clinical microbiological laboratories throughout Norway were analysed for 33 VAGs using multiplex-PCR, including factors associated with extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strains. The strains were further typed by Multiple Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis (MLVA), and the phylogenetic grouping was determined. One isolate from the study was selected for whole genome sequencing (WGS) with a combination of Oxford Nanopore's MinION and Illumina's MiSeq.
The analysis showed a surprisingly high number of strains carrying ExPEC associated VAGs and strains carrying a combination of both intestinal pathogenic E. coli (IPEC) and ExPEC VAGs. In particular, 93.5% (101/108) of isolates classified as belonging to an IPEC pathovar additionally carried ExPEC VAGs. WGS analysis of a selected hybrid strain revealed that it could, with present classification criteria, be classified as belonging to all of the Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), Neonatal meningitis Escherichia coli (NMEC) and Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) pathovars.
Hybrid ExPEC/IPEC E. coli strains were found at a very high frequency in faecal samples and were in fact the predominant species present. A sequenced hybrid isolate was confirmed to be a cross-pathovar strain possessing recognised hallmarks of several pathovars, and a genome heavily influenced by horizontal gene transfer.
PubMed ID
30497396 View in PubMed
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Impact of free verotoxin testing on epidemiology of diarrhea caused by verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215287
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1995 May;33(5):1114-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
K. Ramotar
E. Henderson
R. Szumski
T J Louie
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology-Infectious Diseases, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1995 May;33(5):1114-20
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Bacterial Toxins - analysis - biosynthesis
Child
Child, Preschool
Diarrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Escherichia coli - classification - genetics - metabolism
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Feces - chemistry - microbiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Serotyping
Shiga Toxin 1
Abstract
During a 10-week period in the summer of 1990, an epidemiologic investigation of the prevalence of verotoxin (VT)-producing Escherichia coli infection was conducted in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Consecutive stool specimens (n = 3,577) were cultured for E. coli O157:H7, and fecal filtrates were tested for free VTs (FVTs). E. coli O157:H7 was recovered from 22 specimens (0.6%), but VT was detected in 74 specimens (2.1%). Sixty-nine stool specimens positive for FVTs or E. coli O157:H7 were probed for VT genes by colony blot hybridization; 22 of 38 VT gene probe-positive isolates were non-O157:H7 E. coli organisms. Fourteen of 22 strains could not be induced to produce VT in vitro, despite the presence of FVTs in the stool sample, positivity on colony blot hybridization, positive PCR probes with the primers described by Pollard et al. (D. R. Pollard, W. M. Johnson, H. Lior, S. D. Tyler, and K. R. Rozee, J. Clin. Microbiol. 28:540-545, 1990) or Gannon et al. (V. P. Gannon, R. K. King, J. Y. Kim, and E. J. Golsteyn-Thomas, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:3809-3815, 1992) (but not those described by Karch and Meyer [H. Karch and T. Meyer, J. Clin. Microbiol. 27:2751-2757, 1989]), and positive Southern blot analysis of isolates in 10 of 14 strains. The patient survey questionnaire showed that E. coli O157:H7 infection was associated with bloody diarrhea of short duration, whereas infection with other serotypes or persistence of FVT only was associated with longer-duration nonbloody diarrheal illness. We conclude that (i) detection of FVT in stools enhances the diagnosis of VT infection threefold over cultures for E. coli O157:H7, (ii) cultures for E.coli O157:H7 detect the majority of organisms of that serotype, (iii) the spectrum of disease produced by organisms of non-O157:H7 serotypes may include less severe but more protracted illness, and (iv) differences in the in vivo and in vitro expression of toxin and results of genetic probe studies highlight the need to examine control mechanisms of toxin production.
Notes
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PubMed ID
7615714 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.