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198 records – page 1 of 20.

Abusers' perceptions of the effect of their intimate partner violence on children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160721
Source
Violence Against Women. 2007 Nov;13(11):1179-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Emily F Rothman
David G Mandel
Jay G Silverman
Author Affiliation
Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Violence Against Women. 2007 Nov;13(11):1179-91
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Child
Child Abuse
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Welfare
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Spouse Abuse - psychology
United States
Abstract
Little is known about how intimate partner violence (IPV) abusers perceive the effect of their violence on their children. Analyzing the attitudes and behavioral intentions of 464 partner-abusive fathers, biological fathers were found to be more likely than social fathers to express concern about the effects of their abuse on their children. However, biological fathers were no more likely than social fathers to report intentions to stop their violence or otherwise take action to mitigate the harm of IPV exposure to their children. The findings suggest that fathers' statements of concern may be poor indicators of their intentions to refrain from abusive behavior.
PubMed ID
17951591 View in PubMed
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Adjusting to being a father to an infant born prematurely: experiences from Swedish fathers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86951
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):79-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Lindberg Birgitta
Axelsson Karin
Ohrling Kerstin
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden. birgitta.lindberg@ltu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):79-85
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Gender Identity
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Intensive Care, Neonatal - psychology
Life Change Events
Male
Narration
Neonatal Nursing
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Object Attachment
Paternal Behavior
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of being a father to a prematurely born infant. Eight fathers of prematurely born children were interviewed using a narrative approach, and a thematic content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The fathers described that the preterm birth gave them the chance to get to know their infant as they had to spend time at the intensive care unit. They also felt better educated by professionals who helped them take care of their infant. Their feelings and attachment for their infant increased over time and the fathers felt that they had a stronger bond with their child compared with friends who had babies born at term. As time passed, they became more confident as a father. In spite of the strain, the experience made them change as a person and they expressed having different values. The relationship with their partner was strengthened as they handled this situation together as a couple. However, the fathers felt fortunate despite everything and described having managed a prematurely born infant rather well. Although there are similarities between being a father to a child born at term and to one born preterm, it is significant to gain further knowledge about the specific experiences of fathers of prematurely born infants. The results of this study have implications for nurses working with families who have children born prematurely.
PubMed ID
18269426 View in PubMed
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Agreement between mothers', fathers', and teachers' ratings of behavioural and emotional problems in 3-5-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299314
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0206752
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Elisabet Fält
Thomas Wallby
Anna Sarkadi
Raziye Salari
Helena Fabian
Author Affiliation
Child Health and Parenting (CHAP), Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0206752
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Child Behavior
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis
Child, Preschool
Emotions
Fathers - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mothers - psychology
Observer Variation
Problem behavior
School Teachers - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), a valid and reliable instrument for measuring children's mental health, is available in parent- and teacher versions, making it an ideal tool for assessing behavioural and emotional problems in young children. However, few studies have evaluated inter-parent agreement on the SDQ, and in most studies on SDQ agreement, parent scores are either provided by only one parent or have been combined into one parent score. Furthermore, studies on SDQ inter-rater agreement usually only reflect degree of correlation, leaving the agreement between measurements unknown. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine both degree of correlation and agreement between parent and teacher SDQ reports, in a community sample of preschool-aged children in Sweden.
Data were obtained from the Children and Parents in Focus trial. The sample comprised 4,469 children 3-5-years-old. Mothers, fathers and preschool teachers completed the SDQ as part of the routine health check-ups at Child Health Centres. Inter-rater agreement was measured using Pearson correlation coefficient and intraclass correlation (ICC).
Results revealed poor/fair agreement between parent and teacher ratings (ICC 0.25-0.54) and good/excellent agreement between mother and father ratings (ICC 0.66-0.76). The highest level of agreement between parents and teachers was found for the hyperactivity and peer problem subscales, whereas the strongest agreement between parents was found for the hyperactivity and conduct subscales.
Low inter-rater agreement between parent and teacher ratings suggests that information from both teachers and parents is important when using the SDQ as a method to identify mental health problems in preschool children. Although mothers and fathers each provide unique information about their child's behaviour, good inter-parent agreement indicates that a single parent informant may be sufficient and simplify data collection.
