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Application of isotope dilution mass spectrometry: determination of ochratoxin A in the Canadian Total Diet Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134090
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):754-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
J. Tam
P. Pantazopoulos
P M Scott
J. Moisey
R W Dabeka
I D K Richard
Author Affiliation
Health Canada-Santé Canada, Ontario Region, Food Laboratories Division, 2301 Midland Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):754-61
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - analysis
Calibration
Canada
Carbon Isotopes
Cereals - chemistry
Chromatography, Affinity
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Diet
Fast Foods - analysis
Food Analysis - methods
Food Contamination
Food Habits
Humans
Indicator Dilution Techniques
Limit of Detection
Nutrition Surveys
Ochratoxins - analysis - chemistry - isolation & purification
Reproducibility of Results
Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Abstract
Analytical methods are generally developed and optimized for specific commodities. Total Diet Studies, representing typical food products 'as consumed', pose an analytical challenge since every food product is different. In order to address this technical challenge, a selective and sensitive analytical method was developed suitable for the quantitation of ochratoxin A (OTA) in Canadian Total Diet Study composites. The method uses an acidified solvent extraction, an immunoaffinity column (IAC) for clean-up, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for identification and quantification, and a uniformly stable isotope-labelled OTA (U-[(13)C(20)]-OTA) as an internal recovery standard. Results are corrected for this standard. The method is accurate (101% average recovery) and precise (5.5% relative standard deviation (RSD)) based on 17 duplicate analysis of various food products over 2 years. A total of 140 diet composites were analysed for OTA as part of the Canadian Total Diet Study. Samples were collected at retail level from two Canadian cities, Quebec City and Calgary, in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The results indicate that 73% (102/140) of the samples had detectable levels of OTA, with some of the highest levels of OTA contamination found in the Canadian bread supply.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21623499 View in PubMed
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Assessment of Nutritional Adequacy of Packaged Gluten-free Food Products.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271315
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2014 Dec;75(4):186-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Tasha Kulai
Mohsin Rashid
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2014 Dec;75(4):186-90
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - adverse effects - analysis - economics
British Columbia
Costs and Cost Analysis
Diet, Gluten-Free - adverse effects - economics
Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects - economics
Edible Grain - adverse effects - chemistry - economics
Fast Foods - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Flour - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Food Labeling
Frozen Foods - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Humans
Meat Products - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
Nutritive Value
Serving Size
Abstract
There is concern about the nutritional quality of processed gluten-free (GF) products. The aim was to investigate the nutrient composition and cost of processed GF products compared with similar regular products.
Product size, price, caloric value, and macro- and micronutrient composition were compared between foods labeled "Gluten-free" and comparable regular products in 5 grocery stores in 3 Canadian cities. Data were calculated per 100 g of product.
A total of 131 products were studied (71 GF, 60 regular). Overall, calories were comparable between GF and regular foods. However, fat content of GF breads was higher (mean 7.7 vs. 3.6 g, P = 0.003), whereas protein was lower (mean 5.0 vs. 8.0 g, P = 0.001). Mean carbohydrate content of GF pasta was higher (78 vs. 74 g, P = 0.001), whereas protein (7.5 vs. 13.3 g, P
PubMed ID
26067071 View in PubMed
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Association between habitual dietary intake and lipoprotein subclass profile in healthy young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117107
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Nov;23(11):1071-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
L H Bogl
K H Pietiläinen
A. Rissanen
A J Kangas
P. Soininen
R J Rose
M. Ala-Korpela
J. Kaprio
Author Affiliation
The Finnish Twin Cohort Study, Department of Public Health, Hjelt Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: leonie-helen.bogl@helsinki.fi.
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Nov;23(11):1071-8
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Biological Markers - blood
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Fast Foods - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fishes
Food Habits
Health promotion
Humans
Lipoproteins - blood - chemistry
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Nutrition Policy
Particle Size
Patient compliance
Seafood
Young Adult
Abstract
Nutritional epidemiology is increasingly shifting its focus from studying single nutrients to the exploration of the whole diet utilizing dietary pattern analysis. We analyzed associations between habitual diet (including macronutrients, dietary patterns, biomarker of fish intake) and lipoprotein particle subclass profile in young adults.
