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A 10-Year Follow-Up of Adiposity and Dementia in Swedish Adults Aged 70 Years and Older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300956
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 63(4):1325-1335
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Ilse A C Arnoldussen
Valter Sundh
Kristoffer Bäckman
Silke Kern
Svante Östling
Kaj Blennow
Henrik Zetterberg
Ingmar Skoog
Amanda J Kiliaan
Deborah R Gustafson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 63(4):1325-1335
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adiposity
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Dementia - blood - epidemiology - pathology
Fasting
Female
Humans
Independent living
Leptin - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Adiposity measured in mid- or late-life and estimated using anthropometric measures such as body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), or metabolic markers such as blood leptin and adiponectin levels, is associated with late-onset dementia risk. However, during later life, this association may reverse and aging- and dementia-related processes may differentially affect adiposity measures.
We explored associations of concurrent BMI, WHR, and blood leptin and high molecular weight adiponectin levels with dementia occurrence.
924 Swedish community-dwelling elderly without dementia, aged 70 years and older, systematically-sampled by birth day and birth year population-based in the Gothenburg city region of Sweden. The Gothenburg Birth Cohort Studies are designed for evaluating risk and protective factors for dementia. All dementias diagnosed after age 70 for 10 years were identified. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to predict dementia occurrence between 2000-2005, 2005-2010, and 2000-2010 after excluding prevalent baseline (year 2000) dementias. Baseline levels of BMI, WHR, leptin, and adiponectin were used.
Within 5 years of baseline, low BMI (
PubMed ID
29758945 View in PubMed
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The -250G>A promoter variant in hepatic lipase associates with elevated fasting serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol modulated by interaction with physical activity in a study of 16,156 Danish subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85800
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Jun;93(6):2294-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Grarup Niels
Andreasen Camilla H
Andersen Mette K
Albrechtsen Anders
Sandbaek Annelli
Lauritzen Torsten
Borch-Johnsen Knut
Jørgensen Torben
Schmitz Ole
Hansen Torben
Pedersen Oluf
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center, Niels Steensens Vej 1, Gentofte, Denmark. ngrp@steno.dk
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Jun;93(6):2294-9
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Fasting - blood
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Screening
Genotype
Heterozygote
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Linkage Disequilibrium
Lipase - genetics
Motor Activity - genetics - physiology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Abstract
CONTEXT: Hepatic lipase plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein by involvement in reverse cholesterol transport and the formation of atherogenic small dense low-density lipoprotein. OBJECTIVES: The objective was to investigate the impact of variants in LIPC on metabolic traits and type 2 diabetes in a large sample of Danes. Because behavioral factors influence hepatic lipase activity, we furthermore examined possible gene-environment interactions in the population-based Inter99 study. DESIGN: The LIPC -250G>A (rs2070895) variant was genotyped in the Inter99 study (n = 6070), the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen Detected Diabetes in Primary Care Denmark screening cohort of individuals with risk factors for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (n = 8662), and in additional type 2 diabetic patients (n = 1,064) and glucose-tolerant control subjects (n = 360). RESULTS: In the Inter99 study, the A allele of rs2070895 associated with a 0.057 mmol/liter [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.039-0.075] increase in fasting serum HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) (P = 8 x 10(-10)) supported by association in the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen Detected Diabetes in Primary Care study [0.038 mmol/liter per allele (95% CI 0.024-0.053); P = 2 x 10(-7)). The allelic effect on HDL-c was modulated by interaction with self-reported physical activity (P(interaction) = 0.002) because vigorous physically active homozygous A-allele carriers had a 0.30 mmol/liter (95% CI 0.22-0.37) increase in HDL-c compared with homozygous G-allele carriers. CONCLUSIONS: We validate the association of LIPC promoter variation with fasting serum HDL-c and present data supporting an interaction with physical activity implying an increased effect on HDL-c in vigorous physically active subjects carrying the -250 A allele. This interaction may have potential implications for public health and disease prevention.
