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Antioxidant vitamins, long-chain fatty acids, and spontaneous preterm birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149956
Source
Epidemiology. 2009 Sep;20(5):707-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Michael S Kramer
Susan R Kahn
Robert W Platt
Jacques Genest
Rima Rozen
Moy Fong Chen
Lise Goulet
Louise Séguin
Clément Dassa
John Lydon
Helen McNamara
Mourad Dahhou
Julie Lamoureux
Rhobert W Evans
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, McGill University Faculty of Medicine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. michael.kramer@mcgill.ca
Source
Epidemiology. 2009 Sep;20(5):707-13
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antioxidants - analysis
Case-Control Studies
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Vitamins - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Neither macro- nor micronutrient supplements have been clearly demonstrated to reduce the risk of preterm birth. However, there has been little attention to carotenoids, tocopherols, and long-chain fatty acids other than n-3 polyunsaturates.
We conducted a case-control study nested in a large (n = 5337) prospective, multicenter cohort. All cohort women had an interview, examination, and venipuncture at 24-26 weeks' gestation. Frozen plasma samples in spontaneous preterm births (n = 207) and approximately 2-term controls per case (n = 443) were analyzed for carotenoids, retinol, tocopherols, and long-chain fatty acids. Fresh placentas were fixed, stained, and assessed (without knowledge of pregnancy outcome) for histologic evidence of infection or inflammation, decidual vasculopathy, and infarction.
High (above the median) plasma concentrations of alpha- and beta-carotene, alpha- and beta-cryptoxanthin, and lycopene were all associated with reductions in risk of spontaneous preterm birth, with evidence of dose-response effects across quartiles. Modest increases in risk were observed with elevated total monounsaturated, total polyunsaturated, and total n-6 polyunsaturated long-chain fatty acids concentrations. Paradoxically, a high gamma-tocopherol concentration was associated with increased preterm birth risk (adjusted odds ratio = 1.8 [95% confidence interval = 1.2-2.6]). Only one of the studied micronutrients (lutein) was independently associated with a reduced risk of decidual vasculopathy (0.5 [0.3-0.9]).
Carotenoids and long-chain fatty acids warrant further investigation in in vitro, animal, and human studies of preterm birth.
PubMed ID
19568173 View in PubMed
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Assessing the relationship between perfluoroalkyl substances, thyroid hormones and binding proteins in pregnant women; a longitudinal mixed effects approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268360
Source
Environ Int. 2015 Apr;77:63-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Vivian Berg
Therese Haugdahl Nøst
Solrunn Hansen
Astrid Elverland
Anna-Sofía Veyhe
Rolf Jorde
Jon Øyvind Odland
Torkjel Manning Sandanger
Source
Environ Int. 2015 Apr;77:63-9
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Carrier Proteins - blood
Cohort Studies
Environmental pollutants - blood
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood
Humans
Linear Models
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, Second - blood
Thyroid Hormones - blood
Thyrotropin - blood
Abstract
The mechanisms involved in thyroid homeostasis are complex, and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have been indicated to interfere at several levels in this endocrine system. Disruption of the maternal thyroid homeostasis during early pregnancy is of particular concern, where subclinical changes in maternal thyroid hormones (THs) may affect embryonic and foetal development. The present study investigated associations between THs, thyroid binding proteins (TH-BPs) and PFAS concentrations in pregnant women from Northern Norway. Women participating in The Northern Norway Mother-and-Child contaminant Cohort Study (MISA) donated a blood sample at three visits related to their pregnancy and postpartum period (during the second trimester, 3 days and 6 weeks after delivery) in the period 2007-2009. Participants were assigned to quartiles according to PFAS concentrations during the second trimester and mixed effects linear models were used to investigate potential associations between PFASs and repeated measurements of THs, TH-BPs, thyroxin binding capacity and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (anti-TPOs). Women within the highest perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) quartile had 24% higher mean concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) compared to the first quartile at all sampling points. Women within the highest quartiles of perfluorodecanoate (PFDA) had 4% lower mean concentrations of triiodothyronine (T3) and women within the highest quartile of perfluoroundecanoate (PFUnDA) had 3% lower mean concentrations of free triiodothyronine (FT3). Further, the difference in concentrations and the changes between three time points were the same for the PFAS quartiles. Thyroxin binding capacity was associated with all the THs and TH-BPs, and was selected as a holistic adjustment for individual changes in TH homeostasis during pregnancy. Finally, adjusting for maternal iodine status did not influence the model predictions. Findings in the present study suggest modifications of TH homeostasis by PFASs in a background exposed maternal population. The variation in levels of THs between PFAS quartiles was within normal reference ranges and may not be of clinical significance in the pregnant woman. However, subtle individual changes in maternal THs may have significant consequences for foetal health.
