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134 records – page 1 of 14.

Absenteeism screening questionnaire (ASQ): a new tool for predicting long-term absenteeism among workers with low back pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132639
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2012 Mar;22(1):27-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Manon Truchon
Marie-Ève Schmouth
Denis Côté
Lise Fillion
Michel Rossignol
Marie-José Durand
Author Affiliation
Département des Relations Industrielles, Université Laval, Québec, Canada. manon.truchon@rlt.ulaval.ca
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2012 Mar;22(1):27-50
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Fear - psychology
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - psychology
Male
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Quebec
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Work
Workplace
Abstract
Over the last decades, psychosocial factors were identified by many studies as significant predictive variables in the development of disability related to common low back disorders, which thus contributed to the development of biopsychosocial prevention interventions. Biopsychosocial interventions were supposed to be more effective than usual interventions in improving different outcomes. Unfortunately, most of these interventions show inconclusive results. The use of screening questionnaires was proposed as a solution to improve their efficacy. The aim of this study was to validate a new screening questionnaire to identify workers at risk of being absent from work for more than 182 cumulative days and who are more susceptible to benefit from prevention interventions.
Injured workers receiving income replacement benefits from the Quebec Compensation Board (n = 535) completed a 67-item questionnaire in the sub-acute stage of pain and provided information about work-related events 6 and 12 months later. Reliability and validity of the 67-item questionnaire were determined respectively by test-retest reliability and internal consistency analysis, as well as by construct validity analyses. The Cox regression model and the maximum likelihood method were used to fix a model allowing calculation of a probability of absence of more than 182 days. Criterion validity and discriminative capacity of this model were calculated.
Sub-sections from the 67-item questionnaire were moderately to highly correlated 2 weeks later (r = 0.52-0.80) and showed moderate to good internal consistency (0.70-0.94). Among the 67-item questionnaire, six sub-sections and variables (22 items) were predictive of long-term absence from work: fear-avoidance beliefs related to work, return to work expectations, annual family income before-taxes, last level of education attained, work schedule and work concerns. The area under the ROC curve was 73%.
The significant predictive variables of long-term absence from work were dominated by workplace conditions and individual perceptions about work. In association with individual psychosocial variables, these variables could contribute to identify potentially useful prevention interventions and to reduce the significant costs associated with LBP long-term absenteeism.
PubMed ID
21796374 View in PubMed
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Acute posttraumatic stress: nonacceptance of early intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71884
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2001;62 Suppl 17:35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
L. Weisaeth
Author Affiliation
Division of Disaster Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. lars.weisath@psykiatri.uio.no
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2001;62 Suppl 17:35-40
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Acute Disease
Adaptation, Psychological
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cooperative Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dreams - psychology
Explosions - statistics & numerical data
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Fear - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mass Screening - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Sleep Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Social Isolation - psychology
Startle Reaction - physiology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Psychological resistance may be of considerable importance in the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) population, considering that researchers in the field of traumatic stress are frequently unsuccessful in achieving high response rates, that many subjects suffering from PTSD never seek help, and that dropouts from therapy are frequent. This article presents data on the main complaints reported in the acute aftermath of an industrial disaster by 246 employees who had been exposed to the disaster. The dominant concerns were symptomatic complaints related to posttraumatic stress reactions rather than external problems. Sleep disturbance, anxiety/fear responses, and physical symptoms were reported by individuals with complaints in the acute phase as most problematic, while irritability and depressive symptoms appeared very infrequently among the reported main complaints. A high specificity and sensitivity were achieved in predicting later PTSD (as defined by DSM-III criteria) by applying early response variables: thus, there were few false-positives and false-negatives. There was a considerable overlap between the PTSD predictors and the main symptom complaints. From a prevention point of view, this should be advantageous, since it would bring the right people to seek help. However, in a significant proportion of the acutely distressed, the reluctance to seek help was motivated by the very symptoms that predicted PTSD. Even a relatively high rate of subjects agreeing to be screened (82.8%) would have lost 42% of those who qualified for a diagnosis of PTSD, and more than half of the subjects with severe outcomes would not have been included. For primary and secondary prevention, the findings suggest that early screening and outreach should be very active.