PubMed ID
18364377 View in PubMed
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Abnormal glucose regulation in patients with acute ST- elevation myocardial infarction-a cohort study on 224 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90209
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2009;8:6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Knudsen Eva C
Seljeflot Ingebjørg
Abdelnoor Michael
Eritsland Jan
Mangschau Arild
Arnesen Harald
Andersen Geir O
Author Affiliation
Center for Clinical Heart Research, Ullevål University Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. evacecilie.knudsen@ulleval.no
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2009;8:6
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diagnostic Tests, Routine
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Intolerance - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Unnecessary Procedures
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A high prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance and unknown type 2-diabetes in patients with coronary heart disease and no previous diagnosis of diabetes have been reported. The aims of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of abnormal glucose regulation (AGR) 3 months after an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients without known glucometabolic disturbance, to evaluate the reliability of a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) performed very early after an acute STEMI to predict the presence of AGR at 3 months, and to study other potential predictors measured in-hospital for AGR at 3 months. METHODS: This was an observational cohort study prospectively enrolling 224 STEMI patients treated with primary PCI. An OGTT was performed very early after an acute STEMI and was repeated in 200 patients after 3 months. We summarised the exact agreement observed, and assessed the observed reproducibility of the OGTTs performed in-hospital and at follow up. The patients were classified into glucometabolic categories defined according to the World Health Organisation criteria. AGR was defined as the sum of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2-diabetes. RESULTS: The prevalence of AGR at three months was 24.9% (95% CI 19.1, 31.4%), reduced from 46.9% (95% CI 40.2, 53.6) when measured in-hospital. Only, 108 of 201 (54%) patients remained in the same glucometabolic category after a repeated OGTT. High levels of HbA1c and admission plasma glucose in-hospital significantly predicted AGR at 3 months (p
PubMed ID
19183453 View in PubMed
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Abnormality of energy metabolism in the skeletal muscle of patients with liver cirrhosis and changes under administration of glucose and branched-chain amino acids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5271
Source
Tokai J Exp Clin Med. 2004 Dec;29(4):191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Jun Doi
Koichi Shiraishi
Munetaka Haida
Shohei Matsuzaki
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology, Tokai University Hachioji Hospital, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0032, Japan.
Source
Tokai J Exp Clin Med. 2004 Dec;29(4):191-8
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Amino Acids, Branched-Chain - administration & dosage
Case-Control Studies
Citric Acid Cycle
Comparative Study
Energy Metabolism
Exercise
Fasting
Female
Glucose - administration & dosage - metabolism
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Liver Cirrhosis - metabolism
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle, Skeletal - metabolism
Oxygen - metabolism
Phosphocreatine - metabolism
Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared
Abstract
We assessed changes in skeletal muscle energy metabolism by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) and oxygen supply by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR), after exercise and after administration of glucose and a branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), in healthy volunteers and patients with liver cirrhosis. As for the patients with liver cirrhosis, 4 were classified in Child-Pugh Grade A and the other 4 in Grade B. In patients with liver cirrhosis, the intramuscular pH and PCr index (PCr/PCr + Pi) were lower than in healthy subjects after exercise in the fasting state; the deltapH and deltaPCr index were statistically siginificant (p
PubMed ID
15717491 View in PubMed
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Acarbose for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: facts and interpretations concerning the critical analysis of the STOP-NIDDM Trial data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179962
Source
Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):969-75; discussion 976-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
J-L Chiasson
R G Josse
R. Gomis
M. Hanefeld
A. Karasik
M. Laakso
Author Affiliation
Research Centre, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal-Hôtel-Dieu, Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, 3850 St. Urbain Street, Rm 8-202, Montreal, Quebec H2W 1T7, Canada. jean.louis.chiasson@umontreal.ca
Source
Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):969-75; discussion 976-7
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acarbose - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - chemistry
Body Weight - drug effects
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Clinical Protocols
Data Collection - ethics - methods
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Double-Blind Method
Eating - physiology
Ethics, Clinical
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Intolerance - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Risk Reduction Behavior
Stroke - classification - etiology - prevention & control
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Withholding Treatment - ethics
Abstract
The STOP-NIDDM Trial has shown that acarbose treatment in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance is associated with a significant risk reduction in the development of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular complications. Kaiser and Sawicki have accused the investigators of the STOP-NIDDM Trial of major biases in the conduct of the study, of manipulating the data and of conflict of interest. The aim of this paper is to present data and explanations refuting these allegations. In the STOP-NIDDM Trial, 61 subjects were excluded from the efficacy analysis before unblinding for legitimate reasons: failure to satisfy major entry criteria (n=17) and lack of post-randomisation data (n=44). Blinding and randomisation were carried out by an independent biostatistician. Titration of placebo/acarbose is well described in the protocol and in the study design paper. Of the study population, 9.3% had a fasting plasma glucose of > or =7.0 mmol/l at screening and could have been diabetic according to the new diagnostic criteria. However, even if these subjects are excluded, patients having acarbose treatment still saw a significant risk reduction in the development of diabetes (p=0.0027). The changes in weight are consistent in different publications and are related to different times of follow-up and assessment. Weight change does have an effect on the development of diabetes, but acarbose treatment is still effective even after adjusting for this (p=0.0063). The cardiovascular endpoints were a clearly designated assessment in the original protocol, and only those defined in the protocol and ascertained by the independent Cardiovascular Event Adjudication Committee were used in the analysis. Hypertension was defined according to the most recent diagnostic criteria. The STOP-NIDDM Trial results are scientifically sound and credible. The investigators stand strongly behind these results demonstrating that acarbose treatment is associated with a delay in the development of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular complications in a high-risk population with IGT.
