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Adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98176
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
D. Iggman
J. Arnlöv
B. Vessby
T. Cederholm
P. Sjögren
U. Risérus
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Aged
Chromatography, Gas
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Docosahexaenoic Acids - analysis
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - analysis
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Glucose Clamp Technique
Health Surveys
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Palmitic Acid - analysis
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Dietary fatty acids may affect insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue fatty acid composition partly reflects long-term dietary intake, but data from large studies regarding relationships with insulin sensitivity are lacking. We aimed to determine the association between adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly Swedish men. METHODS: In a cross-sectional analysis of the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n = 795, mean age 71 years), adipose tissue biopsies were obtained and fatty acid composition was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Insulin sensitivity was measured directly by a euglycaemic clamp. RESULTS: Palmitic acid (16:0), the major saturated fatty acid (SFA) in the diet and in adipose tissue, was negatively correlated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.14), as were 16:1 n-7 (r = -0.15), 20:3 n-6 (r = -0.31), 20:4 n-6 (r = -0.38), 22:4 n-6 (r = -0.37) and 22:5 n-3 (r = -0.24; p
Notes
RefSource: Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):799-801
PubMed ID
20127308 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue fatty acids in men from two populations with different cardiovascular risk: the LiVicordia study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54224
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1999 May;59(3):227-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
A. Kaminskas
B. Ziedén
B. Elving
M. Kristenson
A. Abaravicius
B. Bergdahl
A G Olsson
Z. Kucinskiene
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius, Lithuania.
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1999 May;59(3):227-32
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - metabolism
Diet, Atherogenic
Dietary Fats - analysis
Fatty Acids - analysis
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Humans
Lipid Peroxidation - physiology
Lipoproteins, LDL - metabolism
Lithuania - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Myristic Acid - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
alpha-Linolenic Acid - analysis
Abstract
The LiVicordia study was set up to investigate possible causes for coronary heart disease mortality in middle-aged Lithuanian men being four times higher than in Swedish men. In a previous part of this study we found lower total and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in the Lithuanian men in spite of them having a higher fat intake than in the Swedish men. Their LDL was also more susceptible to oxidation in vitro than was that of the Swedish men. Fat quality can influence LDL oxidation. In order to obtain data on long-term fat quality intake we measured the fatty acid composition of abdominal wall adipose tissue by gas chromatography in men aged 50 years from Vilnius, Lithuania (n=50) and Linköping, Sweden (n=50). Men from Vilnius had a significantly higher percentage of adipose tissue long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (20:4n6, 20:5n3, 22:5n5, 22:6n3) and lower percentage of saturated fatty acids, especially myristic acid (14:0), 3.4+/-0.7 versus 4.6+/-0.8, p
PubMed ID
10400167 View in PubMed
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Association of Adipose Tissue Fatty Acids With Cardiovascular and All-Cause Mortality in Elderly Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295101
Source
JAMA Cardiol. 2016 10 01; 1(7):745-753
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
10-01-2016
Author
David Iggman
Johan Ärnlöv
Tommy Cederholm
Ulf Risérus
Author Affiliation
Unit for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden2Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
Source
JAMA Cardiol. 2016 10 01; 1(7):745-753
Date
10-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Fatty Acids - analysis
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden
Abstract
The major polyunsaturated fatty acids in adipose tissue objectively reflect long-term dietary intake, and may provide more reliable information than would self-reported intake. Whether adipose tissue fatty acids predict cardiovascular and all-cause mortality needs investigation.
To investigate associations between adipose tissue fatty acids and cardiovascular and overall mortality in a cohort of elderly men.
We hypothesized that polyunsaturated fatty acids reflecting dietary intake, are inversely associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. In the Swedish cohort study Uppsala Longitudinal Cohort of Adult Men, buttock fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography in 1992 to 1993 and 2008. The study participants were followed during 11?311 person-years, between 1991 and 2011 (median follow-up, 14.8 years). In this community-based study that took place from 1970 to 1973, all men born in 1920 to 1924 in Uppsala, Sweden, were invited and 2322 (82%) were included (at age 50 years). At the reinvestigation at age 71 years, 1221 (73%) of the 1681 invited men participated. Adipose tissue biopsy specimens were taken in a subsample of 853 men. There was no loss to follow-up.
Adipose tissue proportions of 4 polyunsaturated fatty acids that were considered to mainly reflect dietary intake (linoleic acid, 18:2n-6; a-linolenic acid, 18:3n-3; eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3; and docosahexaenoic acid, 22:6n-3) comprised primary analyses, and all other available fatty acids were secondary analyses.
Hazard ratios (HRs) for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality using Cox proportional hazards regression analyses, performed in 2015.
Among the 853 Swedish men, there were 605 deaths, of which 251 were cardiovascular deaths. After adjusting for risk factors, none of the 4 primary fatty acids were associated with cardiovascular mortality (HR, 0.92-1.05 for each standard deviation increase; P?=?.27). Linoleic acid was inversely associated with all-cause mortality (HR,?0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.98; P?=?.02) and directly associated with intake (P?
