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870 records – page 1 of 87.

3D modeling-based surgical planning in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery--preliminary results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90794
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2008 Sep;128(9):1011-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Raappana Antti
Koivukangas John
Pirilä Tapio
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. antti.raappana@oulu.fi
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2008 Sep;128(9):1011-8
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - pathology - radiography - surgery
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Endoscopy - methods
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Neurological
Pituitary Neoplasms - pathology - radiography - surgery
Prospective Studies
Surgery, Computer-Assisted - methods
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Young Adult
Abstract
CONCLUSION: The preoperative three-dimensional (3D) modeling of the pituitary adenoma together with pituitary gland, optic nerves, carotid arteries, and the sphenoid sinuses was adopted for routine use in our institution for all pituitary surgery patients. It gave the surgeon a more profound orientation to the individual surgical field compared with the use of conventional 2D images only. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the feasibility of 3D surgical planning for pituitary adenoma surgery using readily available resources. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of 40 consecutive patients with pituitary adenoma were used to construct 3D models to be used in preoperative planning and during the surgery. A freely available, open source program (3D Slicer) downloaded to a conventional personal computer (PC) was applied. RESULTS: The authors present a brief description of the 3D reconstruction-based surgical planning workflow. In addition to the preoperative planning the 3D model was used as a 'road map' during the operation. With the 3D model the surgeon was more confident when opening the sellar wall and when evacuating the tumor from areas in contact with vital structures than when using only conventional 2D images.
PubMed ID
19086197 View in PubMed
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A 25-year follow-up of a population screened with faecal occult blood test in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161415
Source
Acta Oncol. 2007;46(8):1103-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Nea Malila
Matti Hakama
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Liisankatu 21 B, FI-001 70 Helsinki, Finland. nea.malila@cancer.fi
Source
Acta Oncol. 2007;46(8):1103-6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Feasibility Studies
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Occult Blood
Patient compliance
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility of and possible selection to attend in colorectal cancer screening.
During the years 1979-1980, 1 785 men and women (born in 1917-1929) were invited to a pilot screening project for colorectal cancer. The screening method used was a guaiac-based faecal occult blood test repeated once if the initial test was positive.
Compliance was 69% and the test was positive in 19% of those attending. In a record linkage with the Finnish Cancer Registry, 47 colorectal cancer cases and 24 deaths from colorectal cancer were observed by the end of 2004. In all, the particular test method was not regarded specific enough for population screening. There was, however, no difference in cancer incidence between those who complied and those who did not when compared to the general population of same age and gender.
Compliance was found high enough to make screening feasible and there was no self selection of persons with low cancer risk to attend screening.
PubMed ID
17851857 View in PubMed
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Abdominal aortic and iliac artery compression following penetrating trauma: a study of feasibility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256470
Source
Prehosp Disaster Med. 2014 Jun;29(3):299-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Matthew Douma
Peter George Brindley
Author Affiliation
1Collaborative Program in Resuscitation Science, Faculty of Medicine,University of Toronto,Toronto,Ontario,Canada.
Source
Prehosp Disaster Med. 2014 Jun;29(3):299-302
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - etiology - therapy
Alberta
Aorta, Abdominal - injuries
Body Weight
Clinical Competence
Emergency Treatment - methods
Feasibility Studies
Female
Hemorrhage - etiology - prevention & control
Hemostatic Techniques
Humans
Iliac Artery - injuries
Male
Pressure
Sodium Chloride
Time Factors
Wounds, Penetrating - complications
Abstract
Penetrating junctional trauma is a leading cause of preventable death on the battlefield. Similarly challenging in civilian settings, exsanguination from the vessels of the abdomen, pelvis, and groin can occur in moments. Therefore, iliac artery or abdominal aortic compression has been recommended. Based on prior research, 120 lbs (54 kg) or 140 lbs (63 kg) of compression may be required to occlude these vessels, respectively. Whether most rescuers can generate this amount of compression is unknown.
To determine how many people in a convenience sample of 44 health care professionals can compress 120 lbs and 140 lbs.