Complete dietary data (food-frequency questionnaire) and lipoprotein subclass profile (via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy) were available for 663 subjects from the population-based FinnTwin12 study (57% women, age: 21-25 y). The serum docosahexaenoic to total fatty acid ratio was used as a biomarker of habitual fish consumption. Factor analysis identified 5 dietary patterns: "Fruit and vegetables", "Meat", "Sweets and desserts", "Junk food" and "Fish". After adjustment for sex, age, body mass index, waist circumference, physical activity, smoking status and alcohol intake, the "Junk food" pattern was positively related to serum triglycerides (r = 0.12, P = 0.002), a shift in the subclass distribution of VLDL toward larger particles (r = 0.12 for VLDL size, P
PubMed ID
23333726 View in PubMed
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Association between parental motives for food choice and eating patterns of 12- to 13-year-old Norwegian children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120156
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Nov;16(11):2023-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Inger M Oellingrath
Margrethe Hersleth
Martin V Svendsen
Author Affiliation
1 Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Department of Health Studies, Telemark University College, PO Box 201, 3914 Porsgrunn, Norway.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Nov;16(11):2023-31
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Body Weight
Child
Child Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Energy intake
Family
Fast Foods
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Health Behavior
Health Food
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Meals
Motivation
Norway
Parents
Principal Component Analysis
Questionnaires
Taste
Abstract
To determine (i) the importance of parents’ motives for everyday family food choices; and (ii) the relationship between parental food choice motives and eating patterns of 12- to 13-year-old children.
Cross-sectional study. A modified version of the Food Choice Questionnaire was used to determine parental motives for food choices. The children’s food and drink intake was reported by their parents using a retrospective FFQ. Eating patterns were derived using principal component analysis. The association between food choice motives and eating patterns was examined using multiple linear regression analysis.
Primary schools, Telemark County, Norway.
In total, 1095 children aged 12–13 years and their parents.
The parental motive ‘sensory appeal’ was the most important for food choice, followed by ‘health’, ‘convenience’, ‘natural content’ and ‘weight control’. The food choice motives were associated with the eating patterns of the children, independent of background variables. The motive ‘health’ was most strongly associated with a ‘varied Norwegian’ eating pattern, representing a diverse diet and regular meals, while the motive ‘convenience’ appeared to be the most important barrier to this eating pattern. ‘Weight control’ was not associated with the ‘varied Norwegian’ eating pattern.
To encourage parents to make healthy food choices for their children, health promotion activities should focus on the health benefits of a diverse diet and regular meals, rather than weight control. Recommended food products should be made more convenient and easily available for families with children.
PubMed ID
23034288 View in PubMed
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The association between time scarcity, sociodemographic correlates and consumption of ultra-processed foods among parents in Norway: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286522
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 May 15;17(1):447
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2017
Author
Ingrid Laukeland Djupegot
Camilla Bengtson Nenseth
Elling Bere
Helga Birgit Torgeirsdotter Bjørnarå
Sissel Heidi Helland
Nina Cecilie Øverby
Monica Klungland Torstveit
Tonje Holte Stea
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 May 15;17(1):447
Date
May-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fast Foods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Parents - psychology
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Use of ultra-processed foods has expanded rapidly over the last decades and high consumption has been positively associated with risk of e.g. overweight, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Ultra-processed foods offer convenience as they require minimal time for preparation. It is therefore reasonable to assume that such foods are consumed more often among people who experience time scarcity. The main aim of this study was to investigate the association between time scarcity and consumption of ultra-processed foods among parents of 2-year olds in Norway. A secondary aim was to investigate the association between sociodemographic correlates, weight status and consumption of ultra-processed foods.
This cross-sectional study included 497 participants. Chi-square and cross tabulations were used to calculate proportions of high vs. low consumption of ultra-processed foods in relation to time scarcity, sociodemographic correlates and weight status. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed to test the relationship between independent variables and consumption of ultra-processed foods.