Notes
Comment In: Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):976-715150689
Comment On: Diabetologia. 2004 Mar;47(3):575-8014727025
PubMed ID
15164169 View in PubMed
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Adiponectin in a native Canadian population experiencing rapid epidemiological transition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182697
Source
Diabetes Care. 2003 Dec;26(12):3219-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Anthony J G Hanley
Philip W Connelly
Stewart B Harris
Bernard Zinman
Author Affiliation
Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. hanley@mshri.on.ca
Source
Diabetes Care. 2003 Dec;26(12):3219-25
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body mass index
Canada
Fasting
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Indians, North American
Insulin - blood
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Male
Metabolic Diseases - blood
Obesity - blood
Proteins - metabolism
Abstract
Adiponectin is emerging as an important protein in the etiology of obesity and related metabolic disorders. The objectives of this study were to determine cross-sectional and prospective associations of adiponectin concentration with adiposity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in a population-based study of Native Canadians, a group experiencing dramatic increases in diabetes and CVD.
During the 1993-1995 baseline survey, samples for glucose, insulin, adiponectin, and lipids were collected after an overnight fast. Waist circumference and percent body fat were measured, and a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was administered: n = 505 with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 74 with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 149 with diabetes. In 1998, 95 high-risk subjects, defined as those who, at baseline, had either IGT or NGT with an elevated 2-h glucose concentration (>/==" BORDER="0">7.0 mmol/l), participated in a follow-up examination using the protocol used at baseline.
After adjustment for covariates including percent body fat and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), adiponectin concentrations were significantly lower among men versus women (10.8 vs. 15.0 micro g/ml, P
PubMed ID
14633805 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue expression of interleukin-18 mRNA is elevated in subjects with metabolic syndrome and independently associated with fasting glucose.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132189
Source
Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2011 Nov;123(21-22):650-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Thomas W Weiss
Harald Arnesen
Marius Trøseid
Christoph Kaun
Elsa M Hjerkinn
Kurt Huber
Johann Wojta
Ingebjorg Seljeflot
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Heart Research, Department of Cardiology, Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Oslo, Norway. thomas.weiss@meduniwien.ac.at
Source
Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2011 Nov;123(21-22):650-4
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Comorbidity
Fasting
Female
Humans
Inflammation - epidemiology - metabolism
Interleukin-18 - genetics - metabolism
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - metabolism
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of risk factors that are highly associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increased serum levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-18 have been reported to be associated with CVD. Recently, IL-18 has been shown to be predictive for cardiovascular events in subjects with MetS. We have investigated the expression of PAI-1, IL-6 and IL-18 in subcutaneous adipose tissue (AT) of subjects with (n = 22) and without (n = 36) MetS. Furthermore, we have analysed the expression of IL-18 in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) in an in vitro model of hyperglycaemia.
We studied the expression of PAI-1, IL-6 and IL-18 in biopsies of subcutaneous adipose tissue using Real-time PCR. After isolation and cultivation of MDMs, expression of IL-18 was determined by Real-time PCR.
Expression of IL-18 was increased in subcutaneous AT of subjects with MetS (p
PubMed ID
21842238 View in PubMed
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Adverse metabolic risk profiles in Greenlandic Inuit children compared to Danish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113926
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Jun;21(6):1226-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
T. Munch-Andersen
K. Sorensen
L B Andersen
N J Aachmann-Andersen
L. Aksglaede
A. Juul
J W Helge
Author Affiliation
Center for Healthy Aging, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. thormunchandersen@gmail.com
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Jun;21(6):1226-31
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adiposity - physiology
Adolescent
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Body Composition
Child
Cholesterol - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Fasting
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits
Linear Models
Male
Metabolome
Obesity - blood - ethnology
Overweight - blood - ethnology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
During recent decades, the prevalence of metabolic morbidity has increased rapidly in adult Greenlandic Inuit. To what extent this is also reflected in the juvenile Inuit population is unknown. The objective was, therefore, in the comparison with Danish children, to evaluate metabolic profiles in Greenlandic Inuit children from the capital in the southern and from the northern most villages
187 Inuit and 132 Danish children were examined with anthropometrics, pubertal staging, fasting blood samples, and a maximal aerobic test.
