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1157 records – page 1 of 116.

A 1-year randomized study to evaluate the effects of a dose reduction in oral contraceptives on lipids and carbohydrate metabolism: 20 microg ethinyl estradiol combined with 100 microg levonorgestrel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176202
Source
Contraception. 2005 Feb;71(2):111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Sven O Skouby
Jan Endrikat
Bernd Düsterberg
Werner Schmidt
Christoph Gerlinger
Jens Wessel
Henri Goldstein
Joergen Jespersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Frederiksberg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, DK 2000 Copenhagen F, Denmark. sven.skouby@fh.hosp.dk
Source
Contraception. 2005 Feb;71(2):111-7
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
C-Peptide - blood
Carbohydrate Metabolism - drug effects
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Contraceptive Agents, Female - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Contraceptives, Oral, Combined - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethinyl Estradiol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - blood
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Levonorgestrel - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
To evaluate the impact on lipid and carbohydrate variables of a combined one-third ethinyl estradiol (EE)/levonorgestrel (LNG) dose reduction in oral contraceptives.
In an open-label, randomized study, a dose-reduced oral contraceptive containing 20 microg EE and 100 microg LNG (20 EE/100 LNG) was compared with a reference preparation containing 30 microg EE and 150 microg LNG (30 EE/150 LNG). One-year data from 48 volunteers were obtained.
We found a decrease of HDL2 cholesterol and increases of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total triglycerides in both treatment groups from baseline to the 13th treatment cycle. Although for four of six variables, the changes in the 20 EE group were lower compared with the 30 EE group, none of the differences between the two treatments were statistically significant. The median values for the fasting levels of insulin, C-peptide and free fatty acids slightly increased or remained unchanged while the fasting glucose levels slightly decreased after 13 treatment cycles. While the glucose area under the curve (AUC) (0-3 h) was similar in both groups during the OGTT, the insulin AUC(0-3 h) was less increased in the 20 EE/100 LNG group compared with the 30 EE/150 LNG group. None of the differences between the treatment groups for any of the carbohydrate metabolism variables were statistically significant at any time point. Both study treatments were safe and well tolerated by the volunteers.
Similar effects on the lipid and carbohydrate profiles were found for both preparations. The balanced one-third EE dose reduction in this new oral contraceptive caused slightly lower, but insignificant, changes in the lipid and carbohydrate variables compared with the reference treatment.
PubMed ID
15707560 View in PubMed
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The 3-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase of mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis in Trypanosoma brucei.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87070
Source
FEBS Lett. 2008 Mar 5;582(5):729-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-5-2008
Author
Autio Kaija J
Guler Jennifer L
Kastaniotis Alexander J
Englund Paul T
Hiltunen J Kalervo
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. kaija.autio@oulu.fi
Source
FEBS Lett. 2008 Mar 5;582(5):729-33
Date
Mar-5-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Electrophoresis
Fatty Acids - biosynthesis
Genetic Complementation Test
Humans
Hydro-Lyases - chemistry - isolation & purification - metabolism
Mitochondria - enzymology
Molecular Sequence Data
Protein Transport
Recombinant Fusion Proteins - isolation & purification - metabolism
Saccharomyces cerevisiae - cytology - metabolism
Sequence Alignment
Thioctic Acid - metabolism
Trypanosoma brucei brucei - cytology - enzymology
Abstract
The trypanosomatid parasite Trypanosoma brucei synthesizes fatty acids in the mitochondrion using the type II fatty acid synthesis (FAS) machinery. When mitochondrial FAS was characterized in T. brucei, all of the enzymatic components were identified based on their homology to yeast mitochondrial FAS enzymes, except for 3-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase. Here we describe the characterization of T. brucei mitochondrial 3-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (TbHTD2), which was identified by its similarity to the human mitochondrial dehydratase. TbHTD2 can rescue the respiratory deficient phenotype of the yeast knock-out strain and restore the lipoic acid content, is localized in the mitochondrion and exhibits hydratase 2 activity.