Participants reporting medium and high time scarcity were more likely to have a high consumption of ultra-processed dinner products (OR = 3. 68, 95% CI = 2. 32-5.84 and OR = 3.10, 1.80-5.35, respectively) and fast foods (OR = 2.60, 1.62-4.18 and OR = 1.90, 1.08-3.32, respectively) compared to those with low time scarcity. Further, participants with medium time scarcity were more likely to have a high consumption of snacks and soft drinks compared to participants with low time scarcity (OR = 1.63, 1.06-2.49). Finally, gender, ethnicity, educational level, number of children in the household and weight status were identified as important factors associated with the consumption of certain types of ultra-processed foods.
Results from the present study showed that time scarcity, various sociodemographic factors and weight status was associated with consumption of processed foods. Future studies with a longitudinal design are needed to further explore these patterns over a longer period of time.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28506318 View in PubMed
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Association of fast-food restaurant and fruit and vegetable store densities with cardiovascular mortality in a metropolitan population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141001
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2010 Oct;25(10):711-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Mark Daniel
Catherine Paquet
Nathalie Auger
Geng Zang
Yan Kestens
Author Affiliation
Sansom Institute for Health Research, The University of South Australia, North Terrace, Adelaide, SA, Australia. mark.daniel@unisa.edu.au
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2010 Oct;25(10):711-9
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Fast Foods - supply & distribution
Female
Fruit - supply & distribution
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Urban Population
Vegetables - supply & distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
Most studies that link neighbourhoods to disease outcomes have represented neighbourhoods as area-level socioeconomic status. Where objective contextual attributes of urban environments have been measured, few studies of food availability have evaluated mortality as an outcome. We sought to estimate associations between the availability of fast-food restaurants (FFR), fruit and vegetable stores (FVS), and cardiovascular mortality in an urban area. Food business data were extracted from a validated commercial database containing all businesses and services in the Montréal Census Metropolitan Area (MCMA). Mortality data (1999-2003) were obtained for the MCMA (3.4 million residents). Directly standardised mortality rates for cardiovascular deaths (n = 30,388) and non-cardiovascular deaths (all causes - cardiovascular deaths) (n = 91,132) and FFR and FVS densities (n/km²) were analysed for 845 census tracts. Generalised additive models and generalised linear models were used to analyse food source-mortality relationships. FVS density was not associated with cardiovascular or non-cardiovascular mortality (relative risk (RR) = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.76, 1.36, and RR = 1.14, 95% CI: 0.87, 1.50, respectively). Higher FFR density was associated with mortality in bivariate and multivariable analyses. Relative risks of death (95% CI) per 10% increase in FFR density were similar for both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality: 1.39 (1.19, 1.63) and 1.36 (1.18, 1.57), respectively, accounting for socio-demographic covariates. FFR density is associated with cardiovascular mortality but this relationship is no different in magnitude than that for non-cardiovascular mortality. These results together with null associations between FVS density and mortality do not support a major role for food source availability in cardiovascular outcomes.
PubMed ID
20821254 View in PubMed
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Associations between children's diets and features of their residential and school neighbourhood food environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128375
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(9 Suppl 3):eS48-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Andraea Van Hulst
Tracie A Barnett
Lise Gauvin
Mark Daniel
Yan Kestens
Madeleine Bird
Katherine Gray-Donald
Marie Lambert
Author Affiliation
École de santé publique, Université de Montréal; Centre de recherche du CHU Sainte-Justine. a.van.hulst@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(9 Suppl 3):eS48-54
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Environment Design - statistics & numerical data
Fast Foods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Quebec
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Schools
Abstract
Among studies of the built environment, few examine neighbourhood food environments in relation to children's diets. We examined the associations of residential and school neighbourhood access to different types of food establishments with children's diets.
Data from QUALITY (Quebec Adipose and Lifestyle Investigation in Youth), an ongoing study on the natural history of obesity in 630 Quebec youth aged 8-10 years with a parental history of obesity, were analyzed (n=512). Three 24-hour diet recalls were used to assess dietary intake of vegetables and fruit, and sugar-sweetened beverages. Questionnaires were used to determine the frequency of eating/snacking out and consumption of delivered/take-out foods. We characterized residential and school neighbourhood food environments by means of a Geographic Information System. Variables included distance to the nearest supermarket, fast-food restaurant and convenience store, and densities of each food establishment type computed for 1 km network buffers around each child's residence and school. Retail Food Environment indices were also computed. Multivariable logistic regressions (residential access) and generalized estimating equations (school access) were used for analysis.