PubMed ID
27541681 View in PubMed
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Atopic sensitization during the first year of life in relation to long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels in human milk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33674
Source
Pediatr Res. 1998 Oct;44(4):478-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
K. Duchén
G. Yu
B. Björkstén
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Pediatr Res. 1998 Oct;44(4):478-84
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arachidonic Acids - analysis
Breast Feeding
Comparative Study
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - analysis
Fatty Acids, Omega-6
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - etiology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Milk, human - chemistry
Mothers
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Skin Tests
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
The levels of the long chain polyunsaturated n-6 and n-3 fatty acids (PUFA) were studied in colostrum and mature milk of 29 atopic and 29 nonatopic mothers and related to sensitization in their babies during the first 12 mo of life. The levels of alpha-linolenic acid (LNA) were lower (0.96 versus 1.23 weight percentage, p
PubMed ID
9773834 View in PubMed
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Combined effects of age and dietary fat on beta 1-receptors and Ca2+ channels in rat hearts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12091
Source
Am J Physiol. 1991 Jan;260(1 Pt 2):H66-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1991
Author
E. Gudmundsdottir
V E Benediktsdóttir
S. Gudbjarnason
Author Affiliation
Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavík.
Source
Am J Physiol. 1991 Jan;260(1 Pt 2):H66-72
Date
Jan-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Arachidonic Acids - metabolism
Calcium Channels - drug effects - physiology
Cell Membrane - metabolism - physiology - ultrastructure
Dietary Fats - analysis - pharmacology
Dihydroalprenolol - metabolism
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis - pharmacology
Heart - drug effects - physiology
Male
Myocardium - cytology - metabolism - ultrastructure
Nitrendipine - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred Strains
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
Male Wistar rats were fed a standard diet or diets supplemented with 10% butter, 10% corn oil, or 10% cod liver oil from the age of 2 mo. At 7 and 24 mo of age, the fatty acid composition of total phospholipids was determined in ventricular crude sarcolemma preparations; binding capacity and affinity (1/Kd) of [3H]dihydroalprenolol and [3H]nitrendipine binding were also determined. The arachidonic acid level was significantly higher at 24 mo than at 7 mo of age in the membrane phospholipids in rats fed no extra fat, but in rats fed fat-supplemented diets, age had no effect. Affinity of Ca2+ channels for [3H]nitrendipine decreased significantly in all dietary groups between 7 and 24 mo of age, whereas the affinity of beta 1-receptors for [3H]dihydroalprenolol increased in corn oil-fed rats. Density of beta 1-receptors decreased significantly in corn oil- and butter-fed rats and rats fed no extra fat between 7 and 24 mo of age, whereas the density of Ca2+ channels decreased significantly in corn oil-fed rats. We conclude that the antagonist binding properties of Ca2+ channels and beta 1-adrenergic receptors in rat hearts may change with age depending on the dietary fat.
PubMed ID
1847019 View in PubMed
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The composition of food consumed by Greenland Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5020
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1976;200(1-2):69-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
H O Bang
J. Dyerberg
N. Hjøorne
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1976;200(1-2):69-73
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cholesterol, Dietary - analysis
Comparative Study
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - analysis
Dietary Fats - analysis
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Fatty Acids - analysis
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Female
Food analysis
Greenland
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Time Factors
Abstract
Food specimens have been collected, by means of the double-portion technique, from Greenland Eskimo hunters and their wives, in all seven persons, on seven consecutive days. Their food was found to contain more protein and less carbohydrates than average Danish food and an almost equal amount of fat. Compared with Danish food, the fatty acid pattern of the consumed lipids--essentially of mammalian marine origin--showed a higher content of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (especially C20:5) and lower contents of linoleic and linolenic acids. However, the sum of the polyunsaturated fatty acids was smaller than in Danish food. Using Keys' formula, describing the serum cholesterol level as a function of the nutritional fatty acids, the essentially lower serum choelsterol level found in Greenland Eskimos was not explained by our findings. It is suggested instead to be a special metabolic effect of the long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids from marine mammals. There might be a similar effect on the plasma triglyceride and very low density lipoprotein concentrations, explaining the much lower plasma concentrations of these components in Eskimos than in Western populations. Our findings might have an essential bearing on the difference in morbidity from coronary atherosclerotic disease between these populations.