PubMed ID
18258193 View in PubMed
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Aberrations in plasma phospholipid fatty acids in lung cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128904
Source
Lipids. 2012 Apr;47(4):363-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Rachel A Murphy
Taylor F Bureyko
Marina Mourtzakis
Quincy S Chu
M Thomas Clandinin
Tony Reiman
Vera C Mazurak
Author Affiliation
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, 4-126A Li Ka Shing Centre, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
Source
Lipids. 2012 Apr;47(4):363-9
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - drug therapy - metabolism - mortality
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Body mass index
Canada
Fatty Acids - analysis
Female
Humans
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Longitudinal Studies
Lung Neoplasms - drug therapy - metabolism - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Phospholipids - analysis
Survival Rate
Weight Loss
Abstract
Abnormalities in lipid metabolism have been frequently observed in cancer and are associated with a poor prognosis. However, a detailed, longitudinal characterization of fatty acid status is lacking. This study aimed to assess plasma phospholipid fatty acids before chemotherapy, immediately after and 1 month following chemotherapy in a group of 50 patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer and explore factors which may contribute to aberrations in fatty acids. Their mean ± SD characteristics: age 64 ± 8.5 years, 75% advanced stage disease, body mass index 27.0 ± 5.4 kg/m², 6 month weight loss -4.6 ± 6.1%. Compared to patients with early stage disease, patients with advanced disease had abnormal fatty acid profiles including significantly lower (P
PubMed ID
22160451 View in PubMed
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Absence of cardiovascular benefits and sportfish consumption among St. Lawrence River anglers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182864
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Nov;93(3):241-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Catherine Godin
Bryna Shatenstein
Gilles Paradis
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
Département de Médecine Sociale et préventive, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. catherine.godin@bigfoot.com
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Nov;93(3):241-7
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Diet
Dietary Fats
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - pharmacology
Fisheries
Fishes
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Seasons
Abstract
The benefits of sportfish consumption and omega-3 fatty acid (omega3-FA) intake for cardiovascular risk factors were evaluated in a sample of 112 male fishers from the St. Lawrence River in the Montreal area during the 1996 winter and fall fishing seasons. A questionnaire on fishing practices and fish consumption was administered, and fasting blood samples were collected for lipid and phospholipid determination. Linear regression analyses, which considered the confounding effect of major risk factors, did not show any significant association between measured omega3-FAs or reported fish intake and blood lipids or blood pressure. This study is limited by its low statistical power due to the small sample size and the possibility that the fish eaten by the participants were low in omega3-FAs or that the participants diets contained foods high in cholesterol-raising fat.
PubMed ID
14615233 View in PubMed
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Abyssivirga alkaniphila gen. nov., sp. nov., an alkane-degrading, anaerobic bacterium from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent system, and emended descriptions of Natranaerovirga pectinivora and Natranaerovirga hydrolytica.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275915
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2016 Apr;66(4):1724-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Anders Schouw
Tove Leiknes Eide
Runar Stokke
Rolf Birger Pedersen
Ida Helene Steen
Gunhild Bødtker
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2016 Apr;66(4):1724-34
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkanes - metabolism
Arctic Regions
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Base Composition
Biodegradation, Environmental
Clostridiales - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Fatty Acids - chemistry
Glycolipids - chemistry
Hydrothermal Vents - microbiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Peptidoglycan - chemistry
Phospholipids - chemistry
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
A strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, syntrophic, alkane-degrading strain, L81T, was isolated from a biofilm sampled from a black smoker chimney at the Loki's Castle vent field. Cells were straight, rod-shaped, Gram-positive-staining and motile. Growth was observed at pH?6.2-9.5, 14-42?°C and 0.5-6?% (w/w) NaCl, with optima at pH?7.0-8.2, 37?°C and 3% (w/w) NaCl. Proteinaceous substrates, sugars, organic acids and hydrocarbons were utilized for growth. Thiosulfate was used as an external electron acceptor during growth on crude oil. Strain L81T was capable of syntrophic hydrocarbon degradation when co-cultured with a methanogenic archaeon, designated strain LG6, isolated from the same enrichment. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain L81T is affiliated with the family Lachnospiraceae, and is most closely related to the type strains of Natranaerovirga pectinivora (92?% sequence similarity) and Natranaerovirga hydrolytica (90%). The major cellular fatty acids of strain L81T were C15?:?0, anteiso-C15?:?0 and C16?:?0, and the profile was distinct from those of the species of the genus Natranaerovirga. The polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unidentified phospholipids, four unidentified glycolipids and two unidentified phosphoglycolipids. The G+C content of genomic DNA was determined to be 31.7?mol%. Based on our phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic results, strain L81T is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus of the family Lachnospiraceae, for which we propose the name Abyssivirga alkaniphila gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Abyssivirga alkaniphila is L81T (=DSM 29592T=JCM 30920T). We also provide emended descriptions of Natranaerovirga pectinivora and Natranaerovirga hydrolytica.