This study simulated aortic and iliac artery compression. Consent was obtained from 44 clinicians (27 female; 17 male) from two large urban hospitals in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Participants compressed the abdominal model, which consisted of a medical scale and a 250 ml bag of saline, covered by a folded hospital blanket and placed on the ground. In random order, participants compressed a force they believed maintainable for 20 minutes ("maintainable effort") and then a maximum force they could maintain for two minutes ("maximum effort"). Compression was also performed with a knee. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the data.
Compression was directly proportional to the clinician's body weight. Participants compressed a mean of 55% of their body weight with two hands at a maintainable effort, and 69% at a maximum effort. At maintainable manual effort, participants compressed a mean of 86 lbs (39 kg). Sixteen percent could compress over 120 lbs, but none over 140 lbs. At maximum effort, participants compressed a mean of 108 lbs (48 kg). Thirty-four percent could compress greater than 120 lbs and 11% could compress greater than 140 lbs. Using a single knee, participants compressed a mean weight of 80% of their body weight with no difference between maintainable and maximum effort.
This work suggests that bimanual compression following penetrating junctional trauma is feasible. However, it is difficult, and is not likely achievable or sustainable by a majority of rescuers. Manual compression (used to temporize until device application and operative rescue) requires a large body mass. To maintain 140 lbs of compression (for example during a lengthy transport), participants needed to weigh 255 lbs (115 kg). Alternatively, they needed to weigh 203 lbs (92 kg) to be successful during brief periods. Knee compression may be preferable, especially for lower-weight rescuers.
PubMed ID
24913094 View in PubMed
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Abortion induced with methotrexate and misoprostol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212859
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jan 15;154(2):165-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1996
Author
E R Wiebe
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jan 15;154(2):165-70
Date
Jan-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortifacient Agents, Nonsteroidal - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abortion, Induced - methods
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Methotrexate - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Misoprostol - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To determine the outcome and side effects of a new drug protocol to induce abortion.
Case series.
An urban primary care practice.
One hundred consecutive patients who requested elective termination of pregnancies of less than 8 weeks' gestation.
Subjects received methotrexate (50 mg/m2 body surface area, administered intramuscularly) and, 3 days afterward, misoprostol (800 micrograms, given vaginally).
Number of abortions induced within 24 hours and within 10 days of misoprostol administration, number of surgical aspirations conducted because of incomplete abortion, mean amount of bleeding and pain and the number of women who, if faced with the same situation, said they would again choose a drug-induced abortion over a surgical one.
Abortion occurred within 24 hours of misoprostol administration among 48 women and within 10 days among 69 women. In total, 89 women had an abortion without surgical aspiration. Of these women, 71 said they would choose a drug-induced abortion if faced with the choice again.
Abortion induced with methotrexate and misoprostol appears to be a feasible alternative to surgical abortion and deserves further study.
Notes
Cites: Med J Aust. 1971 Nov 20;2(21):1076-75127491
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1995 Nov;173(5):1578-847503204
Cites: Cancer. 1976 Feb;37(2 Suppl):1043-7175914
Cites: Am J Med. 1990 Jun;88(6):589-922189302
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1990 Jun;162(6):1620-3; discussion 1623-42360595
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1991 May;77(5):754-72014091
Cites: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1991 Apr;98(4):396-92031899
Cites: Lancet. 1992 Feb 15;339(8790):4371346706
Cites: Contraception. 1991 Nov;44(5):523-321797467
Cites: BMJ. 1992 Feb 29;304(6826):5731497706
Cites: BMJ. 1992 May 23;304(6838):13801472199
Cites: Contraception. 1992 Jun;45(6):547-591617964
Cites: BMJ. 1992 Jul 18;305(6846):187-81515862
Cites: Contraception. 1992 Nov;46(5):435-421458890
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 May 27;328(21):1509-138479487
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1993 Jun;168(6 Pt 1):1759-62; discussion 1762-58317518
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 1993 Aug 1;47(1):59-648368254
Cites: BMJ. 1993 Sep 18;307(6906):714-78401094
Cites: Contraception. 1993 Oct;48(4):339-488222661
Cites: Contraception. 1993 Dec;48(6):519-258131393
Cites: JAMA. 1994 Oct 19;272(15):1190-57523739
Cites: Contraception. 1994 Dec;50(6):511-57705094
Cites: J Pediatr. 1968 Jun;72(6):790-55652604
Comment In: CMAJ. 1996 Jul 1;155(1):198673979
Comment In: CMAJ. 1996 Jan 15;154(2):185-78548707
Comment In: CMAJ. 1996 Jul 1;155(1):19-208673980
PubMed ID
8548705 View in PubMed
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"Academic drug-detailing": from project to practice in a Swedish urban area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210063
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1997;52(3):167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
C S Lundborg
L O Hensjö
L L Gustafsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Services, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. staff@ihcar.ki.se (attn: C. Stålsby Lundborg)
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1997;52(3):167-72
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Drug Information Services - organization & administration
Family Practice
Feasibility Studies
Humans
Information Services - economics
Norfloxacin - therapeutic use
Pharmacists
Questionnaires
Substance-Related Disorders
Sweden
Urinary Tract Infections - drug therapy
Abstract
To develop and test the long-term feasibility of an interdisciplinary independent drug information service providing both written and oral drug information to physicians in an urban area of Sweden (> 400,000 inhabitants).
