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Abstinence in late adolescence--antecedents to and covariates of a sober lifestyle and its consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11379
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Jul;41(1):113-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
H. Leifman
E. Kühlhorn
P. Allebeck
S. Andréasson
A. Romelsjö
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Jul;41(1):113-21
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Fathers
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental health
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Behavior
Sweden
Temperance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of this study was first to compare 18-19-year-old male abstainers with alcohol consumers, and especially light consumers, regarding degree of sociability as indicated by their (in)security in the company of others, their number of close friends, intimate conversations with friends and their popularity in school. Secondly, we analysed the importance of antecedents to and covariates of abstinence. In addition, the significant antecedents and covariates gave us information as to abstinence patterns. The study was based on a survey of all Swedish males, 18-19 years old, conscripted for military service in 1969-70. Data had been collected by means of questionnaires and psychological interviews, giving measures of each respondent's social background, psychiatric/psychological and psychosomatic health status, substance use, deviant behaviour and degree of sociability. Poor sociability was more common among the abstainers than among all the other categories of drinkers, including the light consumers. The conscripts' social background, and especially their fathers' drinking habits, had the strongest effects in explaining abstinence. Sixty-two per cent of all abstainers had non-drinking fathers, compared to 28% of the light consumers. As to the majority of abstainers, this indicates a link between the social background of temperance and their own reported abstinence. Their poor sociability could be a consequence of abstaining at a young age when abstinence is uncommon. Those who abstained despite a drinking father showed a worsening psychological status, suggesting a link between psychologically impaired health, poor sociability and abstinence. Though the abstainers were the least sociable, the difference between the abstainers, the light consumers and the moderate consumers in other categories were generally small.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7667664 View in PubMed
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Abusers' perceptions of the effect of their intimate partner violence on children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160721
Source
Violence Against Women. 2007 Nov;13(11):1179-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Emily F Rothman
David G Mandel
Jay G Silverman
Author Affiliation
Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Violence Against Women. 2007 Nov;13(11):1179-91
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Child
Child Abuse
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Welfare
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Spouse Abuse - psychology
United States
Abstract
Little is known about how intimate partner violence (IPV) abusers perceive the effect of their violence on their children. Analyzing the attitudes and behavioral intentions of 464 partner-abusive fathers, biological fathers were found to be more likely than social fathers to express concern about the effects of their abuse on their children. However, biological fathers were no more likely than social fathers to report intentions to stop their violence or otherwise take action to mitigate the harm of IPV exposure to their children. The findings suggest that fathers' statements of concern may be poor indicators of their intentions to refrain from abusive behavior.
PubMed ID
17951591 View in PubMed
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Accounting for structural and exchange mobility in models of status attainment: Social fluidity in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294359
Source
Soc Sci Res. 2017 01; 61:112-125
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
01-2017
Author
Jorge Rodríguez Menés
Author Affiliation
Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain. Electronic address: jorge.rodriguez@upf.edu.
Source
Soc Sci Res. 2017 01; 61:112-125
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Children
Denmark
Educational Status
Employment
Father-Child Relations
Fathers
Germany
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Occupations
Social Class
Spain
Surveys and Questionnaires
United Kingdom
Abstract
This paper proposes a new method to distinguish structural from exchange mobility in status attainment models with interval endogenous variables. In order to measure structural mobility, the paper proposes to trace occupational and educational changes across generations using information provided by children about their fathers. The validity of the method is assessed by comparing the effects of father's socio-economic status and education on son's status and educational attainments, net of occupational upgrading and educational expansion, in five European countries: Britain, Denmark, Germany, Norway, and Spain, using data from the 2005 EU-SILC survey. The results show that the effect of father's on son's ISEI weakens greatly in all countries after considering occupational upgrading, and that much of father's influence over sons occurs by directing them towards occupations with good economic prospects. Useful extensions to the method are discussed in the conclusions.
PubMed ID
27886723 View in PubMed
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Adjusting to being a father to an infant born prematurely: experiences from Swedish fathers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86951
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):79-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Lindberg Birgitta
Axelsson Karin
Ohrling Kerstin
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden. birgitta.lindberg@ltu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):79-85
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Gender Identity
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Intensive Care, Neonatal - psychology
Life Change Events
Male
Narration
Neonatal Nursing
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Object Attachment
Paternal Behavior
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of being a father to a prematurely born infant. Eight fathers of prematurely born children were interviewed using a narrative approach, and a thematic content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The fathers described that the preterm birth gave them the chance to get to know their infant as they had to spend time at the intensive care unit. They also felt better educated by professionals who helped them take care of their infant. Their feelings and attachment for their infant increased over time and the fathers felt that they had a stronger bond with their child compared with friends who had babies born at term. As time passed, they became more confident as a father. In spite of the strain, the experience made them change as a person and they expressed having different values. The relationship with their partner was strengthened as they handled this situation together as a couple. However, the fathers felt fortunate despite everything and described having managed a prematurely born infant rather well. Although there are similarities between being a father to a child born at term and to one born preterm, it is significant to gain further knowledge about the specific experiences of fathers of prematurely born infants. The results of this study have implications for nurses working with families who have children born prematurely.