PubMed ID
26822139 View in PubMed
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Activation of PPARgamma by metabolites from the flowers of purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99024
Source
J Nat Prod. 2009 May 22;72(5):933-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-22-2009
Author
Kathrine B Christensen
Rasmus K Petersen
Sidsel Petersen
Karsten Kristiansen
Lars P Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, University of Aarhus, Kirstinebjergvej 10, 5792 Aarslev, Denmark. kbch@kbm.sdu.dk
Source
J Nat Prod. 2009 May 22;72(5):933-7
Date
May-22-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3T3-L1 Cells
Animals
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Echinacea - chemistry
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Flowers - chemistry
Glucose - metabolism
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Mice
PPAR gamma - drug effects - metabolism
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Abstract
Thiazolidinediones are insulin sensitizing drugs that target the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma. An n-hexane extract of the flowers of Echinacea purpurea was found to activate PPARgamma without stimulating adipocyte differentiation. Bioassay-guided fractionations yielded five alkamides, of which one was new, and three fatty acids that all activated PPARgamma. The new alkamide hexadeca-2E,9Z,12Z,14E-tetraenoic acid isobutylamide (5) was identified by analysis of spectroscopic data and found to activate PPARgamma with no concurrent stimulation of adipocyte differentiation. Compound 5 was further shown to increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. The data suggest that flowers of E. purpurea contain compounds with potential to manage insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.
PubMed ID
19374389 View in PubMed
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Active sensitization and contact allergy to methyl 2-octynoate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98137
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2010 Feb;62(2):97-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Maria Vølund Heisterberg
Martine Vigan
Jeanne Duus Johansen
Author Affiliation
National Allergy Research Centre, Department of Dermato-allergology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. mavohe01@geh.regionh.dk
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2010 Feb;62(2):97-101
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cosmetics - adverse effects - diagnostic use
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated - adverse effects - diagnostic use
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Immunization
Male
Middle Aged
Patch Tests
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Methyl 2-octynoate is a synthetic fragrance which was first described to have sensitizing properties in 1935. It is one of the 26 fragrances to be labelled on the ingredient list according to current European cosmetics regulation. OBJECTIVES: To report the experience with patch testing with methyl 2-octynoate 1% and 2% in pet. METHODS: 230 eczema patients were consecutively patch tested with 1% methyl 2-octynoate at department of Dermato-allergology Gentofte Hospital, Denmark and 120 eczema patients were consecutively patch tested with 2% M2O in Finn Chambers at the Départment de Dermatologie, CHU Saint Jacques, France. RESULTS: Three cases of active sensitization were observed. 2 (0.87%) of the 230 Danish subjects tested with 1% in pet. and of the 120 French subjects patch tested with 2% in pet. 1 (0.83%). There was no statistical difference in active sensitization between the two groups (P = 0.72). Allergic contact dermatitis was observed in two patients (1.67%) in the French group and none in the Danish group. CONCLUSION: Contact allergy to methyl 2-octynoate was frequently seen when patch testing with 2% in pet. However, active sensitization was also observed, when patch testing with concentrations of 1% and 2% methyl 2-octynoate. The patch test concentration should be below 1% in pet., but a safe concentration remains to be defined.
