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The -250G>A promoter variant in hepatic lipase associates with elevated fasting serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol modulated by interaction with physical activity in a study of 16,156 Danish subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85800
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Jun;93(6):2294-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Grarup Niels
Andreasen Camilla H
Andersen Mette K
Albrechtsen Anders
Sandbaek Annelli
Lauritzen Torsten
Borch-Johnsen Knut
Jørgensen Torben
Schmitz Ole
Hansen Torben
Pedersen Oluf
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center, Niels Steensens Vej 1, Gentofte, Denmark. ngrp@steno.dk
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Jun;93(6):2294-9
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Fasting - blood
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Screening
Genotype
Heterozygote
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Linkage Disequilibrium
Lipase - genetics
Motor Activity - genetics - physiology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Abstract
CONTEXT: Hepatic lipase plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein by involvement in reverse cholesterol transport and the formation of atherogenic small dense low-density lipoprotein. OBJECTIVES: The objective was to investigate the impact of variants in LIPC on metabolic traits and type 2 diabetes in a large sample of Danes. Because behavioral factors influence hepatic lipase activity, we furthermore examined possible gene-environment interactions in the population-based Inter99 study. DESIGN: The LIPC -250G>A (rs2070895) variant was genotyped in the Inter99 study (n = 6070), the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen Detected Diabetes in Primary Care Denmark screening cohort of individuals with risk factors for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (n = 8662), and in additional type 2 diabetic patients (n = 1,064) and glucose-tolerant control subjects (n = 360). RESULTS: In the Inter99 study, the A allele of rs2070895 associated with a 0.057 mmol/liter [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.039-0.075] increase in fasting serum HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) (P = 8 x 10(-10)) supported by association in the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen Detected Diabetes in Primary Care study [0.038 mmol/liter per allele (95% CI 0.024-0.053); P = 2 x 10(-7)). The allelic effect on HDL-c was modulated by interaction with self-reported physical activity (P(interaction) = 0.002) because vigorous physically active homozygous A-allele carriers had a 0.30 mmol/liter (95% CI 0.22-0.37) increase in HDL-c compared with homozygous G-allele carriers. CONCLUSIONS: We validate the association of LIPC promoter variation with fasting serum HDL-c and present data supporting an interaction with physical activity implying an increased effect on HDL-c in vigorous physically active subjects carrying the -250 A allele. This interaction may have potential implications for public health and disease prevention.
PubMed ID
18364377 View in PubMed
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Abnormal glucose regulation in patients with acute ST- elevation myocardial infarction-a cohort study on 224 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90209
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2009;8:6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Knudsen Eva C
Seljeflot Ingebjørg
Abdelnoor Michael
Eritsland Jan
Mangschau Arild
Arnesen Harald
Andersen Geir O
Author Affiliation
Center for Clinical Heart Research, Ullevål University Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. evacecilie.knudsen@ulleval.no
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2009;8:6
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diagnostic Tests, Routine
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Intolerance - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Unnecessary Procedures
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A high prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance and unknown type 2-diabetes in patients with coronary heart disease and no previous diagnosis of diabetes have been reported. The aims of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of abnormal glucose regulation (AGR) 3 months after an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients without known glucometabolic disturbance, to evaluate the reliability of a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) performed very early after an acute STEMI to predict the presence of AGR at 3 months, and to study other potential predictors measured in-hospital for AGR at 3 months. METHODS: This was an observational cohort study prospectively enrolling 224 STEMI patients treated with primary PCI. An OGTT was performed very early after an acute STEMI and was repeated in 200 patients after 3 months. We summarised the exact agreement observed, and assessed the observed reproducibility of the OGTTs performed in-hospital and at follow up. The patients were classified into glucometabolic categories defined according to the World Health Organisation criteria. AGR was defined as the sum of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2-diabetes. RESULTS: The prevalence of AGR at three months was 24.9% (95% CI 19.1, 31.4%), reduced from 46.9% (95% CI 40.2, 53.6) when measured in-hospital. Only, 108 of 201 (54%) patients remained in the same glucometabolic category after a repeated OGTT. High levels of HbA1c and admission plasma glucose in-hospital significantly predicted AGR at 3 months (p
PubMed ID
19183453 View in PubMed
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Acarbose for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: facts and interpretations concerning the critical analysis of the STOP-NIDDM Trial data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179962
Source
Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):969-75; discussion 976-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
J-L Chiasson
R G Josse
R. Gomis
M. Hanefeld
A. Karasik
M. Laakso
Author Affiliation
Research Centre, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal-Hôtel-Dieu, Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, 3850 St. Urbain Street, Rm 8-202, Montreal, Quebec H2W 1T7, Canada. jean.louis.chiasson@umontreal.ca
Source
Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):969-75; discussion 976-7
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acarbose - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - chemistry
Body Weight - drug effects
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Clinical Protocols
Data Collection - ethics - methods
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Double-Blind Method
Eating - physiology
Ethics, Clinical
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Intolerance - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Risk Reduction Behavior
Stroke - classification - etiology - prevention & control
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Withholding Treatment - ethics