PubMed ID
25647630 View in PubMed
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Assessment of consumption of marine food in Greenland by a food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123804
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18361
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Charlotte Jeppesen
Marit Eika Jørgensen
Peter Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
The National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen K, Denmark. chj@niph.dk
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18361
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Food Habits
Greenland
Humans
Male
Mercury - blood
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Seafood
Abstract
We studied the association and agreement between questionnaire data and biomarkers of marine food among Greenland Inuit.
Cross sectional study.
The study population comprised 2,224 Inuit, age 18+ (43% men); data collected 2005-2008 in Greenland. Using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), we calculated consumption of seal, whale, and fish (g/day) and as meals/month, intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), total N3, and mercury. We measured erythrocyte membrane fatty acids (FA) and whole blood mercury (Hg). Associations were assessed by Pearson correlation and agreement between the 2 methods was assessed by Bland-Altman plots depicting mean difference between the methods. Using multiple linear regressions, the associations were studied between whole blood mercury, erythrocyte FA and frequency or gram per day of seal, whale, and fish.
Partial correlations ranged from r=0.16, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22663940 View in PubMed
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Association between serum fatty acids and lipoprotein subclass profile in healthy young adults: exploring common genetic and environmental factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259002
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2014 Apr;233(2):394-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Aline Jelenkovic
Leonie H Bogl
Richard J Rose
Antti J Kangas
Pasi Soininen
Mika Ala-Korpela
Jaakko Kaprio
Karri Silventoinen
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2014 Apr;233(2):394-402
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Fats
Fatty Acids - blood
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genetic Pleiotropy
Humans
Lipoproteins - blood - classification
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular
Particle Size
Phenotype
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Self Report
Triglycerides - blood
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Young Adult
Abstract
Little is known about the associations of serum fatty acids with lipoprotein profile and the underlying genetic and environmental etiology of these relationships. We aimed to analyze the phenotypic association of serum n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated (PUFAs), monounsaturated (MUFAs) and saturated (SFAs) fatty acids (relative proportion to total fatty acids) with lipids and lipoproteins, and to quantify common genetic and environmental factors determining their covariation.
Two cohorts of healthy Finnish twins were assessed in young adulthood. Data were available for 1269 individual twins including 561 complete pairs. Serum metabolites were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Bivariate quantitative genetic models were used to decompose the phenotypic covariance between the pairs of traits into genetic and environmental components.
Among the strongest correlations observed, serum total n-6 PUFAs and linoleic acid were inversely (max. r=-0.65) and MUFAs positively (max. r=0.63) correlated with triglycerides and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle concentration, particularly with large VLDL (for n-6 PUFAs) and medium VLDL (for MUFAs). Genetic factors significantly contributed to their covariance with bivariate heritability estimates ranging from 44% to 56% for n-6 PUFAs and 58% to 66% for MUFAs. Genetic correlations with lipid traits were moderate to high (max. rA=-0.59 and 0.70 for n-6 PUFAs and MUFAs, respectively). Statistically significant, but substantially weaker phenotypic correlations of total n-3 PUFAs, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and SFAs with lipoprotein profile were not decomposed into their genetic and environmental components.
Shared genetic factors are important in explaining why higher concentrations of serum n-6 PUFAs and lower concentrations of serum MUFAs strongly associate with lower triglyceride and VLDL particle concentrations.
PubMed ID
24530769 View in PubMed
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Association of erythrocyte membrane fatty acids with changes in glycemia and risk of type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106522
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jan;99(1):79-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Yuvaraj Mahendran
Jyrki Ågren
Matti Uusitupa
Henna Cederberg
Jagadish Vangipurapu
Alena Stancáková
Ursula Schwab
Johanna Kuusisto
Markku Laakso
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Sciences, Internal Medicine (YM, HC, JV, AS, JK, and ML), the Institute of Biomedicine Physiology (JÅ), and the Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition (MU and US), University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland, and the Research Unit (MU) and the Department of Medicine (HC, JK, and ML), Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jan;99(1):79-85
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
8,11,14-Eicosatrienoic Acid - blood
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body mass index
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - etiology - prevention & control
Erythrocyte Membrane - metabolism
European Continental Ancestry Group
Fatty Acids - blood
Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated - blood
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hyperglycemia - blood - complications
Insulin - blood - secretion
Insulin Resistance
Linear Models
Linoleic Acid - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase - metabolism
Abstract
The significance of erythrocyte membrane fatty acids (EMFAs) and their ratios to predict hyperglycemia and incident type 2 diabetes is unclear.
We investigated EMFAs as predictors of the worsening of hyperglycemia and incident type 2 diabetes in a 5-y follow-up of a population-based study.
We measured EMFAs in 1346 Finnish men aged 45-73 y at baseline [mean ± SD age: 55 ± 6 y; body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 26.5 ± 3.5]. Our prospective follow-up study included only men who were nondiabetic at baseline and who had data available at the 5-y follow-up visit (n = 735).
