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Abusers' perceptions of the effect of their intimate partner violence on children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160721
Source
Violence Against Women. 2007 Nov;13(11):1179-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Emily F Rothman
David G Mandel
Jay G Silverman
Author Affiliation
Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Violence Against Women. 2007 Nov;13(11):1179-91
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Child
Child Abuse
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Welfare
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Spouse Abuse - psychology
United States
Abstract
Little is known about how intimate partner violence (IPV) abusers perceive the effect of their violence on their children. Analyzing the attitudes and behavioral intentions of 464 partner-abusive fathers, biological fathers were found to be more likely than social fathers to express concern about the effects of their abuse on their children. However, biological fathers were no more likely than social fathers to report intentions to stop their violence or otherwise take action to mitigate the harm of IPV exposure to their children. The findings suggest that fathers' statements of concern may be poor indicators of their intentions to refrain from abusive behavior.
PubMed ID
17951591 View in PubMed
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Accounting for structural and exchange mobility in models of status attainment: Social fluidity in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294359
Source
Soc Sci Res. 2017 01; 61:112-125
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
01-2017
Author
Jorge Rodríguez Menés
Author Affiliation
Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain. Electronic address: jorge.rodriguez@upf.edu.
Source
Soc Sci Res. 2017 01; 61:112-125
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Children
Denmark
Educational Status
Employment
Father-Child Relations
Fathers
Germany
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Occupations
Social Class
Spain
Surveys and Questionnaires
United Kingdom
Abstract
This paper proposes a new method to distinguish structural from exchange mobility in status attainment models with interval endogenous variables. In order to measure structural mobility, the paper proposes to trace occupational and educational changes across generations using information provided by children about their fathers. The validity of the method is assessed by comparing the effects of father's socio-economic status and education on son's status and educational attainments, net of occupational upgrading and educational expansion, in five European countries: Britain, Denmark, Germany, Norway, and Spain, using data from the 2005 EU-SILC survey. The results show that the effect of father's on son's ISEI weakens greatly in all countries after considering occupational upgrading, and that much of father's influence over sons occurs by directing them towards occupations with good economic prospects. Useful extensions to the method are discussed in the conclusions.
PubMed ID
27886723 View in PubMed
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Adjusting to being a father to an infant born prematurely: experiences from Swedish fathers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86951
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):79-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Lindberg Birgitta
Axelsson Karin
Ohrling Kerstin
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden. birgitta.lindberg@ltu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):79-85
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Gender Identity
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Intensive Care, Neonatal - psychology
Life Change Events
Male
Narration
Neonatal Nursing
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Object Attachment
Paternal Behavior
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of being a father to a prematurely born infant. Eight fathers of prematurely born children were interviewed using a narrative approach, and a thematic content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The fathers described that the preterm birth gave them the chance to get to know their infant as they had to spend time at the intensive care unit. They also felt better educated by professionals who helped them take care of their infant. Their feelings and attachment for their infant increased over time and the fathers felt that they had a stronger bond with their child compared with friends who had babies born at term. As time passed, they became more confident as a father. In spite of the strain, the experience made them change as a person and they expressed having different values. The relationship with their partner was strengthened as they handled this situation together as a couple. However, the fathers felt fortunate despite everything and described having managed a prematurely born infant rather well. Although there are similarities between being a father to a child born at term and to one born preterm, it is significant to gain further knowledge about the specific experiences of fathers of prematurely born infants. The results of this study have implications for nurses working with families who have children born prematurely.
PubMed ID
18269426 View in PubMed
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Adolescent suicide attempters: what predicts future suicidal acts?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79019
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2006 Dec;36(6):638-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Groholt Berit
Ekeberg Øivind
Haldorsen Tor
Author Affiliation
Sogn Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Oslo, Norway. berit.groholt@medisin.uio.no
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2006 Dec;36(6):638-50
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Father-Child Relations
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Norway
Recurrence - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Statistics
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Predictors for repetition of suicide attempts were evaluated among 92 adolescent suicide attempters 9 years after an index suicide attempt (90% females). Five were dead, two by suicide. Thirty-one (42%) of 73 had repeated a suicide attempt. In multiple Cox regression analysis, four factors had an independent predictive effect: comorbid disorders, hopelessness, having ever received treatment for mental or behavior problems, and having a father exerting control without affection. Prediction on an individual level was difficult. Since almost half repeated a suicidal act, the best strategy is to evaluate all adolescent suicide attempters thoroughly and provide treatment as needed.
PubMed ID
17250468 View in PubMed
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Adoptive paternal age and risk of psychosis in adoptees: a register based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119810
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e47334
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mats Ek
Susanne Wicks
Cecilia Magnusson
Christina Dalman
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. mats.ek@ki.se
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e47334
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption - psychology
Age Factors
Father-Child Relations
Humans
Logistic Models
Psychology
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The association between advancing paternal age and increased risk of schizophrenia in the off-spring is well established. The underlying mechanisms are unknown. In order to investigate whether the psychosocial environment associated with growing up with an aged father explains the increased risk we conducted a study of all adoptive children in Sweden from 1955-1985 (n =31 188). Their risk of developing schizophrenia or non-affective psychosis in relation to advancing age of their adoptive fathers' was examined. We found no association between risk of psychoses and advancing adoptive paternal age. There was no support of psychosocial environmental factors explaining the "paternal age effect".
Notes
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PubMed ID
23071791 View in PubMed
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Age at menarche and current substance use among Canadian adolescent girls: results of a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126099
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:195
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Ban Al-Sahab
Chris I Ardern
Mazen J Hamadeh
Hala Tamim
Author Affiliation
Kinesiology & Health Science, York University, Ontario, Canada. bsahab@yorku.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:195
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Father-Child Relations
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Menarche - physiology - psychology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sampling Studies
Self Report
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Substance use is among the key public health threats that find its genesis during adolescence. Timing of puberty has been lately researched as a potential predictor of subsequent substance abuse. The present study, therefore, aims to assess the effect of age at menarche on current practices of smoking, alcohol drinking and drug use among 14-15 year old Canadian girls.