Abstract
The STOP-NIDDM Trial has shown that acarbose treatment in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance is associated with a significant risk reduction in the development of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular complications. Kaiser and Sawicki have accused the investigators of the STOP-NIDDM Trial of major biases in the conduct of the study, of manipulating the data and of conflict of interest. The aim of this paper is to present data and explanations refuting these allegations. In the STOP-NIDDM Trial, 61 subjects were excluded from the efficacy analysis before unblinding for legitimate reasons: failure to satisfy major entry criteria (n=17) and lack of post-randomisation data (n=44). Blinding and randomisation were carried out by an independent biostatistician. Titration of placebo/acarbose is well described in the protocol and in the study design paper. Of the study population, 9.3% had a fasting plasma glucose of > or =7.0 mmol/l at screening and could have been diabetic according to the new diagnostic criteria. However, even if these subjects are excluded, patients having acarbose treatment still saw a significant risk reduction in the development of diabetes (p=0.0027). The changes in weight are consistent in different publications and are related to different times of follow-up and assessment. Weight change does have an effect on the development of diabetes, but acarbose treatment is still effective even after adjusting for this (p=0.0063). The cardiovascular endpoints were a clearly designated assessment in the original protocol, and only those defined in the protocol and ascertained by the independent Cardiovascular Event Adjudication Committee were used in the analysis. Hypertension was defined according to the most recent diagnostic criteria. The STOP-NIDDM Trial results are scientifically sound and credible. The investigators stand strongly behind these results demonstrating that acarbose treatment is associated with a delay in the development of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular complications in a high-risk population with IGT.
Notes
Comment In: Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):976-715150689
Comment On: Diabetologia. 2004 Mar;47(3):575-8014727025
PubMed ID
15164169 View in PubMed
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Age and gender differences in the association between Nt-proBNP and glucometabolic disturbances.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134279
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2011 Oct;45(5):294-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Margret Leosdottir
Ronnie Willenheimer
Christian Hall
Solve Tjora
Johan Malm
Olle Melander
Peter M Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. Margret.Leosdottir@med.lu.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2011 Oct;45(5):294-300
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fasting - blood
Female
Glucose Metabolism Disorders - blood - diagnosis
Heart Diseases - blood - diagnosis - physiopathology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Peptide Fragments - blood
Predictive value of tests
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Glucometabolic disturbances are associated with myocardial dysfunction. Brain natriuretic peptides (BNP) are used for detecting myocardial dysfunction in clinical practice. However, studies on elderly subjects and gender-specific analyses are sparse.
We examined cross-sectional associations between Nt-proBNP and 1) fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and 2) categories of glucometabolic disturbances, in middle-aged and older subjects (1266 men, 526 women), applying multivariate linear regression analysis.
FPG was positively correlated with Nt-proBNP among middle-aged men (p = 0.04) and negatively albeit non-significantly (p = 0.1) among middle-aged women. Weaker non-significant correlations were seen among older subjects. Middle-aged men with new-onset and prevalent diabetes had higher Nt-proBNP than the reference group (FPG =5.0 mmol/L): 9.53 (p = 0.002) and 8.23 (p = 0.02) vs. 5.71 pmol/L. No differences in Nt-proBNP between categories of glucometabolic disturbance were observed among older men or women.
The results indicate an age- and gender difference in the ability of Nt-proBNP to identify myocardial dysfunction in relation to glucometabolic disturbances. Therefore, Nt-proBNP should be used with caution as a general surrogate marker for myocardial dysfunction in this setting.
PubMed ID
21604967 View in PubMed
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Alimentary lipemia, postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and common carotid intima-media thickness in healthy, middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10634
Source
Circulation. 1999 Aug 17;100(7):723-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-17-1999
Author
S. Boquist
G. Ruotolo
R. Tang
J. Björkegren
M G Bond
U. de Faire
F. Karpe
A. Hamsten
Author Affiliation
Atherosclerosis Research Unit, King Gustaf V Research Institute, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Circulation. 1999 Aug 17;100(7):723-8
Date
Aug-17-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Area Under Curve
Arteriosclerosis - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Blood pressure
Body constitution
Carotid Artery, Common - ultrasonography - ultrastructure
Carotid Stenosis - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Chylomicrons - blood
Dietary Fats - pharmacokinetics
Eating - physiology
Fasting - blood
Genotype
Homeostasis
Humans
Insulin - blood
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Lipoproteins, VLDL - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Proinsulin - blood
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Tunica Intima - ultrastructure
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Alimentary lipemia has been associated with coronary heart disease and common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). This study was designed to investigate the relations of subclasses of postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) with IMT. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ninety-six healthy 50-year-old men with an apolipoprotein (apo) E3/E3 genotype underwent an oral fat tolerance test and B-mode carotid ultrasound examination. The apo B-48 and apo B-100 contents of each fraction of TRLs were determined as a measure of chylomicron remnant and VLDL particle concentrations. In the fasting state, LDL cholesterol (P
PubMed ID
10449694 View in PubMed
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An observational study comparing 2-hour 75-g oral glucose tolerance with fasting plasma glucose in pregnant women: both poorly predictive of birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186618
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):403-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-2003
Author
Christian Ouzilleau
Marie-Andrée Roy
Louiselle Leblanc
André Carpentier
Pierre Maheux
Author Affiliation
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC.