A drug information service was developed encouraging a cooperative approach between a department of clinical pharmacology, general practitioners (GPs), pharmacists, and Drug and Therapeutic Committees. Scientifically-based drug information was condensed and interpreted by a team and presented in both written and oral form. In one part of the area, both oral and written information was provided, while in another part of the area, only written information was distributed. Questionnaires and one prescription survey were performed to elucidate the knowledge and attitudes of the GPs regarding drug treatment of one condition (urinary tract infection, UTI, and norfloxacin were used as examples), as well as their opinion of our services.
Over a period of 10 years, 75 issues of a drug bulletin (2000 copies) were distributed. Oral producer-independent drug information, provided jointly by a GP and a pharmacist, was given on 16 occasions in each of 30 health centres (150 GPs). Around 80% of the GPs participated in the meetings. Of these GPs, 75% found the service important for their daily work. A majority of the GPs had prescribed the test drug, norfloxacin, not a first-line drug according to local recommendations, 1 year after approval. A significantly lower proportion of prescribers were observed in the area where the GPs had been provided with both written and oral information regarding recommended treatment (including first-line drugs) for uncomplicated cystitis. The approximate cost for this service in 1995 was SEK 0.685 million (USD 0.1 million); the prescribing costs of the 150 GPs were estimated at SEK 255 million per year. This means that the cost of the service per GP is only around 0.3% of normal prescribing costs.
Over a period of 10 years the information/education method described here has proven sustainable and feasible in terms of providing the information, regarding participation of the target group GPs in the oral sessions, and regarding integration of the service into the existing health care system.
PubMed ID
9218921 View in PubMed
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Access and interest: two important issues in considering the feasibility of web-assisted tobacco interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154400
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2008;10(5):e37
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
John A Cunningham
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. John_Cunningham@camh.net
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2008;10(5):e37
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health Surveys
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Predictive value of tests
Regression Analysis
Smoking - adverse effects
Smoking Cessation - methods
Telephone
Therapy, Computer-Assisted - methods
User-Computer Interface
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous research has found that current smokers are less likely to have access to the Internet than nonsmokers. As access to the Internet continues to expand, does this finding remain true? Also, how many smokers are interested in Web-assisted tobacco interventions (WATIs)? These questions are important to determine the potential role that WATIs might play in promoting tobacco cessation.
The aims of the study were to determine whether smokers are less likely than nonsmokers to have access to the Internet and to establish the level of interest in WATIs among a representative sample of smokers.
A random digit dialing telephone survey was conducted of 8467 adult respondents, 18 years and older, in Ontario, Canada from September 2006 to August 2007. All respondents were asked their smoking status and whether they used the Internet (at home or work in the past 12 months; where; how often in the past 12 months). To assess the level of interest in WATIs, current daily smokers were asked whether they would be interested in a confidential program that they could access on the Internet, free of charge, that would allow them to check their smoking and compare it to other Canadians.
Smokers were marginally less likely to have used the Internet than nonsmokers (74% vs 81% in the last year), and, of those who had access to the Internet, smokers used the Internet less often than nonsmokers. Overall, 40% of smokers said they would be interested in a WATI. The number of cigarettes smoked per day was unrelated to level of interest in the WATI, but time to first cigarette after waking was. Smokers who used the Internet were more interested in the WATI than smokers who did not use the Internet (46% vs 20%).