The analysis of the study was based on all female respondents aged 14 to 15 years during Cycle 4 (2000/2001) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children & Youth (NLSCY). The main independent variable was age at menarche assessed as the month and year of the occurrence of the first menstrual cycle. The dependent variables were current smoking, heavy alcohol drinking in the past 12 months and drug use in the past 12 months. Three logistic regression models were performed to investigate the association between age at menarche and each of the substance use outcomes, adjusting for possible confounders. Bootstrapping was performed to account for the complex sampling design.
The total weighted sample included in the analysis represented 295,042 Canadian girls. The prevalence of current smokers, heavy drinkers (drunk in the past 12 months) and drug users in the past 12 months was approximately 22%, 38% and 26%, respectively. After adjusting of all potential confounders, no association was found between age at menarche and any of the substance use outcomes. School performance and relationship with the father, however, stood out as the main variables to be associated with smoking, heavy drinking and drug use.
Qualitative studies understanding the social and psychological changes experienced by early maturing Canadian adolescents are warranted to identify other correlates or pathways to substance use in this higher risk population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22424106 View in PubMed
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Association between parental depressive symptoms and impaired bonding with the infant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279029
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):87-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Birgitta Kerstis
Clara Aarts
Carin Tillman
Hanna Persson
Gabriella Engström
Birgitta Edlund
John Öhrvik
Sara Sylvén
Alkistis Skalkidou
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):87-94
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child of Impaired Parents
Cohort Studies
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Object Attachment
Prenatal Care
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Impaired bonding with the infant is associated with maternal postpartum depression but has not been investigated extensively in fathers. The primary study aim was to evaluate associations between maternal and paternal depressive symptoms and impaired bonding with their infant. A secondary aim was to determine the associations between parents' marital problems and impaired bonding with the infant. The study is part of a population-based cohort project (UPPSAT) in Uppsala, Sweden. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum and the Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire at 6 months postpartum were completed by 727 couples. The prevalence of impaired bonding was highest among couples in which both spouses had depressive symptoms. Impaired bonding was associated with higher EPDS scores in both mothers and fathers, as well as with experiencing a deteriorated marital relationship. The association between maternal and paternal impaired bonding and the mothers' and fathers' EPDS scores remained significant even after adjustment for relevant confounding factors. Depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum are associated with impaired bonding with the infant at 6 months postpartum for both mothers and fathers. It is critical to screen for and prevent depressive symptoms in both parents during early parenthood.
PubMed ID
25854998 View in PubMed
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Associations Between Parental Attachment and Course of Depression Between Adolescence and Young Adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275633
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2015 Aug;46(4):632-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Tea Agerup
Stian Lydersen
Jan Wallander
Anne Mari Sund
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2015 Aug;46(4):632-42
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Father-Child Relations
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mother-Child Relations - psychology
Norway
Peer Group
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Psychometrics
Reactive Attachment Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Statistics as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
A study of the associations of maternal, paternal and peer attachment with the course of depression from adolescence to young adulthood. In the Youth and Mental Health study 242 adolescents completed the Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Present and Lifetime version for depressive disorders at age 15 and 20. Attachment was measured with the inventory for parent and peer attachment, separately for mother, father, and peers, at age 15. Multinomial logistic regression, indicated insecure attachment relationships with both parents, but not with peers, and were associated with the course of depression. Less secure attachment to mothers was associated with becoming depressed. Less secure attachment to both parents was associated with becoming well and remaining depressed. These results suggest attachment relationships with parents as potential influences on the course of depression and may provide important framework for clinical work with adolescents and young adults.
PubMed ID
25319511 View in PubMed
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Becoming a father is an emotional roller coaster - an analysis of first-time fathers' blogs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266402
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2014 May;23(9-10):1309-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Liselotte Asenhed
Jennie Kilstam
Siw Alehagen
Christina Baggens
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2014 May;23(9-10):1309-17
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Blogging
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Nurse's Role
Pregnancy
Sweden
Abstract
To identify and describe the process of fatherhood during the partner's pregnancy among expectant, first-time fathers.
Pregnancy seems to be a demanding period for expectant fathers, and this period is a part of their transition to fatherhood. Blogs can be seen as personal diaries and offer an alternative method of collecting data as they are an arena for sharing experiences and narratives.
An explorative qualitative design.
Blogs from the Internet by eleven first-time fathers living in Sweden were included in the study. Qualitative content analysis was used for the analysis of the blogs.
A theme emerged expressing the latent content of the text: 'Becoming a father for the first time is an emotional roller coaster where the role of the expectant father is not obvious' and five different categories describing the manifest content: the pregnancy, a new life, to make the child real, preparations for the delivery and the arrival of the child, and a new role in life.
The metaphor 'roller coaster' indicates the tension between different feelings about the men's future as fathers. They are searching for answers on how to be a good father. They feel excluded when they visit antenatal care centres and have difficulties finding out how to support their partner. This is an existential period when they understand themselves as adults and also miss relatives who have died. During pregnancy, the men start to communicate with their child, and this interaction gives a sense of reality and creates hope and joy about being a father.
Staff involved in antenatal care can use the knowledge from this study when meeting with expectant fathers. Perspectives expressed in blogs may enhance the professionals' understanding that the transition process of fatherhood is complex.
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Nurs. 2015 Jul;18(3):6925326502
PubMed ID
23815546 View in PubMed
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91 records – page 1 of 10.