Both Inuit children living in Nuuk and the northern villages had significantly higher glucose, total cholesterol, apolipoprotein A1 levels, and diastolic blood pressure compared with Danish children after adjustment for differences in adiposity and aerobic fitness levels. The Inuit children living in Nuuk had significantly higher BMI, body fat %, HbA1 c, and significantly lower aerobic fitness and ApoA1 levels than northern living Inuit children.
Greenlandic Inuit children had adverse metabolic health profile compared to the Danish children, the differences where more pronounced in Inuit children living in Nuuk. The tendencies toward higher prevalence of diabetes and metabolic morbidity in the adult Greenlandic Inuit population may also be present in the Inuit children population.
PubMed ID
23670907 View in PubMed
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Age and gender differences in the association between Nt-proBNP and glucometabolic disturbances.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134279
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2011 Oct;45(5):294-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Margret Leosdottir
Ronnie Willenheimer
Christian Hall
Solve Tjora
Johan Malm
Olle Melander
Peter M Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. Margret.Leosdottir@med.lu.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2011 Oct;45(5):294-300
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fasting - blood
Female
Glucose Metabolism Disorders - blood - diagnosis
Heart Diseases - blood - diagnosis - physiopathology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Peptide Fragments - blood
Predictive value of tests
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Glucometabolic disturbances are associated with myocardial dysfunction. Brain natriuretic peptides (BNP) are used for detecting myocardial dysfunction in clinical practice. However, studies on elderly subjects and gender-specific analyses are sparse.
We examined cross-sectional associations between Nt-proBNP and 1) fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and 2) categories of glucometabolic disturbances, in middle-aged and older subjects (1266 men, 526 women), applying multivariate linear regression analysis.
FPG was positively correlated with Nt-proBNP among middle-aged men (p = 0.04) and negatively albeit non-significantly (p = 0.1) among middle-aged women. Weaker non-significant correlations were seen among older subjects. Middle-aged men with new-onset and prevalent diabetes had higher Nt-proBNP than the reference group (FPG =5.0 mmol/L): 9.53 (p = 0.002) and 8.23 (p = 0.02) vs. 5.71 pmol/L. No differences in Nt-proBNP between categories of glucometabolic disturbance were observed among older men or women.
The results indicate an age- and gender difference in the ability of Nt-proBNP to identify myocardial dysfunction in relation to glucometabolic disturbances. Therefore, Nt-proBNP should be used with caution as a general surrogate marker for myocardial dysfunction in this setting.
PubMed ID
21604967 View in PubMed
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Age-associated changes in MAPK activation in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle of the F344/NNiaHSD X Brown Norway/BiNia rat model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82974
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2006 Feb;41(2):205-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Mylabathula D B
Rice K M
Wang Z.
Uddemarri S.
Kinnard R S
Blough E R
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755-1090, USA.
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2006 Feb;41(2):205-14
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Blotting, Western
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
MAP Kinase Signaling System - physiology
Male
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinases - metabolism
Models, Animal
Muscle Contraction
Muscle Fibers, Fast-Twitch - enzymology - physiology
Muscle Fibers, Slow-Twitch - enzymology - physiology
Phosphorylation
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Abstract
We compared the tissue content, basal phosphorylation, and stretch-induced phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) members; extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK 1/2), p38, and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) in the fast-twitch extensor digitorium longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus of young adult (6 month), aged (30 month), and very aged (36 month) F344/NNiaHSD X Brown Norway/BiNia (F344/NXBN) rats. The expression and basal phosphorylation of the ERK 1/2, p38, and JNK MAPK proteins were regulated differently with aging in the EDL and soleus. Stretch induced significant phosphorylation of each signaling molecule in both muscle types of young adult and aged animals. In the very aged animals, stretch stimulated ERK 1/2 MAPK phosphorylation; however, EDL stretch failed to induce JNK MAPK phosphorylation, while soleus stretch was unable to induce the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. The results suggest that skeletal muscle mechanotransduction processes are affected in very aged F344/NXBN rats and that aging alters load-induced signaling in fast- and slow-twitch muscle types differently.
PubMed ID
16378702 View in PubMed
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415 records – page 1 of 42.