Our study showed that, after adjustment for confounding factors, palmitoleic acid (16:1n-7; P = 2.8 × 10(-7)), dihomo-?-linolenic acid (20:3n-6; P = 2.3 × 10(-4)), the ratio of 16:1n-7 to 16:0 (P = 1.6 × 10(-8)) as a marker of stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 activity, and the ratio of 20:3n-6 to 18:2n-6 (P = 9.4 × 10(-7)) as a marker of ?(6)-desaturase activity significantly predicted the worsening of hyperglycemia (glucose area under the curve in an oral-glucose-tolerance test). In contrast, linoleic acid (18:2n-6; P = 0.0015) and the ratio of 18:1n-7 to 16:1n-7 (P = 1.5 × 10(-9)) as a marker of elongase activity had opposite associations. Statistical significance persisted even after adjustment for baseline insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and glycemia. Palmitoleic acid (P = 0.010) and the ratio of 16:1n-7 to 16:0 (P = 0.004) nominally predicted incident type 2 diabetes, whereas linoleic acid had an opposite association (P = 0.004), and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids did not show any associations.
EMFAs and their ratios are associated longitudinally with changes in glycemia and the risk type 2 diabetes.
PubMed ID
24153340 View in PubMed
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[Association of fatty acid composition of blood serum with bile lipid composition in cholelithiasis patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158045
Source
Ter Arkh. 2008;80(2):71-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
V V Tsukanov
E Iu Kupershtein
Iu L Tonkikh
E P Bronnikova
Source
Ter Arkh. 2008;80(2):71-5
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bile - chemistry
Bile Acids and Salts - analysis
Biological Markers - analysis - metabolism
Cholelithiasis - epidemiology - metabolism
Chromatography, Gas
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine correlations between bile lipid composition and fatty acid composition of blood serum in cholelithiasis patients.
Cholelithiasis prevalence in Khakasia Republic was studied in a clinico-epidemiological trial with participation of 1393 European people and 1060 mongoloid people--Khakasians. Bile lipids and serum fatty acids were measured.
Europeans had cholelithiasis in 7.3%, Khakasians--3.4% (p
PubMed ID
18372601 View in PubMed
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Associations of the serum long-chain n-3 PUFA and hair mercury with resting heart rate, peak heart rate during exercise and heart rate recovery after exercise in middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295183
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 01; 119(1):66-73
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Behnam Tajik
Sudhir Kurl
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Kai Savonen
Jyrki K Virtanen
Author Affiliation
1Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition,University of Eastern Finland,70211 Kuopio,Finland.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 01; 119(1):66-73
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ergometry
Exercise Test
Fatty Acids - blood
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Finland
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Hair - chemistry
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Mercury - analysis
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Seafood - analysis
Abstract
Long-chain n-3 PUFA from fish have been associated with lower risk of CVD. Fish may also contain methylmercury, which may attenuate the inverse associations of the long-chain n-3 PUFA. However, the mechanisms underlying these associations are not fully known. We evaluated the associations of the serum long-chain n-3 PUFA (EPA, DPA and DHA) and hair Hg with resting heart rate (HR), peak HR during cycle ergometer exercise and HR recovery after exercise. A total of 1008 men from the population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, aged 42-60 years and free of CVD, were studied. After multivariate-adjustments in ANCOVA, higher serum total long-chain n-3 PUFA concentration was associated with lower resting HR (extreme-quartile difference 2·2 beats/min; 95 % CI 0·2, 4·1, P trend across quartiles=0·02), but not with peak HR or HR recovery. Associations were generally similar when EPA, DPA and DHA were evaluated individually, except for DPA, which was also associated with better HR recovery after exercise (extreme-quartile difference 2·1 beats/min; 95 % CI 0·1, 4·2, P trend=0·06). Higher hair Hg content had a trend towards lower peak HR after adjusting for the long-chain n-3 PUFA (P trend=0·05), but it only slightly attenuated the associations of the serum long-chain n-3 PUFA with HR. These findings suggest that higher serum long-chain n-3 PUFA concentrations are associated with lower resting HR in middle-aged men from Eastern Finland, which may partially explain the potential cardioprotective effect of fish intake.