Residential and school neighbourhood access to supermarkets was not associated with children's diets. Residing in neighbourhoods with lower access to fast-food restaurants and convenience stores was associated with a lower likelihood of eating and snacking out. Children attending schools in neighbourhoods with a higher number of unhealthful relative to healthful food establishments scored most poorly on dietary outcomes.
Further investigations are needed to inform policies aimed at shaping neighbourhood-level food purchasing opportunities, particularly for access to fast-food restaurants and convenience stores.
PubMed ID
23618089 View in PubMed
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Associations between residential food environment and dietary patterns in urban-dwelling older adults: results from the VoisiNuAge study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122667
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Nov;15(11):2026-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Geneviève Mercille
Lucie Richard
Lise Gauvin
Yan Kestens
Bryna Shatenstein
Mark Daniel
Hélène Payette
Author Affiliation
Institut de recherche en santé publique de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. genevieve.mercille.1@umontreal.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Nov;15(11):2026-39
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Commerce
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Environment
Fast Foods
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Questionnaires
Restaurants
Urban Population
Abstract
To examine associations between the availability of residential-area food sources and dietary patterns among seniors.
Cross-sectional analyses. Individual-level data from the NuAge study on nutrition and healthy ageing were merged with geographic information system data on food store availability and area-level social composition. Two dietary patterns reflecting lower- and higher-quality diets (respectively designated 'western' and 'prudent') were identified from FFQ data. Two food source relative availability measures were calculated for a 500 m road-network buffer around participants' homes: (i) proportion of fast-food outlets (%FFO) relative to all restaurants and (ii) proportion of stores potentially selling healthful foods (%HFS, healthful food stores) relative to all food stores. Associations between dietary patterns and food source exposure were tested in linear regression models accounting for individual (health and sociodemographic) and area-level (socio-economic and ethnicity) covariates.
Montréal metropolitan area, Canada.
Urban-dwelling older adults (n 751), aged 68 to 84 years.
%FFO was inversely associated with prudent diet (ß = -0·105; P
PubMed ID
22789436 View in PubMed
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Availability of limited service food outlets surrounding schools in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114382
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jul-Aug;103(4):e255-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jennifer L Black
Meghan Day
Author Affiliation
Food, Nutrition and Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC. j.black@ubc.ca.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jul-Aug;103(4):e255-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Commerce - statistics & numerical data
Fast Foods - supply & distribution
Food Services - statistics & numerical data
Food Supply
Humans
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Schools - statistics & numerical data
Social Environment
Walking
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to provide a descriptive profile of the availability of limited service food outlets surrounding public schools in British Columbia, Canada.
Data from the 2010 Canadian Business Data Files were used to identify limited service food outlets including fast food outlets, beverage and snack food stores, delis and convenience stores. The number of food outlets within 800 metres of 1,392 public schools and the distance from schools to the nearest food outlets were assessed. Multivariate regression models examined the associations between food outlet availability and school-level characteristics.
In 2010, over half of the public schools in BC (54%) were located within a 10-12 minute walk from at least one limited service food outlet. The median closest distance to a food outlet was just over 1 km (1016 m). Schools comprised of students living in densely populated urban neighbourhoods and neighbourhoods characterized by lower socio-economic status were more likely to have access to limited service food outlets within walking distance. After adjusting for school-level median family income and population density, larger schools had higher odds of exposure to food vendors compared to schools with fewer students.
The availability of and proximity to limited service food outlets vary widely across schools in British Columbia and school-level characteristics are significantly associated with food outlet availability. Additional research is needed to understand how food environment exposures inside and surrounding schools impact students' attitudes, food choices and dietary quality.
PubMed ID
23618636 View in PubMed
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Calls for restricting the marketing of unhealthy food to children: Canadian cardiovascular health care and scientific community get ignored by policy makers. What can they do?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104726
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 May;30(5):479-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Norm Campbell
Andrew Pipe
Tara Duhaney
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology and Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: ncampbel@ucalgary.ca.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 May;30(5):479-81
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Child
Fast Foods - adverse effects
Food Habits
Food Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Regulation
Health Policy
Humans
Marketing - legislation & jurisprudence
Societies, Medical - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
24630374 View in PubMed
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57 records – page 1 of 6.