PubMed ID
11495094 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' and Young Adults' Lived Experiences Following Venous Thromboembolism: "It will always lie in wait".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282460
Source
Nurs Res. 2016 Nov/Dec;65(6):455-464
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anette Arbjerg Højen
Pia S Dreyer
Deirdre A Lane
Torben Bjerregaard Larsen
Erik Elgaard Sørensen
Source
Nurs Res. 2016 Nov/Dec;65(6):455-464
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark
Fear - psychology
Female
Hermeneutics
Humans
Male
Quality of Life - psychology
Stress, Psychological
Venous Thromboembolism - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Long-term, mental well-being of adolescence and young adults diagnosed with venous thromboembolism (VTE) as experienced by the patients has received little attention.
The purpose of this study was to explore the essential meaning of adolescents' and young adults' lived experiences following VTE to gain an in-depth understanding of their long-term, mental well-being.
Semistructured interviews were conducted with 12 Danish patients who were diagnosed with VTE in adolescence or young adulthood. Interviews were analyzed according to a phenomenological hermeneutical approach inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricœur's theory of interpretation.
Four themes emerged. Participants described an experience of a creeping loss of youth immortality, a perception of being different, to live with a body in a state of alarm, and feel symptom management insecurity.
Mental well-being of adolescents and young adults diagnosed with VTE is negatively impacted in the long term. Fear of VTE recurrence predominates and is an important source of psychological distress. This study highlights the clinical importance of including the long-term, mental well-being in the overall assessment when developing rehabilitation programs for adolescents and young adults diagnosed with VTE.
PubMed ID
27801716 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease feel ambivalent towards their parents' concern for them.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87529
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Dec;21(4):476-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Reichenberg Kjell
Lindfred Helene
Saalman Robert
Author Affiliation
The Nordic School of Public Health and The Vårdal Institute, Lund and Göteborg Universities, Göteborg, Sweden. kjell@reichenberg.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Dec;21(4):476-81
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Anxiety - etiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Communication
Conflict (Psychology)
Cooperative Behavior
Fear - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - prevention & control - psychology
Male
Models, Psychological
Nursing Methodology Research
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Patient Education as Topic
Self Care - psychology
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Trust
Abstract
This is a grounded theory study to identify concepts for describing how adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) respond to their parents' concern for them. Ten adolescent boys and seven girls were interviewed. In the analysis four main categories emerged: ambivalence, ability/inability, compliance/resistance and trust/distrust. We found ambivalence to be the most distinctive theme to appear in the way in which these young people described how they felt about their parents' response to their disease. The core category ambivalence was expressed as an oscillation between seeking close contact with one's parents or, sometimes, staving them off, one moment feeling anxiously dependent upon them or turning to them for protection and support and the next, trying to achieve a dialogue with them. The core category comprised three subcategories, ability/inability, compliance/resistance and trust/distrust. The clinical support for young individuals with IBD should include an awareness of the simultaneous existence of conflicting attitudes, reactions and emotions.
PubMed ID
18036010 View in PubMed
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Afraid of medical care school-aged children's narratives about medical fear.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147224
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Dec;24(6):519-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Maria Forsner
Lilian Jansson
Anna Söderberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Social Sciences, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden. mfr@du.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Dec;24(6):519-28
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Psychology
Coercion
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Narration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Pediatric Nursing
Play and Playthings - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Patient Relations
Social Support
Sweden
Thinking
Videotape Recording
Abstract
Fear can be problematic for children who come into contact with medical care. This study aimed to illuminate the meaning of being afraid when in contact with medical care, as narrated by children 7-11 years old. Nine children participated in the study, which applied a phenomenological hermeneutic analysis methodology. The children experienced medical care as "being threatened by a monster," but the possibility of breaking this spell of fear was also mediated. The findings indicate the important role of being emotionally hurt in a child's fear to create, together with the child, an alternate narrative of overcoming this fear.
PubMed ID
19931150 View in PubMed
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Assessing the relative and absolute reliability of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International questionnaire in elderly individuals with increased fall risk and the questionnaire's convergent validity in elderly women with osteoporosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119212
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2013 Jun;24(6):1853-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
A. Halvarsson
E. Franzén
A. Ståhle
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, 23100, SE-141 83 Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. alexandra.halvarsson@ki.se
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2013 Jun;24(6):1853-8
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Fear - psychology
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Male
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - psychology
Proprioception
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Abstract
The Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) is a highly reliable questionnaire for assessing fear of falling in elderly individuals with increased fall risk and has low or no convergent validity with balance performance tests and health-related quality of life (HRQL) among elderly women with osteoporosis, which indicates that both measurements should be included as they are measuring different components.