PubMed ID
961471 View in PubMed
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Distinctive lipid composition of the copepod Limnocalanus macrurus with a high abundance of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264291
Source
Lipids. 2014 Sep;49(9):919-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Minna Hiltunen
Ursula Strandberg
Markku Keinänen
Sami Taipale
Paula Kankaala
Source
Lipids. 2014 Sep;49(9):919-32
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Chromatography, Gas
Copepoda - chemistry - metabolism
Ecosystem
Esters - analysis
Fatty Acids - analysis - chemistry
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Finland
Lakes
Lipids - analysis - chemistry
Seasons
Sterols - analysis
Zooplankton
Abstract
We studied the copepod Limnocalanus macrurus for seasonal variation in the composition of fatty acids, wax esters and sterols in large boreal lakes, where it occurs as a glacial-relict. Vast wax ester reserves of Limnocalanus were accumulated in a period of only two months, and comprised mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and saturated fatty alcohols. In winter, the mobilization of wax esters was selective, and the proportion of long-chain polyunsaturated wax esters declined first. PUFA accounted for >50% of all fatty acids throughout the year reaching up to ca. 65% during late summer and fall. Long-chain PUFA 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 together comprised 17-40% of all fatty acids. The rarely reported C24 and C26 very-long-chain PUFA (VLC-PUFA) comprised 6.2 ± 3.4 % of all fatty acids in August and 2.1 ± 1.7% in September. The VLC-PUFA are presumably synthesized by Limnocalanus from shorter chain-length precursors because they were not found in the potential food sources. We hypothesize that these VLC-PUFA help Limnocalanus to maximize lipid reserves when food is abundant. Sterol content of Limnocalanus, consisting ca. 90% of cholesterol, did not show great seasonal variation. As a lipid-rich copepod with high abundance of PUFA, Limnocalanus is excellent quality food for fish. The VLC-PUFA were also detected in planktivorous fish, suggesting that these compounds can be used as a trophic marker indicating feeding on Limnocalanus.
PubMed ID
25092258 View in PubMed
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Dynamics of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids in phospholipids of heart muscle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12389
Source
J Intern Med Suppl. 1989;731:117-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
S. Gudbjarnason
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Science Institute, Dunhaga, Reykjavík.
Source
J Intern Med Suppl. 1989;731:117-28
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Animals, Newborn - metabolism
Catecholamines - pharmacology
Death, Sudden
Dietary Fats - pharmacology
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Growth
Heart - drug effects
Humans
Isoproterenol - toxicity
Membrane Lipids - metabolism
Myocardial Infarction - metabolism
Myocardium - analysis
Phospholipids - analysis
Rats
Stress - metabolism
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to describe the dynamics of n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in major phospholipids of heart muscle. The profile of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids was examined in rats in relation to various risk factors of coronary heart disease such as stress (catecholamines), ageing and dietary fat. The level of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids in cardiac phospholipids was also examined in relation to coronary heart disease and sudden cardiac death in man. Severe stress caused great changes in the fatty acid profile of phospholipids. Corresponding changes were observed during adaptation to neonatal stress. Rats fed diets containing cod liver oil, butter or corn oil showed different fatty acid composition of individual phospholipids in sarcolemma. Repeated epinephrine administration induced similar changes in the three dietary groups despite large differences in initial levels of individual n-3 and n-6 fatty acids. Fatal ventricular fibrillation in rats and sudden cardiac death in man were accompanied by a high ratio of 20:4 n-6/22:6 n-3. The balance between n-6 and n-3 fatty acids in cellular phospholipids seem to play an important role in sudden cardiac death.
PubMed ID
2650689 View in PubMed
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Effect of feeding intensity and time on feed on intramuscular fatty acid composition of Simmental bulls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61545
Source
J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl). 2004 Jun;88(5-6):179-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
A S Sami
C. Augustini
F J Schwarz
Author Affiliation
Department of Animal Science, Section of Animal Nutrition, Technical University of Munich, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany.
Source
J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl). 2004 Jun;88(5-6):179-87
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology - chemistry - metabolism
Animal Feed
Animal Nutrition
Animals
Body Composition - physiology
Cattle - anatomy & histology - metabolism
Fatty Acids - analysis
Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated - analysis
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Male
Meat - standards
Muscle, Skeletal - anatomy & histology - chemistry - metabolism
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Silage
Zea mays
Abstract
Seventy-two Simmental bulls, weighing 489 kg initially and approximately 15 months old, were divided into four groups to determine the effects of feeding intensity and time on feed on intramuscular fatty acid (FA) composition. Two groups of 18 bulls each were extensively (E) or intensively (I) fed on maize silage and concentrates with a daily gain of 943 g (E) or 1371 g (I). Half of each group were slaughtered after 100 days (S) or 138 days (L) on feed. In addition to carcass fatness parameters, intramuscular FA composition was also measured. Only small differences in the sum of saturated FA (SFA) percentages were found with 47.7 and 47.5% FA methyl esters (FAME) for SE and LE, respectively, and 48.7% FAME for each of SI and LI. Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) significantly increased with longer, and higher feeding intensity to 44.2% FAME (LI), whereas the other groups had similar contents of 41.9, 42.2 and 42.0% FAME (SE, LE and SI respectively). Polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) decreased with higher feeding intensity to 8.39% (SI) and 6.71% (LI) FAME (p
PubMed ID
15189422 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.