PubMed ID
30383861 View in PubMed
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Alcoholic parents and their children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11663
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 1993 Sep-Oct;19(5):327-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Mützell
Author Affiliation
Department of Education, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 1993 Sep-Oct;19(5):327-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Comparative Study
Fathers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parent-Child Relations
Psychology, Social
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Social Conditions
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Some 211 male alcoholic in-patients were compared with a simple random sample of 200 men from Greater Stockholm. The group of male alcoholic in-patients and the random sample were subdivided with respect to alcohol consumption and use of hepatotoxic drugs: (IA) men from the random sample with low or moderate alcohol consumption and no use of drugs (n = 169); (IB) men from the random sample with low or moderate alcohol consumption with use of drugs (n = 31); (IIA) alcoholic in-patients with use of alcohol but no drugs (n = 171); (IIB) alcoholic in-patients with use of alcohol and drugs (n = 40). Earlier and more severe alcohol-related and anti-social problems were found among subjects with an alcoholic parent than among subjects without an alcoholic parent. The highest level of problems was noted for subjects with alcoholism in both parents and among the alcoholic in-patients. Groups which resembled each other were the drug users in the alcoholic group and in the general sample. Both inherited and environmental factors are important determinants and many of these individuals have psycho-social problems as children and adults. The children of those adults who used alcohol in combination with drugs (IIB) had most problems and the most severe problems. In the general population sample, those who used alcohol in combination with drugs (IB) had so many problems in the family and psycho-social problems themselves that they resembled the alcoholic in-patients and especially the group with high alcohol consumption in combination with drugs (IIB). A new finding is that the high-risk groups IB and IIB, who used both alcohol and drugs, had experienced a more disturbed school career and were more aggressive, had more nervous problems, and were more emotionally disturbed than the other groups. It is concluded that alcohol and drug use by parents may be predictive of future alcoholism in their children.
PubMed ID
8403239 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-induced psychotic disorder and delirium in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141116
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;197(3):200-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Jonna Perälä
Kimmo Kuoppasalmi
Sami Pirkola
Tommi Härkänen
Samuli Saarni
Annamari Tuulio-Henriksson
Satu Viertiö
Antti Latvala
Seppo Koskinen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Jaana Suvisaari
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Helsinki, Finland. jonna.perala@thl.fi
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;197(3):200-6
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium - epidemiology - therapy
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Ambulatory Care
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Epidemiologic Methods
Family Health
Fathers - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hallucinations - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Psychoses, Alcoholic - epidemiology - therapy
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Epidemiological data on alcohol-induced psychotic disorder and delirium (alcohol-induced psychotic syndrome, AIPS) are scarce.
To investigate the epidemiology of AIPS, the risk factors for developing AIPS among people with alcohol dependence, and mortality associated with alcohol dependence with or without AIPS, in a sample drawn from the general population of Finland.
A general population sample of 8028 persons were interviewed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and screened for psychotic disorders using multiple sources. Best-estimate diagnoses of psychotic disorders were made using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders and case notes. Data on hospital reatments and deaths were collected from national registers.
The lifetime prevalence was 0.5% for AIPS and was highest (1.8%) among men of working age. Younger age at onset of alcohol dependence, low socioeconomic status, father's mental health or alcohol problems and multiple hospital treatments were associated with increased risk of AIPS. Participants with a history of AIPS had considerable medical comorbidity, and 37% of them died during the 8-year follow-up.
Alcohol-induced psychotic disorder is a severe mental disorder with poor outcome.
PubMed ID
20807964 View in PubMed
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Analyzing participant produced photographs from an ethnographic study of fatherhood and smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159100
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2008 Oct;31(5):529-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
J L Oliffe
J L Bottorff
M. Kelly
M. Halpin
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2008 Oct;31(5):529-39
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude to Health
British Columbia
Data Collection - methods
Fathers - psychology
Freedom
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Knowledge
Male
Narration
Nursing Methodology Research
Paternal Behavior
Philosophy, Nursing
Photography - methods
Postmodernism
Power (Psychology)
Psychological Theory
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Research Design
Smoking - psychology
Software
Abstract
As part of an ongoing ethnographic study, we examined the photographs and narratives that new fathers produced to ascertain how they created social, psychological, and relational space for continued smoking. A four-part process for analyzing the photographs consisting of preview, review, cross-photo comparison, and theorizing revealed how visual data analyses can be used to develop insights into men's health behaviors and beliefs. There is ongoing epistemological debate and methodological uncertainty about how photographic data should be treated in health sciences research. By conducting formal layered analyses, researchers can expand and extend both what is said about, and interpreted through, photographs.
PubMed ID
18228606 View in PubMed
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'As long as they are safe--birth mode does not matter' Swedish fathers' experiences of decision-making around caesarean section.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261879
Source
Women Birth. 2014 Sep;27(3):208-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Margareta Johansson
Ingegerd Hildingsson
Jennifer Fenwick
Source
Women Birth. 2014 Sep;27(3):208-13
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section
Decision Making
Fathers - psychology
Fear
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Paternal Behavior
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
Decision-making in childbirth involves considerations about both the mother and her unborn baby's wellbeing. For men the safety of both is paramount.
To explore and describe Swedish fathers' beliefs and attitudes around the decision for a caesarean section.
Qualitative descriptive study. Twenty one Swedish men whose partners had experienced elective or emergency caesarean participated in a telephone interview. Thematic data analysis was used.