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):403-9
Date
Feb-18-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Diabetes, Gestational - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Infant, Newborn
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Mass Screening
Maternal Welfare
Parity
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Quebec
ROC Curve
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Smoking
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
The definition and treatment of glucose intolerance during pregnancy are matters of intense controversy. Our goal was to examine the value of the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in terms of its ability to predict birth weight percentile in a group of women with singleton pregnancies who received minimal treatment for their glucose intolerance.
We reviewed the results of OGTTs performed between 24 and 28 weeks' gestation in a group of 300 consecutive high-risk women (mean age 29.5 years [95% confidence interval, CI, 28.9-30.1]; parity 1.5 [95% CI 1.4-1.7]) whose plasma glucose level 1 hour after a randomly administered 50-g glucose load was 8.0 mmol/L or above. These data were compared with results for a randomly selected control group of 300 women whose plasma glucose level 1 hour after a 50-g glucose load was less than 8.0 mmol/L (mean age 28.0 years [95% CI 27.4-28.6]; parity 1.5 [95% CI 1.3-1.6]).
For 76 (25.3%) of the 300 high-risk women, the plasma glucose level 2 hours after a 75-g glucose load (confirmatory OGTT) was 7.8 mmol/L or more, but only 6 of these were treated with insulin, which emphasizes the low level of intervention in this group. Thirty (10.0%) of the neonates in this group were large for gestational age (LGA; adjusted weight at or above the 90th percentile). This proportion did not significantly differ from the proportion for the control group (25 or 8.3%). After exclusion of the 6 insulin-treated women, simple correlations between birth weight percentile and fasting or 2-hour plasma glucose levels were very weak (r = 0.23 and 0.16 respectively; p
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):421-512591782
Comment In: CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):429-3112591783
PubMed ID
12591779 View in PubMed
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Are even impaired fasting blood glucose levels preoperatively associated with increased mortality after CABG surgery?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47076
Source
Eur Heart J. 2005 Aug;26(15):1513-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
R E Anderson
K. Klerdal
T. Ivert
N. Hammar
G. Barr
A. Owall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anaesthesiology, Karolinska University Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. russell.anderson@kirurgi.ki.se
Source
Eur Heart J. 2005 Aug;26(15):1513-8
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus - mortality
Diabetic Angiopathies - mortality
Fasting - blood
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - surgery
Preoperative Care
ROC Curve
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) below the diagnostic threshold for diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with macrovascular pathology and increased mortality after percutaneous coronary interventions. The study goal was to determine whether pre-operative fasting blood glucose (fB-glu) is associated with an increased mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). METHODS AND RESULTS: During 2001-03, 1895 patients underwent primary CABG [clinical DM (CDM) in 440/1895; complete data on fB-glu for n=1375/1455]. Using pre-operative fB-glu, non-diabetics were categorized as having normal fB-glu ( or =6.1 mmol/L). fB-glu was normal in 59%. The relative risks of 30 day and 1 year mortality compared with patients with normal fB-glu was 1.7 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.5-5.5] and 2.9 (CI: 0.8-11.2) with IFG, 2.8 (CI: 1.1-7.2) and 1.9 (CI: 0.5-6.3) with SDM vs. 1.8 (CI: 0.8-4.0) and 1.6 (CI: 0.6-4.3) if CDM, respectively. The receiver operator characteristic area for the continuous variable fB-glu and 1 year mortality was 0.65 (P=0.002). CONCLUSION: The elevated risk of death after CABG surgery known previously to be associated with CDM seems also to be shared by a group of similar size that includes patients with IFG and undiagnosed DM.