Fear of falling is increased in elderly individuals with osteoporosis and FES-I is a widely used questionnaire to assess fear of falling. There is limited evidence of the reliability and convergent validity in elderly with increased risk of falling and osteoporosis.
Reliability and validity study of the FES-I. Community-dwelling elderly with increased fall risk, 59 subjects, were recruited to the reliability assessment, and 81 women with osteoporosis, in the validity assessment. For the reliability assessment, two postal surveys were used. For the validity assessment, we used baseline data from an on-going study in women with osteoporosis. The FES-I was correlated to a single-item question regarding fear of falling, self-reported history of falls, balance performance tests and health-related quality of life.
The FES-I had very good relative reliability (intra-class correlation 0.88) and internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha 0.94). The value for absolute reliability was a standard error of measure 2.9 (10.6 %), smallest real difference 7.9 (29 %). There was "little if any" to "low" correlation between the FES-I and the single-item question regarding fear of falling and self-reported history of falls, HRQL and balance performance tests.
The FES-I seems to be a highly reliable questionnaire for assessing fear of falling in elderly with increased fall risk but has low relation to/convergent validity with balance performance and HRQL among elderly women with osteoporosis.
PubMed ID
23124715 View in PubMed
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Attachment styles in patients with avoidant personality disorder compared with social phobia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285890
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2016 Sep;89(3):245-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Ingeborg Eikenaes
Geir Pedersen
Theresa Wilberg
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2016 Sep;89(3):245-60
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Object Attachment
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Phobia, Social - diagnosis - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Self Report
Abstract
Avoidant personality disorder (AvPD) and social phobia (SP) are common, closely related conditions. Little is known about the underlying processes related to the social discomfort of subjects with AvPD and SP. Both disorders are associated with interpersonal problems. An attachment perspective may shed light on similarities and differences in close relationships between the disorders. The aim of the study was to compare self-reported attachment styles in patients with AvPD and SP. We expected that patients with AvPD would have more attachment anxiety and avoidance and more often a Fearful attachment style, compared with SP.
This is a cross-sectional multisite study of 90 adult patients with AvPD and SP. Patients with AvPD with and without SP (AvPD group) were compared with patients with SP without AvPD (SP group).
Patients were assessed using structured diagnostic interviews and self-reporting questionnaires, including Experiences in Close Relationships (ECR). The ECR dimensions, Anxiety and Avoidance, and the new described five factors of the ECR were used.
The AvPD group had higher levels of attachment anxiety than the SP group, especially for the sub-factors Anxiety for abandonment and Separation frustration. The diagnostic groups did not differ in levels of avoidance. Anxiety for abandonment was still associated with AvPD after controlling for symptom disorders and the criteria of other personality disorders. A Fearful attachment style was more frequent among patients with AvPD.
The results indicate AvPD is associated with more attachment anxiety than SP. Fear of abandonment may play a significant role in the AvPD pathology.
This is the first study to compare attachment styles in patients with avoidant personality disorder (AvPD) and social phobia (SP). The AvPD group had higher attachment-related anxiety than the SP group, and anxiety was most pronounced for the fear of abandonment. Fear of abandonment may play an important role in the AvPD pathology.
PubMed ID
26332087 View in PubMed
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Before and after, the impact of available on-demand treatment for HAE.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268755
Source
Allergy Asthma Proc. 2015 Mar-Apr;36(2):145-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sandra C Christiansen
Anette Bygum
Aleena Banerji
Paula Busse
Henry Li
William Lumry
Mark Davis-Lorton
Jonathan A Bernstein
Michael M Frank
Anthony Castaldo
Janet F Long
Marc Riedl
Bruce L Zuraw
Source
Allergy Asthma Proc. 2015 Mar-Apr;36(2):145-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Angioedemas, Hereditary - complications - drug therapy - psychology
Child
Denmark
Disease Progression
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Fear - psychology
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Perception
Quality of Life
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Availability of effective treatment for acute attacks is expected to transform the care of hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients. We felt that it would be of interest to test these assumptions by examining the perceptions of HAE patients regarding the impact that these therapies have had on their lives. Patients at a United States HAE Association summit meeting were asked to rate the burden of HAE currently and compare by recall with 2009 when these therapies were not available. Questions covered five domains: psychological/emotional status, ability to carry out daily activities, fear of suffocation, worry about their children inheriting HAE, and medication side effects. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests or analysis of variance. Responses were obtained from 134 self-identified HAE subjects: 85 type I, 21 type II, and 28 with normal C1 inhibitor (C1INH). Burden of disease showed significant improvement in all domains except worry about children inheriting HAE. With the introduction of newer therapies, subjects with the most severe burden of illness improved more than those with milder burdens. However, significant burden of illness remained. The availability of the current treatments has substantially improved the quality of life for HAE patients in the United States, similar to a survey of Danish HAE patients regarding the introduction of home treatment. Nevertheless, our study shows that a substantial burden of illness remains for HAE patients.