PubMed ID
29208059 View in PubMed
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Atherosclerosis precursors in Finnish children and adolescents. V. Fatty acid composition of serum cholesteryl esters: regional differences in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239578
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1985;318:111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
T. Moilanen
T. Nikkari
J. Viikari
H K Akerblom
L. Räsänen
M. Ahola
M. Dahl
P L Lähde
E. Pesonen
M. Pietikäinen
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1985;318:111-7
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Cholesterol Esters - blood
Coronary Disease - blood
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Finland
Humans
Linoleic Acid
Linoleic Acids - blood
Male
Risk
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
Fatty acid compositions of serum cholesteryl esters (CE) were analysed with gas chromatography from a total of 1,348 Finnish children. The study was a part of a comprehensive survey of atherosclerosis precursors among children, and included 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-, 15-, and 18-year-old children and adolescents from five urban and twelve rural communities in Finland. In all age groups and both sexes, the mean percentages of linoleate (CE-18:2) were lower and those of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids higher in eastern rural areas than elsewhere. Eastern rural children also had significantly higher proportions of omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in their serum CE's. The percentage of serum CE-18:2 parallels the P/S values obtained by a dietary survey from the same populations. The reason for higher percentages of the omega 3 fatty acids in rural communities cannot be explained by diet, and remains unclear.
PubMed ID
3867222 View in PubMed
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Biochemical and clinical effects of an antioxidative supplementation of geriatric patients. A double blind study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231059
Source
Biol Trace Elem Res. 1989 Apr-May;20(1-2):135-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Clausen
S A Nielsen
M. Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Life Sciences and Chemistry, University of Roskilde, Denmark.
Source
Biol Trace Elem Res. 1989 Apr-May;20(1-2):135-51
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antioxidants - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Clinical Trials as Topic
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Emotions - drug effects
Erythrocytes - enzymology
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Glutathione Peroxidase - blood
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Lipofuscin - blood
Male
Psychomotor Performance - drug effects
Selenium - blood
Vitamin E - blood
Abstract
Ninety seven geriatric patients from two Danish homes for old people accepted to participate in a blinded experiment designed to counteract ageing phenomena. The subjects were split into two groups, i.e., the verum and the placebo group. The verum group received daily for one year an antioxidative cocktail consisting of: 300 micrograms selenium as L-selenomethionine, 45 mg zinc, 270 mg vitamin C, 2.7 mg vitamin A, 6 mg vitamin B-6, and 465 mg vitamin E (d-alfatocopherol). Furthermore, in order to enhance exchange in polyenoic acids, each subject received daily 250 mg gamma-linolenic acid. The placebo groups received similar looking pills and capsules without the active components. During one year in the verum group, the whole blood selenium, the hydrogen-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) of erythrocytes, and the vitamin E level in serum was found increased compared to the pretreatment values and to the placebo group. No change could be traced in the t-butylhydroperoxide dependent GSH-Px, an enzyme that also assays the glutathione-s-transferase. During the same period of time, the fasting levels of serum fatty acids and the content of lipofuscin in erythrocytes were estimated. Compared to the pretreatment values, the lipofuscin level declined significantly and the level of w-3 penta- and hexaenoic acids increased in the verum, but not in the placebo group. During the study period, slight, but significant improvements in psychological scores could be traced. Furthermore, the assays of bloodflow in different areas of the brain surface (i.e., the ISI values) revealed a general trend to improvement in all areas, when the ISI values were compared during treatment with the pretreatment values and the values in the placebo group.
PubMed ID
2484393 View in PubMed
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Biomarkers of endothelial activation and thrombosis in tunnel construction workers exposed to airborne contaminants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285393
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2017 May;90(4):309-317
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Dag G Ellingsen
Ingebjørg Seljeflot
Yngvar Thomassen
Magny Thomassen
Berit Bakke
Bente Ulvestad
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2017 May;90(4):309-317
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biomarkers - blood
CD40 Ligand - blood
Carbon - analysis
Construction Industry
Fatty Acids - blood
Humans
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Exposure - analysis
P-Selectin - blood
Particulate Matter - analysis
Platelet Activation
Quartz - analysis
Thrombosis
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - blood
Vehicle Emissions
Abstract
The aims were to study biomarkers of systemic inflammation, platelet/endothelial activation and thrombosis in tunnel construction workers (TCW).
Biomarkers and blood fatty acids were measured in blood of 90 TCW and 50 referents before (baseline) and towards the end (follow-up) of a 12 days work period. They had been absent from work for 9 days at baseline. Air samples were collected by personal sampling.
Personal thoracic air samples showed geometric mean (GM) particulate matter and a-quartz concentrations of 604 and 74 µg/m(3), respectively. The arithmetic mean (AM) concentration of elemental carbon was 51 µg/m(3). The GM (and 95% confidence interval) concentration of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-a decreased from 2.2 (2.0-2.4) at baseline to 2.0 pg/mL (1.8-2.2) (p?=?0.02) at follow-up among the TCW. Also the platelet activation biomarkers P-selectin and CD40L decreased significantly [25.4 (24.1-26.6) to 24.4 (22.9-26.0)] ng/mL, p?=?0.04 and 125 (114-137) to 105 (96-115) pg/mL, p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
28124139 View in PubMed
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130 records – page 1 of 13.