PubMed ID
20136892 View in PubMed
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Acyl pattern of adipose tissue triglycerides, plasma free fatty acids, and diet of a group of men participating in a primary coronary prevention program (the Oslo Study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55772
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1983 Dec;38(6):906-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1983
Author
B K Jacobsen
K. Trygg
I. Hjermann
M S Thomassen
C. Real
K R Norum
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1983 Dec;38(6):906-13
Date
Dec-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - analysis
Adult
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Dietary Fats - therapeutic use
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - analysis
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Triglycerides - analysis
Abstract
The acyl pattern of adipose tissue triglycerides and of plasma free fatty acids were determined after 7 yr of diet intervention on elevated plasma cholesterol in 42 men taking part in the smoking-lipid trial of the Oslo Study. Twenty-two of the men were advised to change dietary habits (mainly reduce saturated fat) whereas the remaining 20 were controls. The adipose tissue from men in the intervention group contained relatively more linoleic and linolenic acids and relatively less saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids compared to men in the control group. There were strong correlations between the relative content of several fatty acids in adipose tissue triglycerides and plasma free fatty acid. Furthermore, there was a close correlation between the intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids found in a dietary survey done 2 to 3 yr before this study and the relative content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in adipose tissue.
PubMed ID
6650449 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of colonic fermentation and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion with increased wheat fibre intake for 1 year in hyperinsulinaemic human subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149233
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jan;103(1):82-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Kristin R Freeland
Charlotte Wilson
Thomas M S Wolever
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jan;103(1):82-90
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Carboxylic Acids - blood
Cereals
Colon - physiopathology
Dietary Fiber
Energy Metabolism
Exercise
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - blood
Female
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 - blood - secretion
Humans
Hyperinsulinism - blood - diet therapy - physiopathology
Insulin - blood
Male
Ontario
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Triticum
Abstract
High cereal fibre intake is associated with reduced risk for type 2 diabetes, but wheat fibre had little or no effect on glycaemic control or oral glucose tolerance in clinical trials lasting 4-12 weeks. To explain this discrepancy, we hypothesised that colonic adaptation to increased wheat fibre intake takes many months but eventually results in increased SCFA production and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. Thus, the primary objective was to determine the time-course of the effects of increased wheat fibre intake on plasma acetate, butyrate and GLP-1 concentrations in hyperinsulinaemic human subjects over 1 year. Subjects with fasting plasma insulin >or= 40 pmol/l were randomly assigned by computer to receive either a high-wheat fibre cereal (fibre group; 24 g fibre/d; twenty assigned; six dropped out, fourteen included) or a low-fibre cereal (control group; twenty assigned; six dropped-out, fourteen included) daily for 1 year. Acetate, butyrate and GLP-1 were measured during 8 h metabolic profiles performed every 3 months. There were no differences in body weight in the fibre group compared with the control group. After 9 months baseline-adjusted mean 8 h acetate and butyrate concentrations were higher on the high-fibre than the control cereal (P
PubMed ID
19664300 View in PubMed
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Addressing poor nutrition to promote heart health: moving upstream.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140561
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Aug-Sep;26 Suppl C:21C-4C
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kim D Raine
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. kim.raine@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Aug-Sep;26 Suppl C:21C-4C
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body mass index
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - diet therapy - prevention & control
Cereals
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Dietary Fiber
Energy intake
Evidence-Based Medicine
Fatty acids
Fishes
Food Habits
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Nutrition Policy
Nuts
Obesity - diet therapy - prevention & control
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Public Health
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Vegetables
Abstract
Current dietary recommendations for cardiovascular disease prevention suggest dietary patterns that promote achieving healthy weight, emphasize vegetables, legumes, fruit, whole grains, fish and nuts, substituting mono-unsaturated fats for saturated fats and restricting dietary sodium to less than 2300 mg/day. However, trends in nutrient intake and food consumption patterns suggest that the need for improvement in the dietary patterns of Canadians is clear. Influencing eating behaviour requires more than addressing nutrition knowledge and perceptions of healthy eating - it requires tackling the context within which individuals make choices. A comprehensive approach to improving nutrition includes traditional downstream strategies such as counselling to improve knowledge and skills; midstream strategies such as using the media to change social norms; and upstream strategies such as creating supportive environments through public policy including regulatory measures. While the evidence base for more upstream strategies continues to grow, key examples of comprehensive approaches to population change provide a call to action.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20847988 View in PubMed
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1157 records – page 1 of 116.