PubMed ID
25715243 View in PubMed
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"Blind people don't run": Escaping the "nursing home specter" in Children of Nature and Cloudburst.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272014
Source
J Aging Stud. 2015 Aug;34:134-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Sally Chivers
Source
J Aging Stud. 2015 Aug;34:134-41
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Choice Behavior
Fear - psychology
Female
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Iceland
Inpatients - psychology
Long-Term Care
Male
Motion Pictures as Topic
Narration
Nursing Homes
Abstract
The paper compares two films, Children of Nature (Börn náttúrunnar, Iceland, Friðrik Þór Friðriksson, 1991) and Cloudburst (Canada, Thom Fitzgerald, 2010), which share remarkable similarities, despite their difference in historical and geographical origin. In focusing on these two examples, the paper shows the extent to which a widespread fear of long-term residential care evident in popular discourse motivates larger commentaries about growing old. Each narrative presents a romance catalyzed by the threat of long-term residential care. In both stories, the couples are depicted as fugitives from the law, escaping what is perceived as a fate worse than death in order to pursue death on their own terms. The paper explores the structure and significance of how they leave and what they accomplish while they are away. The films offer examples of a broader cultural discourse that is damaging, while they are also heartening in their satisfying representation of the possibility of escape. Through that, they indicate the importance of choice and desire to transforming residential care in a manner that could also transform popular understandings of the "nursing home."
PubMed ID
26162733 View in PubMed
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Canadian women's perspectives on ovarian cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200965
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1999 Feb;3(1):52-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
M I Fitch
R E Gray
D. DePetrillo
E. Franssen
D. Howell
Author Affiliation
Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Ont. marg_fitch@cancercare.on.ca
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1999 Feb;3(1):52-60
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attention - physiology
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Canada
Communication
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Intestinal Diseases - etiology
Life Style
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - psychology
Ovarian Neoplasms - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Patient satisfaction
Physician-Patient Relations
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sleep Disorders - etiology
Social Support
Abstract
To describe the perspectives of Canadian women living with ovarian cancer regarding their experiences with the disease.
A cross-sectional survey of a convenience sample of Canadian women with ovarian cancer.
Survey questionnaires were sent to physicians in 26 cancer programs that treat women with ovarian cancer and to ovarian cancer self-help groups for subsequent distribution to women.
Women diagnosed with ovarian cancer and able to read English or French.
A variety of individual items in the survey related to information received, communication, physical and psychosocial symptoms, impact of illness and quality of life.
A total of 315 women returned the survey. The average age of the respondents is 59 years. Each province and territory is represented in the sample. Over one-half of the women received a diagnosis of ovarian cancer within a month of seeking help for a concern and 85% had multiple treatment modalities. The majority of the women felt adequately informed (80%) and were satisfied with communication with their physicians (mean of 4.1 to 4.5 on a 5-point scale). A majority (62%) said that their lifestyle had changed as a result of their disease. Problems were experienced most frequently regarding side effects (58%), fear of recurrence (54%), sleeping difficulties (46%), bowel difficulties (44%), fear of dying (36%) and difficulty concentrating (32%). Many who experienced problems reported receiving inadequate help for them (16% to 49%). Quality of life was reported as significantly lower following the diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer (p = 0.0001).
This study provides an important foundation for further investigation. There is a pressing need for research regarding the early identification of ovarian cancer and issues of support and coping. Care for women with ovarian cancer requires the expertise of a range of disciplines and community-based agencies working collaboratively as a team.
PubMed ID
10474753 View in PubMed
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134 records – page 1 of 14.