PubMed ID
18269426 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' prospective screen time by gender and parental education, the mediation of parental influences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112462
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10:89
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Torunn H Totland
Mona Bjelland
Nanna Lien
Ingunn H Bergh
Mekdes K Gebremariam
May Grydeland
Yngvar Ommundsen
Lene F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, NO-0316 Oslo, Norway. t.h.totland@medisin.uio.no
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10:89
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Child
Child Behavior
Computers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Fathers
Female
Gender Identity
Health Behavior
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mothers
Norway
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Report
Sex Factors
Television
Video Games
Abstract
The present study investigated associations in gender dyads of parents' and adolescents' time spent on television and video viewing (TV/DVD), and computer and electronic game use (PC/games) at the ages of 11 and 13 years. Possible mediating effects of parental modelling and parental regulation in the relationship between parental education and adolescents' prospective TV/DVD and PC/game time were further examined.
A total of 908 adolescents, participating at both ages 11 and 13 years in the Norwegian HEalth In Adolescents (HEIA) cohort study (2007-2009), were included in the analyses. Data on adolescents', mothers' and fathers' self reported time spent on TV/DVD and PC/games were measured at both time points by questionnaires. Correlation coefficients were used to examine gender dyads of parents' and adolescents' reports. Mediation analyses using linear regression investigated possible mediation effects of parental modelling and parental regulation in the prospective relationship between parental education and adolescents' time spent on TV/DVD and PC/games between the ages of 11 and 13 years.
Correlations of screen time behaviours in gender dyads of parents and adolescents showed significant associations in time spent on TV/DVD at the age of 11 and 13 years. Associations between mothers and sons and between fathers and daughters were also observed in time spent on PC/games at the age of 11 years. Maternal and paternal modelling was further found to mediate the relationship between parental education and adolescents' prospective TV/DVD time between the ages of 11 and 13 years. No mediation effect was observed for parental regulation, however a decrease in both maternal and paternal regulation at the age of 11 years significantly predicted more TV/DVD time among adolescents at the age of 13 years.
Cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships were observed in gender dyads of parents' and adolescents' screen time behaviours at the ages of 11 and 13 years, and further studies including both parents and their children should be emphasized. Moreover, maternal and paternal modelling were found to be important target variables in interventions aiming to reduce social differences by parental education in adolescents' prospective time spent on TV/DVD.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23829607 View in PubMed
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Adolescent suicide attempters: what predicts future suicidal acts?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79019
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2006 Dec;36(6):638-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Groholt Berit
Ekeberg Øivind
Haldorsen Tor
Author Affiliation
Sogn Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Oslo, Norway. berit.groholt@medisin.uio.no
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2006 Dec;36(6):638-50
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Father-Child Relations
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Norway
Recurrence - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Statistics
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Predictors for repetition of suicide attempts were evaluated among 92 adolescent suicide attempters 9 years after an index suicide attempt (90% females). Five were dead, two by suicide. Thirty-one (42%) of 73 had repeated a suicide attempt. In multiple Cox regression analysis, four factors had an independent predictive effect: comorbid disorders, hopelessness, having ever received treatment for mental or behavior problems, and having a father exerting control without affection. Prediction on an individual level was difficult. Since almost half repeated a suicidal act, the best strategy is to evaluate all adolescent suicide attempters thoroughly and provide treatment as needed.
PubMed ID
17250468 View in PubMed
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Adoptive paternal age and risk of psychosis in adoptees: a register based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119810
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e47334
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mats Ek
Susanne Wicks
Cecilia Magnusson
Christina Dalman
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. mats.ek@ki.se
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e47334
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption - psychology
Age Factors
Father-Child Relations
Humans
Logistic Models
Psychology
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The association between advancing paternal age and increased risk of schizophrenia in the off-spring is well established. The underlying mechanisms are unknown. In order to investigate whether the psychosocial environment associated with growing up with an aged father explains the increased risk we conducted a study of all adoptive children in Sweden from 1955-1985 (n =31 188). Their risk of developing schizophrenia or non-affective psychosis in relation to advancing age of their adoptive fathers' was examined. We found no association between risk of psychoses and advancing adoptive paternal age. There was no support of psychosocial environmental factors explaining the "paternal age effect".
Notes
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PubMed ID
23071791 View in PubMed
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555 records – page 1 of 56.