Skip header and navigation

Refine By

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Exploration of biomarkers for total fish intake in pregnant Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98999
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jan;13(1):54-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
Margaretha Haugen
Yngvar Thomassen
Dag G Ellingsen
Trond A Ydersbond
Tor-Arne Hagve
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food Safety and Nutrition, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, NO-04030 Oslo, Norway. anne.lise.brantsaeter@fhi.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jan;13(1):54-62
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arsenic - administration & dosage - blood
Biological Markers - blood - urine
Cohort Studies
Diet Records
Erythrocytes - chemistry
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage - analysis
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Iodine - administration & dosage - urine
Mercury - administration & dosage - blood
Norway
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Seafood - analysis
Selenium - administration & dosage - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Few biomarkers for dietary intake of various food groups have been established. The aim of the present study was to explore whether selenium (Se), iodine, mercury (Hg) or arsenic may serve as a biomarker for total fish and seafood intake in addition to the traditionally used n-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA. DESIGN: Intake of fish and seafood estimated by an FFQ was compared with intake assessed by a 4 d weighed food diary and with biomarkers in blood and urine. SETTING: Validation study in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). SUBJECTS: One hundred and nineteen women. RESULTS: Total fish/seafood intake (median 39 g/d) calculated with the MoBa FFQ was comparable to intake calculated by the food diary (median 30 g/d, rS = 0.37, P
Notes
RefSource: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Dec;12(12):2536-7
PubMed ID
19490733 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Importance of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids for visual function and development in newborn infants]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51105
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Apr 3;157(14):1987-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-3-1995
Author
F. Jonsbo
M H Jørgensen
K F Michaelsen
Author Affiliation
Rigshospitalet, København, neonatalafdeling GN.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Apr 3;157(14):1987-91
Date
Apr-3-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Development
Comparative Study
Denmark
Dietary Fats, Unsaturated - administration & dosage
English Abstract
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage - analysis
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - administration & dosage - analysis
Humans
Infant Food
Infant, Newborn
Milk, human - chemistry
Visual acuity
Abstract
Long-chain polyunsaturated n-3 and n-6 fatty acids are present in human milk, but not in the majority of infant formulas sold in Denmark. The content of the n-3 fatty acid DHA is high in retinal tissue and cerebral cortex. A number of studies have suggested that the content of DHA has a positive influence on the function of cell membranes. Preterm infants receiving human milk or infant formula with DHA have a better visual acuity than those receiving infant formula without DHA. In term infants receiving infant formula the content of DHA in plasma, red blood cell membranes and cerebral tissue is reduced compared to breast-fed infants.
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Jul 10;157(28):4039-417645083
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Sep 18;157(38):5259-617483043
PubMed ID
7740636 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intakes of essential n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids among pregnant Canadian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186949
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Feb;77(2):473-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Sheila M Innis
Sandra L Elias
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. sinnis@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Feb;77(2):473-8
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arachidonic Acid - administration & dosage
Brain - embryology - growth & development
Canada
Diet
Docosahexaenoic Acids - administration & dosage
Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Embryonic and Fetal Development - drug effects
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage - analysis - blood
Fatty Acids, Omega-6
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - administration & dosage - analysis - blood
Female
Food analysis
Humans
Linoleic Acid - administration & dosage
Phospholipids - chemistry
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
alpha-Linolenic Acid - administration & dosage
Abstract
Fetal growth requires n-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which is derived from the essential n-3 fatty acids in the maternal diet. DHA is accumulated in the developing brain and is critical for normal neural and visual function. Available estimates suggest that 67 mg DHA/d is accumulated by the fetus during the third trimester of gestation. Little is known about n-3 fatty acid intakes in pregnant women, although human milk concentrations of DHA have decreased in recent years.
We prospectively determined the n-3 and n-6 fatty acid intakes of 55 pregnant Canadian women.
A food-frequency questionnaire was completed at 28 and 35 wk, and plasma n-3 and n-6 fatty acids were measured at 35 wk gestation. The fatty acid composition of approximately 500 foods was analyzed to allow analysis of dietary intakes from specific foods.
Intakes, as a percentage of energy, were (macro x +/- SEM) total fat, 28.0 +/- 3.6%; saturated fat, 9.8 +/- 0.3%; monounsaturated fat, 11.2 +/- 0.4%; polyunsaturated fat, 4.7 +/- 0.2%; linoleic acid, 3.9 +/- 0.2%; and alpha-linolenic acid, 0.54 +/- 0.05%. The daily intakes (range) were 160 +/- 20 (24-524) mg DHA/d, 121 +/- 8 (15-301) mg arachidonic acid/d, and 78 +/- 2 (4-125) mg eicosapentaenoic acid/d. The plasma phospholipids had (mg/100 g fatty acid) 5.0 +/- 0.18 DHA, 8.7 +/- 0.18 arachidonic acid, and 0.52 +/- 0.32 eicosapentaenoic acid.
The low intake of DHA among some pregnant women highlights the need for studies to address the functional significance of maternal fat intakes during pregnancy on fetal development.
PubMed ID
12540410 View in PubMed
Less detail