The theme, 'Childbirth is Risky', included "Caesarean birth has lots of advantages" and "Birth mode does not matter". In the context of having experienced a caesarean section male partners considered birth mode to be irrelevant. The majority considered caesarean to be a quick and efficient way of giving birth which equated to being safer. Most men could articulate some risks associated with caesarean but these were mainly minimised. The second theme, 'Simply a matter of trust: Birth mode is not my decision', reflected men's belief that they had little to contribute to the decisions made around birth mode. The decision for a caesarean section was considered to lie with the medical practitioner.
Mode of birth was regarded as unimportant. The recommendation for a caesarean section was readily accepted and appreciated, and shifted responsibility for birth to the medical practitioner. Involving men in the decision-making process by means of giving them information was valued. Men's limited knowledge about the risks of a caesarean may contribute to birth mode decisions. Professionals need to provide balanced and correct information within the context of individual circumstances.
PubMed ID
24793665 View in PubMed
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Association between mothers' and fathers' depressive symptoms, sense of coherence and perception of their child's temperament in early parenthood in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116914
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 May;41(3):233-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Birgitta Kerstis
Gabriella Engström
Birgitta Edlund
Clara Aarts
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden. birgitta.kerstis@ltv.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 May;41(3):233-9
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression - epidemiology
Depression, Postpartum - epidemiology
Fathers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parent-Child Relations
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sense of Coherence
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperament
Abstract
To examine whether there was any association between mothers' and fathers' post-partum depressive symptoms and sense of coherence and perception of their child's temperament. The hypotheses were that parents with depressive symptoms: 1) have more often a poor sense of coherence, and 2) perceive their child's temperament to be more difficult than parents without depressive symptoms.
A total of 401 Swedish-speaking couples, who were the parents of children born through the years 2004-2006 in the northern part of the county of Västmanland, Sweden, were invited to participate in the study. The parents answered 3 questionnaires including: at inclusion of the study: demographic data (n = 393 couples); at 3 months: the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the Sense of Coherence Scale (n = 308 couples); and at 18 months: the Infant Characteristics Questionnaire (n = 272 couples).
Depressive symptoms measured at 3 months, were reported by 17.7% of mothers and 8.7% of fathers, and correlated significantly between mothers and fathers within couples (rho = 0.165, p = 0.003). Mothers and fathers with depressive symptoms had a poorer sense of coherence (p
PubMed ID
23349164 View in PubMed
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Association between parental depressive symptoms and impaired bonding with the infant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279029
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):87-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Birgitta Kerstis
Clara Aarts
Carin Tillman
Hanna Persson
Gabriella Engström
Birgitta Edlund
John Öhrvik
Sara Sylvén
Alkistis Skalkidou
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):87-94
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child of Impaired Parents
Cohort Studies
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Object Attachment
Prenatal Care
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Impaired bonding with the infant is associated with maternal postpartum depression but has not been investigated extensively in fathers. The primary study aim was to evaluate associations between maternal and paternal depressive symptoms and impaired bonding with their infant. A secondary aim was to determine the associations between parents' marital problems and impaired bonding with the infant. The study is part of a population-based cohort project (UPPSAT) in Uppsala, Sweden. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum and the Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire at 6 months postpartum were completed by 727 couples. The prevalence of impaired bonding was highest among couples in which both spouses had depressive symptoms. Impaired bonding was associated with higher EPDS scores in both mothers and fathers, as well as with experiencing a deteriorated marital relationship. The association between maternal and paternal impaired bonding and the mothers' and fathers' EPDS scores remained significant even after adjustment for relevant confounding factors. Depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum are associated with impaired bonding with the infant at 6 months postpartum for both mothers and fathers. It is critical to screen for and prevent depressive symptoms in both parents during early parenthood.
PubMed ID
25854998 View in PubMed
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Association of IQ scores and school achievement with suicide in a 40-year follow-up of a Swedish cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93475
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2008 Aug;118(2):99-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Andersson L.
Allebeck P.
Gustafsson J-E
Gunnell D.
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. lena.andersson@socmed.gu.se
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2008 Aug;118(2):99-105
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cognition - physiology
Cohort Studies
Educational Status
Fathers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence - physiology
Intelligence Tests - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Few studies have investigated the association of childhood IQ and school achievement with suicide. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of childhood IQ with suicide in a cohort of Swedish women and men. METHOD: 21 809 subjects born in 1948 and 1953 who completed IQ and school tests at age 13 years have been followed until 2003. Information on paternal education and in-patient care for psychosis was linked using the Swedish personal identification number. RESULTS: There were 180 suicides amongst subjects with measured IQ. High IQ was associated with reduced suicide risk among men (OR per unit increase in age-adjusted model 0.90, 95% CI 0.83-0.99), while there was no statistical evidence of an association in women (OR 1.04, 95% CI 0.90-1.20). Among men with a history of psychosis, high IQ was associated with an increased risk of suicide. CONCLUSION: Low childhood IQ at age 13 years is associated with an increased risk of suicide in men but not in women; however, amongst those with psychosis, low IQ appears to be protective.
PubMed ID
18331576 View in PubMed
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198 records – page 1 of 20.