While the difference in level of Internet use between smokers and nonsmokers was greatly reduced compared to 2002 and 2004 data, smokers still remain marginally less likely to use the Internet than nonsmokers. Overall, there was a substantial level of interest in the WATI among smokers, in particular among smokers who currently use the Internet. These results indicate that WATIs have a substantial potential audience among smokers, and, given the growing body of evidence regarding their efficacy, there is growing support that WATIs have a significant role to play in promoting tobacco cessation.
Notes
Cites: Br J Addict. 1989 Jul;84(7):791-92758152
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2005;7(1):e215829474
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2005 Apr;7(2):207-1616036277
Cites: J Health Commun. 2005;10 Suppl 1:105-1816377603
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2006;8(3):e1717032633
Cites: Tob Control. 2006 Feb;15(1):7-1216436397
Cites: Addict Behav. 2006 Feb;31(2):264-7715950392
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2006 Jan;25(1):79-8416492580
Cites: Med Inform Internet Med. 2006 Mar;31(1):53-816754367
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2006 Jan;75(1):110-616125450
PubMed ID
18984558 View in PubMed
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Accessing health care utilization databases for health research: a Canadian longitudinal study on aging feasibility study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147705
Source
Can J Aging. 2009 Sep;28(3):287-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Parminder S Raina
Susan A Kirkland
Christina Wolfson
Karen Szala-Meneok
Lauren E Griffith
Homa Keshavarz
Jennifer Uniat
Linda Furlini
Camille L Angus
Geoff Strople
Amélie Pelletier
Author Affiliation
McMaster Evidence-based Practice Center, McMaster University, Canada. praina@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2009 Sep;28(3):287-94
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Canada
Databases, Factual
Epidemiologic Research Design
Feasibility Studies
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Medical Record Linkage
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
ABSTRACTOne of the keys to the success of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA) will be the leveraging of secondary data sources, particularly health care utilization (HCU) data. To examine the practical, methodological, and ethical aspects of accessing HCU data, one-on-one qualitative interviews were conducted with 53 data stewards and privacy commissioners/ombudsmen from across Canada. Study participants indicated that obtaining permission to access HCU data is generally possible; however, they noted that this will be a complex and lengthy process requiring considerable and meticulous preparatory work to ensure proper documentation and compliance with jurisdictional variations along legislative and policy lines.
PubMed ID
19860983 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of central axis dose calculations for photon external radiotherapy beams in Finland: the quality of local beam data and the use of averaged data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159373
Source
Radiother Oncol. 2008 Feb;86(2):264-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Mika Kapanen
Petri Sipilä
Ritva Bly
Hannu Järvinen
Mikko Tenhunen
Author Affiliation
Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Helsinki, Finland. mika.kapanen@hus.fi
Source
Radiother Oncol. 2008 Feb;86(2):264-71
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Feasibility Studies
Finland
Humans
Photons
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Radiometry - methods
Radiotherapy Dosage - standards
Abstract
The accuracy of central axis dose calculation was evaluated for 48 photon beams from 28 linear accelerators at nine centres in Finland. In addition, inter-accelerator consistency of beam data was evaluated for Varian Clinac 600 CDs and 2100 CDs, and averaged data sets were generated for output factors (OFs) and percentage depth doses (PDDs). The averaged data sets obtained were used to identify potential dosimetry reasons for local errors.
Agreement between measured and calculated doses was determined at isocentre at 10 cm depth in water for nine different sized open square and rectangular fields. Averaged OFs were determined for nominal energies of 4, 6, 10, 15 and 18 MV both at d(max) and at a 10-cm depth. In order to develop a function for the OF data, OFs for square fields were parameterised through empirical model fitting. The feasibility of a simple equivalent square collimator formula was also evaluated for the presentation of OFs for rectangular fields. Averaged PDDs were determined at a 10-cm depth.
The difference between measured and calculated doses exceeded +/-3%, +/-2% and +/-1% for 3, 6 and 35 of the investigated 48 beams, respectively. The differences were due to errors observed in both OFs and depth dose data. When the agreement between dose calculation and measurement was within +/-1%, inter-accelerator differences in OFs were within +/-1.0% at both the depth of dose maximum and at 10 cm for Clinac 600 CDs and also for 2100 CDs. Differences in PDDs were within +/-1.2%.