PubMed ID
15800018 View in PubMed
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Association between HOMA-IR, fasting insulin and fasting glucose with coronary heart disease mortality in nondiabetic men: a 20-year observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268545
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2015 Feb;52(1):183-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Sudhir Kurl
Francesco Zaccardi
Vivian N Onaemo
Sae Young Jae
Jussi Kauhanen
Kimmo Ronkainen
Jari A Laukkanen
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2015 Feb;52(1):183-6
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Coronary Disease - blood - epidemiology - mortality - physiopathology
Fasting - blood
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Male
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Whether glucose and insulin are differently associated with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality is unclear. We aimed to estimate the association between insulin resistance (estimated by the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, HOMA-IR), fasting serum insulin (FI) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) with incident CHD mortality in a prospective study including middle-aged nondiabetic Finnish men. During an average follow-up of 20 years, 273 (11 %) CHD deaths occurred. In a multivariable Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, serum LDL-cholesterol, cigarette smoking, history of CHD, alcohol consumption, blood leukocytes and plasma fibrinogen, the hazard ratios (HRs) for CHD mortality comparing top versus bottom quartiles were as follows: 1.69 (95 % CI: 1.15-2.48; p = 0.008) for HOMA-IR; 1.59 (1.09-2.32; p = 0.016) for FI; and 1.26 (0.90-1.76; p = 0.173) for FPG. These findings suggest that IR and FI, but not FPG, are independent risk factors for CHD mortality. Further studies could help clarify these results in terms of screening and risk stratification, causality of the associations, and therapeutical implications.
PubMed ID
24974303 View in PubMed
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Association between impaired fasting glycaemia in pediatric obesity and type 2 diabetes in young adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287350
Source
Nutr Diabetes. 2016 08 22;6(8):e227
Publication Type
Article
Date
08-22-2016
Author
E. Hagman
P. Danielsson
L. Brandt
A. Ekbom
C. Marcus
Source
Nutr Diabetes. 2016 08 22;6(8):e227
Date
08-22-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Pediatric Obesity - blood
Prediabetic State - blood
Prospective Studies
Registries
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
In adults, impaired fasting glycemia (IFG) increases the risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study aimed to investigate to which extent children with obesity develop T2DM during early adulthood, and to determine whether IFG and elevated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in obese children are risk markers for early development of T2DM.
In this prospective cohort study, 1620 subjects from the Swedish Childhood Obesity Treatment Registry - BORIS who were ?18 years at follow-up and 8046 individuals in a population-based comparison group, matched on gender age and living area, were included. IFG was defined according to both ADA (cut-off 5.6 mmol?l(-1)) and WHO (6.1 mmol?l(-1)). Elevated HbA1c was defined according to ADA (cut-off 39 mmol?l(-1)). Main outcome was T2DM medication, as a proxy for T2DM. Data on medications were retrieved from a national registry.
The childhood obesity cohort were 24 times more likely to receive T2DM medications in early adulthood compared with the comparison group (95% confidence interval (CI): 12.52-46). WHO-defined IFG predicted future use of T2DM medication with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 3.73 (95% CI: 1.87-7.45) compared with those who had fasting glucose levels
Notes
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PubMed ID
27548712 View in PubMed
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Associations between physical activity, body fat, and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment) in adolescents: the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93501
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Mar;87(3):586-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Rizzo Nico S
Ruiz Jonatan R
Oja Leila
Veidebaum Tomas
Sjöström Michael
Author Affiliation
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. nico.rizzo@biosci.ki.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Mar;87(3):586-92
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body Composition - physiology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Estonia - epidemiology
Exercise - physiology
Fasting - blood
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Linear Models
Male
Obesity - metabolism - prevention & control
Physical Fitness - physiology
Skinfold thickness
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
BACKGROUND: More and better data are needed to understand the action of physical activity (PA) on insulin resistance and the concomitant relation with body fat in adolescence. OBJECTIVE: We examined the relation between total PA and intensity levels with insulin resistance under special consideration of waist circumference and skinfold thickness. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study of 613 adolescents (352 girls, 261 boys) with a mean (+/-SD) age of 15.5 +/- 0.5 y from Sweden and Estonia. Total, low, moderate, and vigorous PA was measured by accelerometry. Body fat estimators included waist circumference and the sum of 5 skinfold thicknesses. Fasting insulin and glucose were measured, and insulin resistance was calculated according to the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). Linear regression analysis and analysis of covariance were used to determine the association between PA and insulin resistance while considering body fat. All estimates were adjusted for sex, country, pubertal status, and indicators of body fat when applicable. RESULTS: Total, moderate, and vigorous PA were inversely correlated with HOMA. Body fat estimators were positively correlated with HOMA. Significant contrasts in HOMA concentrations were seen when comparing the lower 2 tertiles with the upper tertile of PA indicators. Repeating the analysis with body fat estimators showed significant contrasts in HOMA concentrations when comparing the lower tertiles with the upper tertile. CONCLUSION: In view of an increase in obesity in young people, the results accentuate the role of PA in sustaining metabolic balance in adolescence and the potential benefit of an increase of time spent at higher PA levels for youth with relatively elevated amounts of body fat.
PubMed ID
18326595 View in PubMed
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