The importance of quality control for beam data was demonstrated by showing significant errors in measured data. For Clinac 600 and 2100 CDs, the quality control can be accurately performed by comparing local data to averaged reference data. Robust averaged data sets were obtained for 6, 15 and 18 MV beams of Clinac 2100 CDs.
PubMed ID
18192045 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of quantitative parameters in (99m) Tc-MAG3 dynamic renography: a national audit based on virtual image data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277742
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2016 Mar;36(2):146-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Gustav Brolin
Lars Edenbrandt
Göran Granerus
Anna Olsson
David Afzelius
Agneta Gustafsson
Cathrine Jonsson
Jessica Hagerman
Lena Johansson
Katrine Riklund
Michael Ljungberg
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2016 Mar;36(2):146-54
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer simulation
Feasibility Studies
Female
Gamma Cameras
Humans
Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Kidney - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Kidney Diseases - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Male
Monte Carlo Method
Observer Variation
Phantoms, Imaging
Predictive value of tests
Radioisotope Renography - instrumentation - methods - standards
Radiopharmaceuticals - administration & dosage
Reproducibility of Results
Software
Sweden
Technetium Tc 99m Mertiatide - administration & dosage
Abstract
Assessment of image analysis methods and computer software used in (99m) Tc-MAG3 dynamic renography is important to ensure reliable study results and ultimately the best possible care for patients. In this work, we present a national multicentre study of the quantification accuracy in (99m) Tc-MAG3 renography, utilizing virtual dynamic scintigraphic data obtained by Monte Carlo-simulated scintillation camera imaging of digital phantoms with time-varying activity distributions. Three digital phantom studies were distributed to the participating departments, and quantitative evaluation was performed with standard clinical software according to local routines. The differential renal function (DRF) and time to maximum renal activity (Tmax ) were reported by 21 of the 28 Swedish departments performing (99m) Tc-MAG3 studies as of 2012. The reported DRF estimates showed a significantly lower precision for the phantom with impaired renal uptake than for the phantom with normal uptake. The Tmax estimates showed a similar trend, but the difference was only significant for the right kidney. There was a significant bias in the measured DRF for all phantoms caused by different positions of the left and right kidney in the anterior-posterior direction. In conclusion, this study shows that virtual scintigraphic studies are applicable for quality assurance and that there is a considerable uncertainty associated with standard quantitative parameters in dynamic (99m) Tc-MAG3 renography, especially for patients with impaired renal function.
PubMed ID
25348641 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of tele-oncology compared with face-to-face consultation in head and neck cancer case conferences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19396
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2001;7(6):338-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J. Stalfors
S. Edström
T. Björk-Eriksson
C. Mercke
J. Nyman
T. Westin
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. joacim.stalfors@orlforum.com
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2001;7(6):338-43
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case Management - organization & administration
Feasibility Studies
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Examination
Remote Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
Telemedicine was introduced for weekly tumour case conferences between Sahlgrenska University Hospital and two district hospitals in Sweden. The accuracy of tele-oncology was determined using simulated telemedicine consultations, in which all the material relating to each case was presented but without the patient in person. The people attending the conference were asked to determine the tumour ('TNM') classification and treatment. The patient was then presented in person, to give the audience the opportunity to ask questions and perform a physical examination. Then a new discussion regarding the tumour classification and the treatment plan took place, and the consensus was recorded. Of the 98 consecutive patients studied in this way, 80 could be evaluated by both techniques. Of these 80, 73 (91%) had the same classification and treatment plan in the telemedicine simulation as in the subsequent face-to-face consultation. In four cases the TNM classification was changed and for three patients the treatment plan was altered. The specialists also had to state their degree of confidence in the tele-oncology decisions. When they recorded uncertainty about their decision, it was generally because they wanted to palpate the tumour. In five of the seven patients with a different outcome, the clinical evaluation was stated to be dubious or not possible. The results show that telemedicine can be used safely for the management of head and neck cancers.
PubMed ID
11747635 View in PubMed
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870 records – page 1 of 87.